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Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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3DP @ 2015 White House Science Fair - 3D Printing Industry

3DP @ 2015 White House Science Fair - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it

President Obama announced a huge number of contributions from the private sector to STEM education in the United States, totalling $240M.


Members from the 3D Printing and Maker communities have made some excellent contributions to fund STEM education in the US.

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New ‘MIND’ diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI

New ‘MIND’ diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new diet known by the acronym MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) could significantly lower a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) — even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

This finding comes from a longitudinal study by Rush University Medical Center and Harvard School of Public Health of 923 volunteers (144 of them developed AD) shows that the MIND diet lowered the risk of AD by as much as 53 percent in participants who adhered to the diet rigorously, and by about 35 percent in those who followed it moderately well.
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3D-printed sensors to lower cost, improve comfort in diabetes management | KurzweilAI

3D-printed sensors to lower cost, improve comfort in diabetes management | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Engineers at Oregon State University have used additive manufacturing to create an improved type of glucose sensor for patients with Type 1 diabetes, part of a system that should work better, cost less, and be more comfortable for the patient.

A key advance is use of an electrohydrodynamic jet (“e-jet” printing) to make the sensor, which detects glucose concentration based on electric current flow. Conceptually, e-jet printing is a little like an inexpensive inkjet printer, but it creates much finer drop sizes and works with biological materials such as enzymes, instead of ink.

It uses a thin polyimide substrate that allows for wrapping the e-jet printed sensors around catheters with high radius of curvature.
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How fatty acids can fight prostate cancer

A mechanism by which omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells has been found by researchers. The findings, which are at odds with a 2013 study asserting that omega-3s increase the risk of prostate cancer, point the way to more effective anti-cancer drugs.
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Spherical nucleic acids train immune system to fight disease | KurzweilAI

Spherical nucleic acids train immune system to fight disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A research team led by Northwestern University nanomedicine expert Chad A. Mirkin and Sergei Gryaznov of AuraSense Therapeutics has shown that spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) can be used as potent drugs to effectively train the immune system to fight disease, by either boosting or dampening the immune response. The initial treatment triggers a cell-specific immune response all over the body.

By increasing the body’s immune response toward a specific cell type, SNAs could be used to target anything from influenza to different forms of cancer. They also can be used to suppress the immune response, a tactic important in treating autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis, where the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissues.
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Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria | The Scientist Magazine®

Widely Used Antibiotics Affect Mitochondria | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
From plants to mice and human cells, tetracyclines lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms.
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Vegetarians who eat fish could be greatly reducing their risk of colon cancer - CNN.com

Vegetarians who eat fish could be greatly reducing their risk of colon cancer - CNN.com | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Dropping red meat, and sticking to a plant-based diet that incorporates fish may be the key to preventing colorectal (colon and rectum) cancers, according to a seven-year study published Monday. Pescetarians, as they are commonly referred, had a 43% lower chance of getting the cancer compared to people with omnivorous diets.

Why focus on colorectal cancer? It is the third most diagnosed cancer, and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the US in 2014, according to American Cancer Society statistics.
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Should I Drink Red Wine?

Cheers to your health! All five of our experts give red wine a purple-stained smile.

At 125 calories for a five-ounce pour, it’s a lighter choice than beer and mixed drinks, says Julia Zumpano, a dietitian at Cleveland Clinic’s Heart & Vascular Institute. And yes, it’s got more antioxidants, too—including resveratrol, that famous compound billed as the miracle in chocolate and vino.
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Medical Models with Blood, Guts, & All - 3D Printing Industry

Medical Models with Blood, Guts, & All - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The product will be released onto the market, potentially, this April, but one doctor named Maki Sugimoto, an instructor at Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine in Kobe, Japan, has tested Fasotec’s prototypes, describing them as “too realistic”. He tells Shingo Ito at AFP, that the models could be mistaken for the actual organs themselves. Sugimoto adds, “The touch is similar to that of the real liver.”
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Ray Kurzweil on Singularity 1on1: Be Who You Would Like To Be

https://www.singularityweblog.com/ray-kurzweil-on-singularity-1-on-1/ Ray Kurzweil‘s impact on my life in general but especially on what I have been doing for the…
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March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Colorectal cancer is treatable when detected early and today there are more than 1 million survivors living in the United States.

Colorectal cancer or colon cancer, occurs in the colon or rectum and although it affects men and women of all ages and races, colorectal cancer is more prevalent in people 50 years or older. Early detection through proper screening is key.



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Did you know: 1.5M Americans have IBD, which increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer -and- makes it harder to detect early symptoms.


If you or someone you know has IBD, make sure they get screened for CRC!


#getscreened #crcawareness #IBD

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Magnetic nanoparticles could stop blood-clot-caused strokes and heart attacks | KurzweilAI

Magnetic nanoparticles could stop blood-clot-caused strokes and heart attacks | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Houston Methodist researchers have developed magnetic nanoparticles that in tests delivered drugs to destroy blood clots up to 1000 times faster than a commonly used clot-busting technique.

If the drug delivery system performs similarly well in planned human clinical trials, it could mean a major step forward in the prevention of strokes, heart attacks, pulmonary embolisms, and other dire circumstances where clots — if not quickly busted — can cause severe tissue damage and death, the researchers say.
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Researchers Find Way to Harness Brain to Control Bionic Hands

In a new study in the journal Lancet, three men who completely lost the use of their hands because of devastating nerve damage were fitted with robotic hands they can control with their thoughts.
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HCx3DP Getting Ready To Panel The Shit Out of NYC

HCx3DP Getting Ready To Panel The Shit Out of NYC | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New York City is getting ready for an invasion by the 3D printing industry, and as 3D Print Week draws closer, we are getting ready to bring you up to speed on all the happenings. As a part of the Meckler Media week-long 3D printing event, meet-ups associated with 3D Print Week will be popping up around New York, including one series devoted specifically to the use of the technology in the field of medicine.
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95-Year-Old Obliterates Running Record Like A Champ

95-Year-Old Obliterates Running Record Like A Champ | Longevity science | Scoop.it
He took up exercise in his 80s and just set a world record. ...


If Charles Eugster is any example, maybe Usain Bolt ought to put off his planned retirement by 60 years or so.


Eugster, 95, obliterated the 95-and-over world indoor record for 200 meters Sunday at a British Masters Athletics meet in London.

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How low- calorie diets can lead to healthy ageing - newkerala news #26107

Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake.

The study focused on a molecule called "AMP-activated protein kinase," or AMPK, which acts as a molecular fuel gauge to detect energy levels. It's been known that AMPK plays important roles in all cell types, but researchers didn't understand which of these activities were most critical to regulating longevity.
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A ’3D printer’ for customized small molecules such as drugs | KurzweilAI

A ’3D printer’ for customized small molecules such as drugs | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have developed a simpler way to synthesize small molecules, eliminating a major bottleneck in creating new medicines.

As the scientists note in the March 13, 2015, issue of the journal Science, “small-molecule syntheses typically employ strategies and purification methods that are highly customized for each target, thus requiring automation solutions to be developed [inefficiently] on an ad hoc basis.”

According to Martin Burke, an HHMI early career scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who led the research, the highly customized approach that chemists have long relied on to synthesize small molecules is time consuming and inaccessible to most researchers.


“A lot of great medicines have not been discovered yet because of this synthesis bottleneck,” he says.

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The Objet 260 Dental Selection Printer - 3D Printing Industry

The Objet 260 Dental Selection Printer - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Realistic dental models produced by the Objet260 Dental Selection include “life-like gum textures for precise functional testing, as well as a wide range of shades for customized color matching.”

The Objet260 Dental Selection 3D Printer works with PolyJet dental materials, which allows users to create a wider range of dental applications and reduce equipment expenses.
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Eating fish can make you less aggressive - newkerala news #24814

In a new Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI) study, serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders.

Here they discuss the relevance of these micronutrients for neuropsychiatric illness. Serotonin affects a wide-range of cognitive functions and behaviors including mood, decision-making, social behavior, impulsive behavior, and even plays a role in social decision-making by keeping in check aggressive social responses or impulsive behavior.
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‘Heart on a chip’ reduces time and cost in drug testing for safety and efficacy | KurzweilAI

‘Heart on a chip’ reduces time and cost in drug testing for safety and efficacy | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A UC Berkeley research team led by bioengineering professor Kevin Healy has developed a network of pulsating cardiac muscle cells that models human heart tissue.


They have also demonstrated the viability of this system as a drug-screening tool by testing it with cardiovascular medications.

This “organ-on-a-chip,” housed in an inch-long silicone (a rubberlike material) device, represents a major step forward in the development of accurate, faster methods of testing for drug toxicity, the researchers say.



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New study suggests aging has little impact on brain function

New study suggests aging has little impact on brain function | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When we get older, communication between neurons slows down and certain regions of the brain see reduced function. At least, that's the current understanding. But a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge and Medical Research Council's Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit shows that the difference between older brains and younger ones may not be so great. The researchers demonstrated that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which is commonly used to study brain activity, is susceptible to signal noise from changing vascular (blood vessel) activity.
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Aprecia to 3D Print Medicines - 3D Printing Industry

According to in-PharmaTechnologist.com, Aprecia will invest $25 million in the facility to take on 150 new employees for the production of its ZipDose products. Though the drug has not yet been approved by the FDA, it was submitted for approval in October of last year and the company hopes to obtain approval soon. ZipDose is meant to deliver the active chemicals in a drug more quickly than other over-the-counter “fast melt” pills and, according to the company, the manufacturing of ZipDose relies heavily on 3D printing.



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12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine - 3D Printing Industry

12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Kaiba Gionfriddo was born prematurely in 2011. After 8 months, his lung development caused concerns, although he was sent home with his parents as his breathing was normal. Six weeks later, Kaiba stopped breathing and turned blue. He was diagnosed with tracheobronchomalacia, a long Latin word that means his that windpipe was so weak that it collapsed. He had a tracheostomy and was put on a ventilator – the conventional treatment. Still, Kaiba would stop breathing almost daily. His heart would stop, too. Then, his caregivers 3D printed a bioresorbable device that instantly helped Kaiba breathe. This case is considered a prime example of how customized 3D printing is transforming healthcare as we know it.

Since Kaiba’s story, 3D printing in medicine has been skyrocketing. And the list of objects that have already been successfully printed in this field demonstrates the potential that this technology holds for healthcare in the near future.
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3D-printed guide could find use in better nerve repairs

3D-printed guide could find use in better nerve repairs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When someone suffers an injury that results in a severed nerve, the usual treatment involves sewing the two severed ends directly back together, or bridging them by suturing in a nerve graft. Such repairs don't always function perfectly, however. What works better is to let the two ends grow back into each other. Scientists at the University of Sheffield have developed a means of helping them do so, in the form of a 3D-printed nerve guidance conduit (NGC).

An NGC is essentially just a tiny tube that the two nerve ends are fed into either end of. As they grow, they're guided towards one another, until they finally merge. Non-3D-printed NGCs are already sometimes used to repair damaged nerves, although because they're only available in a limited number of designs, their applications are limited.
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