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Smartphone Physicals Are Taking Off With Explosion of Apps, Attachments

Smartphone Physicals Are Taking Off With Explosion of Apps, Attachments | Longevity science | Scoop.it

There’s no shortage of smartphone appsto help people track their health. And in recent months, medical apps have started growing up, leaving behind the novelty of attaching probes to a smartphone to offer, they hope, serious clinical tools.

 

Last month in a Ted Talk, Shiv Gaglani showed that a standard physical exam can now be done using only smartphone apps and attachments. From blood pressure cuff to stethoscope and otoscope — the thing the doctor uses to look in your ears — all of the doctor’s basic instruments are now available in “smart” format.

 

 

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odysseas spyroglou's curator insight, November 30, 2013 1:10 PM

Smartphones in the service of health industry.

Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Reinvent Yourself: The Playboy Interview with Ray Kurzweil

Reinvent Yourself: The Playboy Interview with Ray Kurzweil | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Many think author, inventor and data scientist Ray Kurzweil is a prophet for our digital age. A few say he’s completely nuts. Kurzweil, who heads a team of more than 40 as a director of engineering at Google, believes advances in technology and medicine are pushing us toward what he calls the Singularity, a period of profound cultural and evolutionary change in which computers will outthink the brain and allow people—you, me, the guy with the man-bun ahead of you at Starbucks—to live forever. He dates this development at 2045.
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Compound reverses symptoms of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's in fruit flies

Compound reverses symptoms of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's in fruit flies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's are extremely widespread, affecting millions of people across the planet, but treatments are limited, and there's currently no cure available.

 

New work is showing promise in the development of a new treatment, with scientists identifying a compound that can reverse symptoms of the diseases. The method hasn't been tested on human patients just yet, but it's been found to be effective in genetically modified fruit flies.

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Two-Way Traffic | The Scientist Magazine®

Two-Way Traffic | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Five years ago, scientists at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City showed that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could both colonize metastatic sites and travel back to their tumors of origin. Taking advantage of this bidirectional CTC movement, researchers at the University of New Mexico and their colleagues injected mice with CTCs that were genetically modified (GM) to express an anticancer cytokine. The team found that these GM CTCs were able to home to tumors and release the cytokine, leading to decreased tumor growth. The results, published February 8 in PNAS, suggest that cancer cells may be useful tools for anticancer therapies.
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First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy | The Scientist Magazine®

First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Telomere length. There is not clear evidence that says longer telomeres will equate to longer life. But now there is a bit of human data to examine.

 

The first clinical studies using a gene therapy to stall aging and increase health span have been carried out by BioViva.

Previous research has demonstrated that gene therapy could both delay disease and extend longevity in mice. Researchers went on to demonstrate that telomerase gene therapy can abate certain age-related diseases in mice as well.

 

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Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing | The Scientist Magazine®

Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Now, researchers have developed a new way to test pain—and, potentially, other sensory-targeting medications. Edward Stevens and James Bilsland of the Pfizer’s U.K.-based neuroscience and pain research units and their colleagues have shown that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from blood samples of patients with a pain disorder can be used to create sensory neurons that recapitulate the disease phenotype. Testing a novel pain inhibitor on the patient-derived, iPSC-based neurons, the researchers recapitulated the sensitivity to the drug seen in the corresponding patients in a clinical trial.

The team’s results, published this week (April 20) in Science Translational Medicine, suggest that such a stem cell-based approach may be useful to study nerve dysfunction. “We hope this approach will have wide application to many pain states and translate to other therapeutic areas,” Stevens wrote in an email to The Scientist.
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Vinpocetine Helps with Urinary Incontinence

Vinpocetine Helps with Urinary Incontinence | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Vinpocetine’s Five Modes of Action

There has been much research on vinpocetine’s physiological actions, which fall into five categories:


>Selective enhancement of cerebral circulation and oxygen utilization (without significantly affecting these functions throughout the rest of the body).

 

>Significant increase in the brain’s tolerance of hypoxia (impaired oxygen supply), a condition that can contribute to dementia.

 

>An anticonvulsant effect, which might prove useful in the treatment of epilepsy (see the sidebar).

 

>Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-1 (PDE-1), which is one of a large family of enzymes, the phosphodiesterases, that play vital roles in various biological processes, especially the regulation of smooth-muscle tone.

 

>Improvement of the flow properties of blood by making red blood cells more deformable, and inhibition of platelet aggregation, which can lead to blood clots.

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Mia's curator insight, April 28, 4:02 PM
Ahhh, plants- Mother Nature's remedies. Sooooo soothing and perfect....IF IT WEREN'TFOR COLONY COLLAPSE DISORDER AND GLOBAL WARMING!!!!!!
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Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep | The Scientist Magazine®

Brain Keeps Watch During Sleep | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When it comes to bedding down in an unfamiliar place, the old adage about sleeping with one eye open may not be that far from the truth. New research helps explain this “first-night effect,” finding that one brain hemisphere remains more active than the other, researchers at Brown University and their colleagues reported today (April 21) in Current Biology.

“It’s an interesting finding,” Steven Stufflebeam, a neuroradiologist at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, told The Scientist. “They found . . . one hemisphere of the brain was in a more vigilant state during the first night of sleep,” said Stufflebeam, who was not involved in the research.
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“Hunger Hormone” No More? | The Scientist Magazine®

“Hunger Hormone” No More? | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Transgenic mice with an overactive form of the receptor for ghrelin—often dubbed the “hunger hormone”—do not have the increased appetites one might expect, yet still gain weight, according to a paper published yesterday (April 19) in Science Signaling. The results suggest that the long-held view of ghrelin as a regulator of food intake may not be entirely accurate. But not everyone is convinced.

“It’s an intellectually intriguing finding,” said Yale School of Medicine’s Tamas Horvath who was not involved in the study. “Am I 100 percent convinced that this proves that ghrelin has no effect on feeding? No. But I think that [the authors] come up with a provocative set of data and I think . . . it’s going to initiate more thorough studies on this important question,” he added.
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Human data supports acai’s antioxidant activity in healthy women

Human data supports acai’s antioxidant activity in healthy women | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Supplementing the diet of healthy women with açai pulp may boost the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and reduce the production of reactive oxygen species, Brazilian researchers report.
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Ray Kurzweil Predicts Three Technologies Will Define Our Future

Ray Kurzweil Predicts Three Technologies Will Define Our Future | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Many observers first noticed this acceleration with the advent of modern microchips, but as Ray Kurzweil wrote in his book The Singularity Is Near, we can find a number of eerily similar trends in other areas too.

According to Kurzweil’s law of accelerating returns, technological progress is moving ahead at an exponential rate, especially in information technologies.

This means today’s best tools will help us build even better tools tomorrow, fueling this acceleration.
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Guts and Glory | The Scientist Magazine®

Guts and Glory | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Clevers studied T- and B-cell signaling; he set up assays to visualize calcium ion flux and demonstrated that the ions act as messengers to activate human B cells, signaling through antibodies on the cell surface. “As soon as the experiment worked, I got T cells from the lab next door and did the same experiment. That was my strategy: as soon as something worked, I would apply it elsewhere and didn’t stop just because I was a B-cell biologist and not a T-cell biologist. What I learned then, that I have continued to benefit from, is that a lot of scientists tend to adhere to a niche. They cling to these niches and are not that flexible. You think scientists are, but really most are not.”
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Creation of insulin-releasing cells in a dish offers hope of diabetes therapy

Creation of insulin-releasing cells in a dish offers hope of diabetes therapy | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A molecular switch could hold the key to a personalized cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are characterized by an inability to produce (or process) insulin, which is required to regulate blood sugar levels. This has been linked to malfunctioning or failing beta cells in the pancreas, but so far scientists have struggled to produce effective replacement cells in the lab. Now a team at Salk Institute believes the problem has been solved.

The Salk scientists found a protein switch – one of several transcription factors in a beta cell – called ERR-gamma that makes the lab-grown cells more responsive to glucose and gets them releasing insulin at a normal rate. This ERR-gamma switch appears to be the master regulator for maturing glucose-responsive beta cells.
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Genetic Resilience | The Scientist Magazine®

Genetic Resilience | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Most genomic studies to date have focused on linking mutations to diseases. Taking a new approach, researchers studying the genomes of apparently healthy individuals identified some people who seem to be resilient to severe genetic disorders that are known to crop up during childhood. Of the 589,306 human genomes they analyzed, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City and their colleagues identified 13 people who carry mutations for certain genetic disorders but do not appear to have the associated diseases, according to a study published today (April 11) in Nature Biotechnology.

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“If you wanted to find clues to prevention,” study coauthor Stephen Friend, president of the nonprofit Sage Bionetworks and a geneticist Mount Sinai, said during a press briefing, “instead of looking at people with disease, you would want to look at individuals who should have gotten sick.”

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Micro-needle insertion into hippocampus stimulates brain regeneration in animal model of AD | KurzweilAI

Sticking a needle into the hippocampus of mice modeled with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) improved performance on memory tasks, stimulated regenerative activity, and reduced β-amyloid plaques (a hallmark of AD). This area was chosen because the early and primary damage by AD appears to take place in the hippocampus.

Until recently, many diseases of the central nervous system could not be treated by this method because of inaccessibility of the brain to micro-needles, said the researchers.
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Cancerous Conduits | The Scientist Magazine®

Cancerous Conduits | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Metastatic cancer cells use nanotubes to manipulate blood vessels.
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Final piece of the diabetes puzzle opens the door to better screening

Final piece of the diabetes puzzle opens the door to better screening | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Our understanding of diabetes has taken some significant strides recently, but a new discovery has the potential to significantly improve the screening process by giving us a more complete picture of the disease. Working out the University of Lincoln in the UK, a team was able to identify the fifth and final molecule attacked by the immune system in Type 1 of the condition.
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The Two Faces of Fish Oil | The Scientist Magazine®

The Two Faces of Fish Oil | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The researchers found that human mesenchymal stem cells (multipotent stromal cells already implicated in drug resistance) injected into tumor-bearing mice began secreting these fatty acids when the animals were administered cisplatin—a platinum-based drug used to treat various types of cancer. These platinum-induced fatty acids (PIFAs) had no effect on tumor growth, but neutralized the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on tumor cells, hinting at a possible mechanism of chemoresistance in human patients receiving platinum-based therapies.
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Machine learning rivals human skills in cancer detection | KurzweilAI

Machine learning rivals human skills in cancer detection | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Samsung Medison, a global medical equipment company and an affiliate of Samsung Electronics, has just updated its RS80A ultrasound imaging system with a deep learning algorithm for breast-lesion analysis.

The “S-Detect for Breast” feature uses big data collected from breast-exam cases and recommends whether the selected lesion is benign or malignant. It’s used in in lesion segmentation, characteristic analysis, and assessment processes, providing “more accurate results.”

“We saw a high level of conformity from analyzing and detecting lesion in various cases by using the S-Detect,” said professor Han Boo Kyung, a radiologist at Samsung Medical Center.
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Arginine Reduces Insulin Resistance in People with Visceral Obesity

...a well-designed arginine formulation can help trigger your own internal biochemical resources of mental and physical power for feeling more vital and youthful. It can do this by increasing GH release for stronger muscles, boosting sexual function, enhancing memory, and strengthening immune function, not to mention improving cardiovascular function.

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Turmeric Improves Working Memory | Life Enhancement Products

Turmeric Improves Working Memory | Life Enhancement Products | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Because of the increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia in diabetes, it is important to identify the phenomenon as early as possible and reverse or slow it down. Diabetes and dementia may serve as a risk factor for the other thus initiating a vicious cycle. This makes early detection and intervention imperative.

>The Rational Behind Turmeric

The evidence to date is not clear that current pharmacotherapy alters the risk of dementia in diabetes, with the possible exception of metformin. Vitamin B12 supplementation along with metformin may help sustain metformin’s potential value thus denying the exception. Also on the supplement stage, there are indications epidemiologically and experimentally that turmeric may reduce the risk of dementia and that its aromatic turmerone content may induce neural stem cell proliferation...

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Advances in Genome Editing | The Scientist Magazine®

Advances in Genome Editing | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Most genetic diseases in humans are caused by point mutations—single base errors in the DNA sequence. However, current genome-editing methods cannot efficiently correct these mutations in cells, and often cause random nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels) as a byproduct. Now, researchers at Harvard University have modified CRISPR/Cas9 technology to get around these problems, creating a new “base editor,” described today (April 20) in Nature, which permanently and efficiently converts cytosine (C) to uracil (U) bases with low error in human and mouse cell lines.

“There are a lot of genetic diseases where you would want, in essence, to swap bases in and out,” said Jacob Corn, scientific director of the Innovative Genomics Initiative at the University of California,

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Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature | The Scientist Magazine®

Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Clusters of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may play a larger role in cancer metastasis than previously thought. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have now shown that these clusters can squeeze through microfluidic channels just 7 microns (μm) in diameter. The team’s findings were published today (April 18) in PNAS.

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Most cancer deaths are caused by tumors metastasizing to different organs. Traditionally, clusters of these cells were thought to be too large to pass through capillaries, instead getting stuck and forming blood clots. Yet, more recently, these clusters have been detected in blood drawn from cancer patients. “If they’re so big, how can we find them in blood collection in the arm?” study coauthor Mehmet Toner of Massachusetts General Hospital told The Scientist.

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Ultrathin organic material enhances e-skin displays | KurzweilAI

Ultrathin organic material enhances e-skin displays | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
University of Tokyo researchers have developed technology to enable creation of electronic skin (e-skin) displays of blood oxygen level, e-skin heart rate sensors for medical, athletic uses, and other applications.

To serve as a demo, they’ve created an ultrathin, ultraflexible, protective layer and created an air-stable, organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display.
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Microscope uses nanosecond-speed laser and deep learning to detect cancer cells more efficiently | KurzweilAI

Microscope uses nanosecond-speed laser and deep learning to detect cancer cells more efficiently | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists at the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA have developed a new technique for identifying cancer cells in blood samples faster and more accurately than the current standard methods.

In one common approach to testing for cancer, doctors add biochemicals to blood samples. Those biochemicals attach biological “labels” to the cancer cells, and those labels enable instruments to detect and identify them. However, the biochemicals can damage the cells and render the samples unusable for future analyses. There are other current techniques that don’t use labeling but can be inaccurate because they identify cancer cells based only on one physical characteristic.
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Branching Out | The Scientist Magazine®

Branching Out | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have created a new tree of life showing the relationships among all known living things, which taxonomists typically classify into one of three domains: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. One of this new tree’s largest branches consists of bacteria that are essentially new to science, according to a study published today (April 11) in Nature Microbiology.
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