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New cancer treatment beats chemotherapy without the toxic side effects

New cancer treatment beats chemotherapy without the toxic side effects | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new treatment for lymphoma and leukemia is more effective than chemotherapy, and avoids the toxic side effects.
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Augustino Muthoka's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:11 AM

THIS IS GOOD NEWS... >> 

New cancer treatment beats chemotherapy without the toxic side effects..
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Hormone therapy in the 50s not linked to memory loss

Hormone replacement therapy during the early stages of menopause - typically around age 50 - doesn't hurt or help brain function, according to a new study.

 

Researchers found that women between the ages of 50 and 55 years old who took estrogen or estrogen with progesterone performed just as well on tests that measure memory problems as women of the same age who took a placebo.

 

 

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Dental health for tweens

Dental health for tweens | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Healthy tips for teeth, beyond avoiding sugar. 

 

Some that may surprise:

Tomatoes can degrade tooth enamel.

Parsley can help prevent decay.

Apples neutralize acids.

Chewing ice can contribute to bacteria build-up

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Upregulation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway i... [J Cell Biochem. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

"Results showed that curcumin induces growth arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Its effect was more obvious on the highly COX-2 expressing cell line..."

 

 

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Biotivia Longevity's curator insight, June 26, 2013 6:24 PM

Curcumin features a lot in research studies. Men with prostate concerns could look into adding curcumin to their diet. Curcumin is an active ingredient of the spice turmeric.

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ORAC's tarnished reputation doesn't diminish polyphenols' health benefits, expert says

ORAC's tarnished reputation doesn't diminish polyphenols' health benefits, expert says | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It has been almost a year since United States Department of Agriculture took down its ORAC database.  Now that this official reference point is gone, does this measure of antioxidant potential still have relevance in the marketplace?
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Using the ORAC scale to understand antioxidant content in relative terms can still be useful. Comparing foods on this scale provides information that you can use to rank foods and evaluate the health benefits of a particular fruit or benefit in relation to others.

 

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Measuring the human pulse from tiny head movements to help diagnose cardiac disease | KurzweilAI

Measuring the human pulse from tiny head movements to help diagnose cardiac disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a new algorithm that can accurately measure the heart rates of people depicted in ordinary digital video by analyzing imperceptibly small head movements that accompany the rush of blood caused by the heart’s contractions.

 

In tests, the algorithm gave pulse measurements that were consistently within a few beats per minute of those produced by electrocardiograms (EKGs). It was also able to provide useful estimates of the time intervals between beats, a measurement that can be used to identify patients at risk for cardiac events.

 

A video-based pulse-measurement system could be useful for monitoring newborns or the elderly, whose sensitive skin could be damaged by frequent attachment and removal of EKG leads.

 

 

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The Bank Where Doctors Can Stash Your Genome

The Bank Where Doctors Can Stash Your Genome | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new company offers a “gene vault” for doctors who want to add genomics to patient care.

 

Genomic sequencing might be more common in medicine if doctors had a simple way to send for the test and keep track of the data.

 

That’s the hope of Coriell Life Sciences in Camden, N.J., a startup that grew out of a partnership between the Coriell Institute for Medical Research and IBM. The company wants to facilitate the process of ordering, storing and interpreting whole-genome-sequence data for doctors. The company launched in January and is now working with different health-care providers to set up its service.

 

“The intent is that the doctor would order a test like any other diagnostic test they order today,” says Scott Megill, president of Coriell Life Sciences. The company would facilitate sequencing the patient’s DNA (through existing sequencing companies such as Illumina or Ion Torrent), store it in its so-called gene vault, and act as the middleman between doctors and companies that offer interpretation services. Finally, “we will return the genetic result in the human readable form back to the electronic medical record so the doctor can read it and interpret it for the patient,” says Megill.

 

“You need a robust software infrastructure for storing, analyzing, and presenting information,” says Jon Hirsch, who founded Syapse, a California-based company developing software to analyze biological data sets for diagnosing patients. “Until that gets built, you can generate all the data you want, but it’s not going to have any impact outside the few major centers of genomics medicine,” he says.

 

The company will use a board of scientific advisors to guide them to the best interpretation programs available. “No one company is in position to interpret the entire genome for its meaning,” says Michael Christman, CEO of the Coriell Institute for Medical Research. “But by having one’s sequence in the gene vault, then the physician will be able to order interpretative engines, analogous to apps for the iPhone,” he says. Doctors could order an app to analyze a patient’s genome for DNA variants linked to poor drug response at one point, and later on, order another for variants linked to heart disease.

 

The cloud-based workflow could help doctors in different locations take advantage of expert interpretations anywhere, says Christman. “This would allow a doctor who’s at a community clinic in Tulsa, Okla., order an interpretation of breast cancer sequences derived at Sloan Kettering,” he says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Pluripotent cells from pancreatic cancer cells first human model of cancer's progression

Pluripotent cells from pancreatic cancer cells first human model of cancer's progression | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Pennsylvania scientists have used stem-cell technology to create a research cell line from a patient with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma(PDAC).

 

This first-of-its-kind human-cell model of pancreatic cancer progression was published this week in Cell Reports from the lab of Ken Zaret, PhD, professor of Cell and Developmental Biology.

 

"It is the first example using induced pluripotent stem [iPS] cells to model cancer progression directly from a solid tumor, and the first human cell line that can model pancreatic cancer progression from early to invasive stages," says Zaret, also the associate director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

 

 

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Sunscreen is valuable, but different types produce different results

Sunscreen is valuable, but different types produce different results | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Physical or chemical sunscreen... Do you know the difference and the proper application?

 

Many of us find false comfort in high SPFs or do not reapply often enough to protect from free radicals.

 

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The Avatar Will See You Now: Medical Centers Are Testing New, Friendly Ways To Reduce Office Visits

The Avatar Will See You Now: Medical Centers Are Testing New, Friendly Ways To Reduce Office Visits | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Most patients who enter the gym of the San Mateo Medical Center in California are there to work with physical therapists. But a few who had knee replacements are being coached by a digital avatar instead.

 

The avatar, Molly, interviews them in Spanish or English about the levels of pain they feel as a video guides them through exercises, while the 3-D cameras of a Kinect device measure their movements. Because it’s a pilot project, Paul Carlisle, the director of rehabilitation services, looks on. But the ultimate goal is for the routine to be done from a patient’s home.

 

“It would change our whole model,” says Carlisle, who is running the trial as the public hospital looks for creative ways to extend the reach of its overtaxed budget and staff. “We don’t want to replace therapists. But in some ways, it does replace the need to have them there all the time.”

 

Receiving remote medical care is becoming more common as technologies improve and health records get digitized. Sense.ly, the California startup running the trial, is one of more than 500 companies using health-care tools fromNuance, a company that develops speech-recognition and virtual-assistant software. “Our goal is basically to capture the patient’s state of mind and body,” says Ivana Schnur, cofounder of Sense.ly and a clinical psychologist who has spent years developing virtual-reality tools in medicine and mental health.

 

Using Sense.ly’s platform, patients can communicate their condition to an emotionally reactive avatar through their phone, desktop, or TV. The avatar asks the patient simple questions, and if programmed by a doctor, it can answer questions too—such as what a diabetes patient with high blood-sugar readings should eat that day. The software also collects data from other medical devices that a patient uses, such as a glucose meter, and can capture gestures with a Kinect. The reports sent to the doctor include red-flag notifications to act on right away; charts, graphs, and analytics tracing the patient’s progress over time; and a transcript of the voice interaction.

 

“A physician’s time is always limited,” says Benjamin Kanter, chief medical information officer at Palomar Health in San Diego. “For a long time, we’ve had the challenge of just getting information into the system. Now the system is starting to actually help me.”

 

Schnur says one real advance is the avatar itself, which is important in helping both patients and doctors to trust the interactions. Molly, still a work in progress, can modulate her tone of voice and facial expressions. Schnur says that sometimes patients are more willing to share sensitive information with a nonjudgmental avatar than with a doctor.

 

Patients in San Mateo seem to like the interaction, Carlisle says, and he does too: “I’ve gotten used to the avatar. I look forward to seeing it when it comes online.”

 

The Sense.ly software, currently in beta, is also being tested at an addiction and detox clinic in California, doing patient intake and assessment in a crowded waiting room. Schnur hopes the system will eventually be used for even more complex tasks. The company, a product of the French telecommunication company Orange’s Silicon Valley incubator program, is working to include additional features, such as the ability to interpret and respond to a patient’s facial expressions.

 

Of course, doctors see some risks in such approaches, especially if the software makes an error or misinterprets an interaction. Kanter points out that although electronic systems often reduce errors, any errors that occur can propagate more quickly than those made only on paper.

 

Carlisle, who will enroll 50 to 60 patients by the time the study is done, is looking forward to getting more data. Over time, he hopes, not only will he improve the care of individual patients in their home environments, but what he learns from the data will improve therapy for everyone.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Special coating could allow electronic implants to detect organ rejection

Special coating could allow electronic implants to detect organ rejection | Longevity science | Scoop.it

If physicians have a sufficiently-early warning that a patient’s body is rejecting a transplanted organ, then there’s a good chance that they can stop the process via medication. Implanted electronic sensors could serve to provide that warning as early as possible, and thanks to new research, they’re coming a step closer to practical use.

 

 

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Supreme Court OKs patenting of human DNA if synthetic

Supreme Court OKs patenting of human DNA if synthetic | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In a first of its kind ruling on human genes, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday decided that synthetically produced genetic material can be patented but naturally occurring DNA extracted from the human body cannot.

 

 

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Breathing problems may cause insomnia without your realizing it

Breathing problems may cause insomnia without your realizing it | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Middle-of-the-night awakenings are common for many people, and how we deal with this habit is key to getting a good sleep, says sleep expert Michael Grandner, a psychologist at the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

 

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PIP Biosensor Measures Stress and Gamifies the Art of Conscious Relaxation

PIP Biosensor Measures Stress and Gamifies the Art of Conscious Relaxation | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Most of us know when we’re stressed. Physical cues like stomach butterflies, a flushed face, or muscle tension are hard to miss. Problem is, said symptoms can be very difficult to control. Once going—these things tend to snowball.
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Rise in high-end treatment for low-risk prostate cancer

The proportion of U.S. men with early, slow-growing prostate cancer who received robotic surgery and other expensive treatments increased between 2004 and 2009, according to a new study.

 

Researchers found that use of those therapies also rose among men who were unlikely to die from prostate cancer because they were sick with other chronic diseases when their cancer was diagnosed.

 

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Weight Loss Doesn't Help Heart Health For Diabetics In Study : NPR

Weight Loss Doesn't Help Heart Health For Diabetics In Study : NPR | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers were surprised to find that people with Type 2 diabetes who lost a lot of weight didn't lower their risk of heart attacks or strokes. They did have better control of their blood sugar and saw other health benefits.
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How Machine Learning and Big Data Are Changing the Face of Biological Sciences

Until recently, the wet lab has been a crucial component of every biologist. Today's advances in the production of massive amounts of data and the creation of machine-learning algorithms for processing that data are changing the face of biological science—making it possible to do real science without a wet lab. David Heckerman shares several examples of how this transformation in the area of genomics is changing the pace of scientific breakthroughs.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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davidgibson's curator insight, May 28, 2013 8:05 PM

This 36 min video is well worth the time spent - to get an idea (hopefully a transferrable one) about Big Data and the frontiers of science. In this case both "wet lab" (test tubes microscopes) and "dry lab" (computer modeling with machine learning) and needed and so is content as well as computational literacy.

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New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI

New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), investigators found that epithelial cells — the type that form a barrier between the inside and the outside of the body, such as skin cells — move in a group, propelled by forces both from within and from nearby cells — to fill any unfilled spaces they encounter.

 

The discovery about how cells move inside the body may provide scientists with crucial information about disease mechanisms such as the spread of cancer or the constriction of airways caused by asthma.

 

 

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Epigallocatechin gallate changes mRNA expression l... [Br J Nutr. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Catechins, compounds derived from green tea, have been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function...

 

 

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Studies show that green tea extract contains polyphenols that can activate genes to help the liver process and neutralize cholesterol.

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Reversing the loss of brain connections in Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI

Reversing the loss of brain connections in Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The first experimental drug to boost brain synapses lost in Alzheimer’s disease has been developed by researchers at Sanford-Burnham.

 

The drug, called NitroMemantine, combines two FDA-approved medicines to stop the destructive cascade of changes in the brain that destroys the connections between neurons, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline.

 

 

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Metabolic syndrome has declined, some risks persist

Compared to a decade ago, fewer Americans have a cluster of risk factors that together can signal heart troubles and diabetes down the line, according to a new study.

 

But while so-called metabolic syndrome is declining, some of its components - including large waistlines and poor blood sugar control, which carry their own risks - are becoming more common, researchers found.

 

 

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Osteoporosis drug stops growth of breast cancer cells, even in resistant tumors, study suggests

Osteoporosis drug stops growth of breast cancer cells, even in resistant tumors, study suggests | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A drug approved in Europe to treat osteoporosis has now been shown to stop the growth of breast cancer cells, even in cancers that have become resistant to current targeted therapies, according to a Duke Cancer Institute study.

 

The findings, presented June 15, 2013, at the annual Endocrine Society meeting in San Francisco, indicate that the drug bazedoxifene packs a powerful one-two punch that not only prevents estrogen from fueling breast cancer cell growth, but also flags the estrogen receptor for destruction.

 

 

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Curcumin: New studies support brain and cardiovascular benefits

Curcumin: New studies support brain and cardiovascular benefits | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Daily supplements of curcumin – the natural pigment that gives the spice turmeric its yellow color – may support healthy aging, with two new studies indicating benefits for arterial aging and cognition.
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We carry a unique formula that uses a patented extract of curcumin and specialized extraction process for maximum bioavailability.

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Experimental procedure shows promise for treatment of MS

Experimental procedure shows promise for treatment of MS | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An international team of scientists has recently reported success in the first phase of clinical trials in which MS victims’ immune systems were conditioned to become much more tolerant of myelin.\

 

In the study, white blood cells were obtained from nine MS-afflicted test subjects. These cells were specially processed, coupled with myelin antigens, and then injected intravenously back into their respective donors – up to 3 billion of these dead, treated cells were injected into each person.

 

When they entered the spleen, which filters dead cells from the bloodstream, both the white blood cells themselves and their myelin antigen payloads were identified by the body as being innocuous. This caused the immune system to become 50 to 75 percent less reactive to myelin, depending on the person and the number of cells injected.

 

 

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Piezo-resistive fibers enable "blood pressure watch" with continuous monitoring

Piezo-resistive fibers enable "blood pressure watch" with continuous monitoring | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New “blood pressure watch” relies on a wristband made from piezo-resistive fibers developed at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA). These fibers measure the contact pressure of the device on the skin to overcome the problem of the device slipping on the wrist or muscle tension that can affect the measurements.

 

 

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