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Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Microprinting low-cost artificial cells | KurzweilAI

Microprinting low-cost artificial cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Schematic representation of production of arrays of controlled-size artificial cells by combining hydrogel stamping and electroformation techniques Easily
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Cells taken from the retina are inkjet-printed for the first time | KurzweilAI

Cells taken from the retina are inkjet-printed for the first time | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

UK researchers have used inkjet printing technology to successfully print ganglion cells and glial cells taken from the eye for the very first time.

 

The breakthrough could lead to the production of artificial tissue grafts made from the variety of cells found in the human retina and may aid in the search to cure blindness.

 

 

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eTriage armbands could get disaster victims treated faster

eTriage armbands could get disaster victims treated faster | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When emergency response crews have to deal with many casualties at once, one of the first things they do is set up a triage system. It's a system that works...
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Five-fold lifespan extension in C. Elegans by combining mutants | KurzweilAI

Five-fold lifespan extension in C. Elegans by combining mutants | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

New research published published online in Cell Reports on December 12, 2013 (open access) with the nematode C. elegans suggests that combining mutants can lead to radical lifespan extension.

 

Scientists at the Buck Institute combined mutations in two pathways well known for lifespan extension and report a synergistic five-fold extension of longevity — these worms lived to the human equivalent of 400 to 500 years — introducing the possibility of combination therapy for aging and the maladies associated with it.

 

 

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Researchers unlock how vitamin D may benefit people with multiple sclerosis

Researchers unlock how vitamin D may benefit people with multiple sclerosis | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Vitamin D may block damage-causing immune cells from migrating to the central nervous system, offering a potential explanation for why the so-called 'sunshine vitamin' may prevent or ease symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new...
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Cancer deaths rise to 8.2 million, breast cancer sharply up

Cancer deaths rise to 8.2 million, breast cancer sharply up | Longevity science | Scoop.it
LONDON (Reuters) - The global death toll from cancer rose to 8.2 million in 2012 with sharp rises in breast cancer as the disease tightened its grip in developing nations struggling to treat an illness...
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Forcing cancer cells to shape-shift stops them from migrating, Mayo Clinic researchers find | KurzweilAI

Forcing cancer cells to shape-shift stops them from migrating, Mayo Clinic researchers find | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have identified a number of agents — some already used in the clinic for different disorders — that may force shape-shifting in tumor cells to immobilize them and thus prevent metastasis.

 

“We are starting to understand mechanistically how cancer cells move and migrate, which gives us opportunities to manipulate these cells, alter their shape, and stop their spread,” says the study’s lead investigator, Panos Z. Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

 

 

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BPA is still everywhere, and mounting evidence suggests harmful effects

BPA is still everywhere, and mounting evidence suggests harmful effects | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Studies continue to add to the evidence that the safety of BPA is highly uncertain.

 

... Even at low levels and particularly during prenatal development and early childhood, exposure to BPA — known to mimic the hormone estrogen — can have subtle but detrimental effects.

 

When chemicals such as BPA mimic hormones, it leads to what’s called endocrine disruption.

 

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Drugs to fix "misfolded" proteins could cure a range of diseases

Drugs to fix "misfolded" proteins could cure a range of diseases | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Proteins adopt their functional three-dimensional structure by the folding of a linear chain of amino acids. Gene mutation can cause this folding process to go awry, resulting in "misfolded" proteins that are inactive or, in worse cases, exhibit modified or toxic functionality. This is the cause of a wide range of diseases, but researchers have developed a technique that fixes these misfolded proteins, allowing them to perform their intended function, thereby providing a potential cure for a number of diseases.

 

Up until relatively recently, scientists believed that misfolded proteins that were inactive were intrinsically non-functional. However, it was discovered that their inactivity was due to the cell's quality control system misrouting them within the cell. Drugs called "pharmacoperones," which get their name from their ability to act as so-called "protein chaperones," have the ability to enter cells and fix the misfolded proteins so they can be routed correctly, thus restoring their functionality.

 

 

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An electronic diagnostic pill for detecting early-stage gastric cancer | KurzweilAI

An electronic diagnostic pill for detecting early-stage gastric cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Chongqing University in China have adapted capsule endoscopy to allow for detecting tiny quantities of “occult” blood for screening of early-stage gastric cancer.

 

The data is automatically transmitted to an external monitoring device in real time for diagnosis by a physician.

 

The non-invasive Gastric Occult Blood (GOB) capsule, which carries inside a detector, power supply, and wireless transmitter, is encased in non-toxic, acid-safe polycarbonate. The device has a detection limit of 6 micrograms per liter of fluid. Laboratory tests have demonstrated its simplicity and reliability, the researchers say.

 

 

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Nanodiamond quantum sensors pave way to MRI for living cells | KurzweilAI

Nanodiamond quantum sensors pave way to MRI for living cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By exploiting flaws in nanoscale diamond fragments, researchers say they have created precise quantum sensors in a biocompatible material.

 

Nanoscopic thermal and magnetic field detectors that could be inserted into living cells could enhance our understanding of everything from chemical reactions within single cells to signaling in neural networks and the origin of magnetism in novel materials.

 

 

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Rehabilitative device bridges the gap between stroke victims' brains and hands

Rehabilitative device bridges the gap between stroke victims' brains and hands | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We've recently seen rehabilitative systems in which stroke victims use their thoughts either to move animated images of their paralyzed limbs, or to activate robotic devices that guide their limbs through the desired movements.

 

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, however, have just announced an alternative approach. Their device acts as an intermediary between the brain and a non-responsive hand, receiving signals from the one and transmitting them to the other.

 

 

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Today's elderly may be mentally sharper than yesterday's

Today's elderly may be mentally sharper than yesterday's | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Elderly people today might be more mentally nimble than their counterparts were a decade or two ago, according to a new European study.

 

Researchers found people who were in their 80s when they took thinking and memory tests in the late 2000s performed similarly to others who were tested more than 10 years earlier while in their 70s.

 

 

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Lung cancer breathalyzer to be trialed at UK pharmacies

Lung cancer breathalyzer to be trialed at UK pharmacies | Longevity science | Scoop.it

With lung cancer survival rates greatly improved by early detection, we've seen a number of efforts to develop a better way to detect the disease in its early stages. So-called lung cancer breathalyzers are one technology being developed by a number of research teams, including one from the University of Huddersfield in the UK, which plans to trial a breathalyzer device in pharmacies.

 

The project to develop the device, which is taking place over three years, involves researching a lung cancer "biomarker signature" that is detectable in breath. Previous studies have already shown that carbon-based sensors embedded with gold nanoparticles and even dogs can detect chemicals in the breath indicating the presence of the disease in the lungs.

 

 

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Paul Joseph Smith's curator insight, December 30, 2013 11:35 PM

lung cancer

Thomas Faltin's curator insight, December 31, 2013 6:23 AM

add your insight...

   
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smartCARD lets users check their cholesterol via an iPhone

smartCARD lets users check their cholesterol via an iPhone | Longevity science | Scoop.it

lthough a lot of people are concerned about monitoring their cholesterol levels, probably not many of those people want to head off to a clinic or use an expensive, complicated device to get those levels tested every few days. Soon, however, they may not have to. Scientists from Cornell University have developed a gadget called the smartCARD, that allows users to easily check their own cholesterol using their iPhone.

 

The smartCARD (smartphone Cholesterol Application for Rapid Diagnostics) attaches over top of the phone's camera, and has a slot in it which receives a standard test strip.

 

 

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New artificial cartilage mimics strength and suppleness of native cartilage | KurzweilAI

New artificial cartilage mimics strength and suppleness of native cartilage | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A Duke research team has developed a better synthetic replacement cartilage in joints that mimics both the strength and suppleness of native cartilage.

 

An article by lead authors Farshid Guilak, a professor of orthopedic surgery and biomedical engineering, and Xuanhe Zhao, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, appears today, Dec. 17 in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

 

 

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Evidence Mounts for Gene Therapy as Treatment for Heart Failure

Evidence Mounts for Gene Therapy as Treatment for Heart Failure | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Doctors are quite good at bringing patients back from the swelling and exhaustion of heart failure, which affectsnearly 30 million people worldwide. But there’s little they can do with conventional approaches to repair the damage done to their hearts.

 

That’s why damage done to the vital organ by heart failure has been the focus of much research into gene therapy, a process in which patients receive, usually inside an inert virus, replacement genes for those suspected of causing an illness.

 

One genetic treatment has gotten as far as clinical trials in patients with heart failure, and initial results presented recently at an American Heart Association meeting, suggest that the gene therapy may just help hearts damaged by heart failure heal themselves.

 

 

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New X-ray tech provides clear view of soft tissues

New X-ray tech provides clear view of soft tissues | Longevity science | Scoop.it

X-ray machines are all large devices that can only image hard structures such as bone, unless a contrast-enhancing solution such as barium is present in the patient ... right? Well, no, not all of them. A new system developed by researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital is small enough to be considered portable, doesn't expose patients to as much radiation, and can image soft tissues in minute detail.

 

Ordinarily, X-ray machines emit beams of electromagnetic radiation from a single source. The experimental new machine, however, utilizes "a nanostructured surface with an array of tiny tips," each one of those micron-sized tips emitting its own beam of electrons. Those beams pass through a microstructured plate, and are converted into X-rays.

 

 

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AdnanD's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:57 AM

I've been waiting for this for a long long ... long time 

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Scientists treat disabled rats by "bridging the gap" in their brains

Scientists treat disabled rats by "bridging the gap" in their brains | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Victims of traumatic brain injuries often lose the ability to perform certain actions, due to the fact that two or more regions of their brain are no longer able to communicate with one another. However, in the same way that a spliced-in wire can circumvent a broken electrical connection, scientists have recently demonstrated that an electronic brain-machine-brain interface can restore lost abilities to brain-damaged rats. The research could lead to the development of prosthetic devices for treatment of injured humans.

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BioPen: A handheld 3D printer for surgeons

BioPen: A handheld 3D printer for surgeons | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Devices like the 3Doodler and SwissPen literally put 3D printing technology in the hands of consumers, but a new BioPen developed at the University of Wollongong (UOW) in Australia is targeted at more skilled hands. The handheld device is designed to let surgeons "draw" live cells and growth factors directly onto the site of an injury to help accelerate the regeneration of functional bone and cartilage.

 

 

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Neural prosthesis restores normal behavior after brain injury | KurzweilAI

Neural prosthesis restores normal behavior after brain injury | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from Case Western Reserve University and University of Kansas Medical Center have restored behavior — in this case, the ability to reach through a narrow opening and grasp food — using a neural prosthesis in a brain-injured rat.

 

Ultimately, the team hopes to develop a device that rapidly and substantially improves function after brain injury in humans.

 

There is no such commercial treatment for the 1.5 million Americans, including soldiers in Afghanistan and Iraq, who suffer traumatic brain injuries (TBI), or the nearly 800,000 stroke victims who suffer weakness or paralysis in the U.S. annually.

 

 

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Scientists convert human stem cells into functional lung cells

Scientists convert human stem cells into functional lung cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have transformed human stem cells into functional lung cells, paving the way for ultimately creating bioengineered lungs using the patient's own cells. Besides being able to generate lung tissue for transplants, these cells could also be used to study lung development and potentially find more advanced treatments for lung diseases.

 

While scientists have been able to successfully transform human stem cells into different types of cells such as nerve, retina and blood cells, creating working lung and airway cells proved to be a challenge.

 

 

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Reduced microbiota diversity linked to colorectal cancer risk: Study

Reduced microbiota diversity linked to colorectal cancer risk: Study | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A decreased diversity of microbes found in the human gut microbiota is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, say researchers.
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Prototype sensor belt records world's longest non-invasive ECG

Prototype sensor belt records world's longest non-invasive ECG | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Although electrocardiograms (ECGs) can help predict cardiac emergencies as much as several months before a potentially life-threatening episode, this usually requires being hooked up to an ECG machine for a period of time at a doctor's office or hospital. A new sensor belt prototype allows an ECG to be recorded around the clock for up to six months, increasing the chances a problem will be discovered and treated before an emergency strikes.

 

Electrocardiograms (ECGs) non-invasively measure the heart's electrical conduction system using electrodes attached to the skin. In this way, they are able to measure heartbeat rate and regularity over time. The sensor belt, developed by researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany, is able to do this continuously over a very long period and also measures breathing frequency and activity.

 

 

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Magnesium may help people with heart problems to live longer

Magnesium may help people with heart problems to live longer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increased intakes of magnesium may help people with a high cardiovascular risk to live longer, according to a new study from Spain.
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