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Curcumin Promotes a Healthy Inflammatory Response

Curcumin Promotes a Healthy Inflammatory Response | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Inflammations are rapidly becoming recognized as an important predictor of health. Therefore, promoting a healthy inflammatory response is one of the best things you can do for your overall health, especially the health of your joints, your brain and your cardiovascular system.*

Cutting-edge science is showing that curcumin is one of the most powerful compounds ever studied when it comes to promoting a healthy inflammatory response. Research suggests curcumin is so effective because it is a potent inhibitor of the body's inflammation-causing chemicals.
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Improved understanding of genetics offers new hope for diabetics

Improved understanding of genetics offers new hope for diabetics | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In the past, researchers have looked at the effects of genetics in altering the immune system in Type 1 diabetes, and on metabolic dysfunction of the liver in Type 2. The new research pushed forward our understanding of the disease, finding that genetics also affect the insulin-producing beta cells.

Working with laboratory mice, the team found that animals with weak beta cells that were ineffective at repairing DNA damage quickly developed the disease when under cellular stress. Those with stronger cells that were good at repairing DNA damage never developed the condition, even when the beta cells were placed under severe levels of stress. The same trend was observed when the researchers looked at the disease in human patients' samples, strongly indicating a genetic predisposition for fragile beta cells heightens the likelihood of developing the disease.
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Curcumall High Absorption Liquid Curcumin + Turmeric

Studies have shown that curcumin has both potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capabilities yet many people have trouble taking curcumin as a supplement due to gastrointestinal upset and/or poor absorption.

 

Curcumall® is an all-natural herbal supplement developed over the course of five years by scientists in the health and medical research fields to harness the health giving properties of curcumin without the problem of stomach upset and with improved absorption.

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

We invite you to try this superior anti-inflammatory liquid curcumin delivery without piperine to cause stomach upset. Every bottle is $10 off right now.

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Healthy tears: Vitamin C may protect against cataracts

Healthy tears: Vitamin C may protect against cataracts | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increasing vitamin C intake may have a protective effect against the progression of cataracts, a British study has revealed.

 

Study participants had a 33% reduction in cataract progression.

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Protective bubble ferries prostate cancer drugs to their target

Protective bubble ferries prostate cancer drugs to their target | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Research has uncovered a number of promising drug targets to halt the progression of prostate cancer, including proteins that inhibit the immune response to molecules that drive growth of a tumor's blood vessels. By taking aim at one protein in particular, scientists have been able slow the growth of prostate cancer in mice and also activate a kill switch in the tumor's cells.

The protein, called P21 activated kinases-1 (PAK-1), plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer cells. Researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) liken it to an on-off switch for cancer, and had previously tried to intervene with a molecule called IPA-3 that is known to inhibit its activity. They encountered problems, however, with the body's metabolism breaking the molecule down before it could properly perform its role.
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Transdermal implant releases antibodies to trigger immune system to clear Alzheimer’s plaques | KurzweilAI

Transdermal implant releases antibodies to trigger immune system to clear Alzheimer’s plaques | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
EPFL scientists have developed an implantable capsule containing genetically engineered cells that can recruit a patient’s immune system to combat Alzheimer’s disease.

Placed under the skin, the capsule releases antibody proteins that make their way to the brain and “tag” amyloid beta proteins, signalling the patient’s own immune system to attack and clear the amyloid beta proteins, which are toxic to neurons.

To be most effective, this treatment has to be given as early as possible, before the first signs of cognitive decline. Currently, this requires repeated vaccine injections, which can cause side effects. The new implant can deliver a steady, safe flow of antibodies.
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Sleep's Kernel | The Scientist Magazine®

Sleep's Kernel | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Sleep is usually considered a whole-brain phenomenon in which neuronal regulatory circuits impose sleep on the brain. This paradigm has its origins in the historically important work of Viennese neurologist Constantin von Economo, who found that people who suffered from brain infections that damaged the anterior hypothalamus slept less. The finding was a turning point in sleep research, as it suggested that sleep was a consequence of active processes within the brain. This stood in stark contrast to the ideas of renowned St. Petersburg physiologist Ivan Pavlov, who believed that sleep resulted from the passive withdrawal of sensory input. Although the withdrawal of sensory input remains recognized as playing a role in sleep initiation, there is now much evidence supporting the idea that neuronal and glial activity in the anterior hypothalamus leads to the inhibition of multiple excitatory neuronal networks that project widely throughout the brain.
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Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye | The Scientist Magazine®

Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
As many as 40 million people in the U.S. experience some form of insomnia, making it the most common sleep disorder. Sufferers can have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or returning to sleep after waking in the middle of the night, and can experience persistent drowsiness, irritability, anxiety, and difficulty learning and remembering the next day. When chronic, insomnia can impede daily functions and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Insomnia used to be divided into primary insomnia, which is not linked to any other medical condition, and secondary insomnia, trouble sleeping due to an underlying condition such as depression or chronic pain. But in 2013, the American Psychiatric Association eliminated the two subtypes, hoping to bring clinical attention to the sleep disorder regardless of other clinical issues. “There is increasing evidence that insomnia can be a cause or consequence of depression and other issues,” says Charles Morin, a clinical psychologist who studies sleep and insomnia at Laval University in Quebec City.
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New molecule has stem cells primed for harvesting within the hour

New molecule has stem cells primed for harvesting within the hour | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Securing a match for a bone marrow transplant to treat a cancer patient can be difficult enough, but it is not all smooth sailing from that point either. Preparing a donor's stem cells for harvesting involves a lot of time and injections of growth factor to boost stem cell populations ahead of the procedure. But Australian scientists have now unearthed a more direct route, discovering a new molecule that entices an adequate number of stem cells out into the blood stream to make for a much easier, swifter collection.

Doses of chemotherapy to treat cancers like leukaemia can kill of the body's bone marrow, the soft substance inside the bone cavity behind the production of blood cells. Pulling bone marrow cells from a healthy donor and transferring them into the patient can restore their ability to generate blood cells, but this doesn't come without its complications.
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Scientists make significant anti-aging breakthrough

A breakthrough in understanding human skin cells offers a pathway for new anti-ageing treatments.

For the first time, scientists at Newcastle University, UK, have identified that the activity of a key metabolic enzyme found in the batteries of human skin cells declines with age.

A study, published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, has found that the activity of mitochondrial complex II significantly decreases in older skin.

This discovery brings experts a step closer to developing powerful anti-ageing treatments and cosmetic products which may be tailored to counteract the decline in the enzyme's activity levels.

Findings may also lead to a greater understanding of how other organs in the body age, which could pave the way for drug developments in a number of age-related diseases, including cancer.
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Lab-grown eye tissue restores rabbits' vision

Lab-grown eye tissue restores rabbits' vision | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An international team of scientists has used human stem cells to build layers of eye tissue that was then implanted into rabbits to restore vision. With promising early results, the researchers say their findings could usher in trials where such transplantations are put to the test in humans.
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Alzheimer's causes more diverse than previously thought

Alzheimer's causes more diverse than previously thought | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers have been discovering more and more about Alzheimer's disease, and some significant progress has been made in bettering our understanding of the degenerative condition. Now researchers from Lund University in Sweden have shed a little more light on the disease, finding that an excessive buildup of amyloid beta isn't solely linked to hereditory factors. The work could lead to more targeted treatment plans for tackling the disease.

Breakthroughs in our understanding of Alzheimer's occur on a seemingly daily basis, with recent studies examining the mechanism by which brain connections are destroyed in the early stages of the disease, looking to non-invasive ultrasound treatments to combat it, and much more. Despite the pace of progress, there's still a huge amount we don't yet understand about the disease. The new study looked specifically at amyloid beta build up, which leads to an accumulation of plaques, inhibiting nerve function and impairing patient memory.
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Ray Kurzweil talks with host Neal deGrasse Tyson, PhD: on invention & immortality | KurzweilAI

Ray Kurzweil talks with host Neal deGrasse Tyson, PhD: on invention & immortality | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
92 Street Y | 7 Days of Genius
Conversation on stage during the week long event series, held at the historic community center.

featured talk | Ray Kurzweil with host Neil DeGrasse Tyson, PhD — on Invention & Immortality

Inventor, author and futurist Ray Kurzweil is joined by astrophysicist and science communicator Neil deGrasse Tyson, PhD for a discussion of some of the biggest topics of our time. They explore the role of technology in the future, its impact on brain science — and coming innovations in artificial intelligence, energy, life extension and immortality.
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If We Don't Own Our Genes, What Protects Study Subjects in Genetic Research? - Singularity HUB

If We Don't Own Our Genes, What Protects Study Subjects in Genetic Research? - Singularity HUB | Longevity science | Scoop.it
it seems sensible that we would each “own” our genetic information. But the legal reality is quite different. And that could turn out to be a problem because research projects like the Precision Medicine Initiative rely on research participants trusting that their information is protected once they agree to share it.
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Adipocyte-Derived DNA Triggers Inflammation | The Scientist Magazine®

Adipocyte-Derived DNA Triggers Inflammation | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

"Dying fat cells in obese mice release cell-free DNA, recruiting immune cells that can drive chronic inflammation and insulin resistance within adipose tissue, according to a study published today (March 25) in Science Advances. The observed accumulation of macrophages in murine fat tissue depended on the expression of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Obese mice missing TLR9 had fewer macrophages and were more insulin sensitive compared to their TLR9-expressing counterparts. The new work may partly explain how obesity can drive chronic inflammation.

 

“Many mechanisms are involved in obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance,” study coauthor Daiju Fukuda of University of Tokushima, Japan, wrote in an email to The Scientist. “We think that our result is one of [these mechanisms].”

 

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Incredible 'Living' Alzheimer's Implant Clears Mouse Brains of Toxic Junk - Singularity HUB

Incredible 'Living' Alzheimer's Implant Clears Mouse Brains of Toxic Junk - Singularity HUB | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Our helplessness against dementia is especially frustrating, because scientists know how to slow it down if caught early. The answer is passive immunization. Just like vaccines stimulate the body to produce antibodies and protect against various infections, we can introduce antibodies that prevent amyloid proteins from clumping.

In theory, these guardians would circulate the aging brain and protect it from amyloid buildup, especially in people with genetic mutations that increase their chance of developing dementia.
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Is apple cider vinegar really good for you?

Is apple cider vinegar really good for you? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

It turns out there is substantial evidence that consuming vinegar can help keep blood sugar under control, which in turn may ultimately decrease the risk of diabetes and heart disease, among other benefits.

 

Carol S. Johnston, associate director of the nutrition program at Arizona State University, who has been studying the effects of vinegar for more than 10 years, says, “Vinegar appears to inhibit the enzymes that help you digest starch.” When starch is not completely digested, you get a smaller blood sugar (glycemic) response — “20-40% less in healthy people and in diabetics” — after eating a high-glycemic food such as a bagel, according to Johnston’s findings. The vinegar has a more moderate blood-glucose impact when a fiber-rich whole grain is eaten (because there is less of a spike to begin with) and no effect when no starch is eaten.

On top of that...

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Scientists stumble on nerve cell that tells mice when to stop eating

Scientists stumble on nerve cell that tells mice when to stop eating | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Obesity is a big health problem, affecting more than one third – or 78.6 million – adults in the United States, and costing more than US$140 billion dollars to treat every year. A new breakthrough in our understanding of how the brain tells the us that we're full could one day lead to all new tools for tackling the widespread condition. The researchers made the discovery by chance while studying learning and memory systems, instead identifying a new nerve type responsible for controlling appetite in mice.

The team of scientists, made up of researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, weren't actually looking at appetite when the new discovery was made. The study originally focused on learning and memory systems in the brain. More specifically, the researchers were focused on synapse strength, studying proteins that cause the intersections in the brain to become stronger or to weaken.

In the course of the study, an enzyme called OGT was studied in detail.
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Osteoporosis in mice reversed with single injection of stem cells

Osteoporosis in mice reversed with single injection of stem cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Toronto and The Ottawa Hospital had previously found a causal effect between mice developing age-related osteoporosis and a deficiency in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). One of the promising attributes of MSCs is that, while they can grow into different cells in the body just like other stem cells, they can be transplanted without the need for a match.

"We reasoned that if defective MSCs are responsible for osteoporosis, transplantation of healthy MSCs should be able to prevent or treat osteoporosis," says William Stanford, senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and Professor at the University of Ottawa.

To put this reasoning to the test, the scientists injected MSCs into mice with the condition. Six months later, which is one quarter of the life span of the animal, they observed a healthy functional bone in place of the damaged one.
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Cyborg cardiac patch offers alternative to heart transplants

Cyborg cardiac patch offers alternative to heart transplants | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An engineered cardiac patch has been created that incorporates human cells with flexible electronics and a nanocomposite structure to not only replace damaged heart tissue, but also provide remote monitoring, electrical stimulation, and the release of medication on demand. Using electroactive polymers and a combination of biological and engineered parts, the patch contracts and expands just like normal human heart tissue, but regulates those actions with the precision of a finely-tuned machine.

Invented by Professor Tal Dvir and PhD student Ron Feiner of Tel Aviv University (TAU), this new breakthrough medical device is claimed by its creators to have capabilities that surpass those of human tissue alone. As such, this patch may give new hope to people such as those 25 percent on the US national waiting list that may die before a suitable transplant heart becomes available, by effectively offering a way to fix – rather than replace – their own heart.
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New synthesized molecule could reduce brain damage in stroke victims | KurzweilAI

New synthesized molecule could reduce brain damage in stroke victims | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new molecule known as 6S has reduced the death of brain tissue from ischemic stroke by up to 66 percent in rats while reducing the accompaning inflammation, researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the National University of Singapore reported March 9 in an open-access paper published by the journal ACS Central Science.

The inhibitor molecule works by binding to cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), an enzyme that normally helps regulate cellular function, but can also trigger production of toxic levels of hydrogen sulfide in the brain. (That buildup initiates brain damage after strokes by disrupting blood flow, which prevents oxygen and glucose from reaching brain tissue, ultimately killing neurons and other cells.)

The researchers modeled the inhibitor on a naturally occurring molecule produced by the CBS enzyme, tailoring the molecule’s structure to improve its performance.* That increased the inhibitor’s binding time from less than a second to hours.
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Obesity, Diabetes, and Epigenetic Inheritance | The Scientist Magazine®

Obesity, Diabetes, and Epigenetic Inheritance | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
While scientists have identified several genetic risk factors for diabetes and obesity, some have proposed epigenetic alterations in gametes as another potential mechanism of disease risk inheritance. Now, a mouse study by researchers in Germany provides new evidence in support of this epigenetic inheritance theory, showing that different diets in otherwise identical mice can determine glucose intolerance and obesity risk in offspring via egg and sperm cells. The team’s findings were published today (March 14) in Nature Genetics.

“The view so far was that [risk] is all determined by genes—it’s fate,” said study coauthor Johannes Beckers of the Helmholtz Zentrum München. “But our findings give back a certain responsibility to the parents. They really have the possibility to affect what offspring inherit in their epigenome.”

Approximately 90 percent of nearly 350 million cases of diabetes worldwide are classified as type 2.
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Brown cell-booster flicks the fat switch

Brown cell-booster flicks the fat switch | Longevity science | Scoop.it
That the human body contains good fat and bad fat has been known to scientists for some time, but mechanisms that allow us to convert one into the other have been a little harder to come by. In search of such a trigger, scientists have uncovered a switch in the fat cells of mice that helps them shed the extra pounds. The good news? That very same switch is present in humans.

Science has teased us with a so-called fat switch for years. White fat cells, which are the culprits behind obesity, store the energy that we don't use in what we see as love handles and beer bellies. Brown fat cells on the other hand, play the useful role of burning fat to produce heat and keep us warm. Research into how we can trick the body into generating more brown fat cells has produced some promising discoveries, like hormones that mimic the effects of exercise, for example.
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Who Sleeps? | The Scientist Magazine®

Who Sleeps? | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In the last 15 years, research on invertebrate sleep has exploded, with Drosophila now serving as a powerful model system to probe the function of sleep. In insects, as in mammals and birds, most researchers believe sleep serves an important role in memory formation and retention. In 2011, Shaw’s group found that stimulating a group of neurons in the fly brain called the dorsal fan-shaped body could put flies to sleep, and in doing so induce the formation of a long-term memory (Science, 332:1571-76, 2011). And last year Shaw and colleagues were able to reverse memory deficits in a Drosophila strain that was learning-disabled, as well as in a fly model of Alzheimer’s disease, simply by inducing sleep (Curr Biol, 25:1270-81, 2015). “Somehow sleep is able to fix the brain,” Shaw says.

Research has also revealed the importance of sleep for learning and memory in honeybees, which must remember the locations of multiple food sources and communicate that information to their hive mates. Last year, Randolf Menzel of the Free University of Berlin and his colleagues presented sleeping honeybees with an odor cue they had experienced during awake learning, and this improved their memory performance after they woke up (Curr Biol, 25:2869-74, 2015). “It’s a brilliant study,” says Shaw. “Just like humans and rats—it’s incredible.”
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CRISPR enhancements: improving the ability to delete genes | KurzweilAI

CRISPR enhancements: improving the ability to delete genes | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Lauded as a groundbreaking technology that allows scientists to modify genes* for many different applications, CRISPR/Cas9 has hit stormy waters over the ethics of editing human embryos. Although the technology is faster and cheaper than past gene editing techniques, one of the problems cited is that the efficiency of deleting unwanted genes is low and that it gives inconsistent results — an unacceptable risk when using human embryos.

Haoquan Wu, PhD, from the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, has worked to improve CRISPR’s overall ability to target and eliminate genes.

In an open-access paper published in Genome Biology, senior author Wu and his team describe how they were able to significantly improve the efficiency of gene knockout (deletion) by creating structural changes to the CRISPR RNA guide molecule.**
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