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Genomics at your fingertips: DNA Sequencing in the Primary Care Office - The Doctor Weighs In

Genomics at your fingertips: DNA Sequencing in the Primary Care Office - The Doctor Weighs In | Longevity science | Scoop.it
RT @EricTopol: Genomics at Your Fingertips http://t.co/iehVcVfP by @drkevincampbell HT @cyphergenomics #CDoM

Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, February 9, 2013 2:17 AM

Interesting article on the possible future development of sequencing in the primary care office.  The article builds off a new technology reported by Anne Eisenberg in a recent NY Times article. This technology from a company called Knome, allows a single Lab or office to sequence a person's genome.  The technology costs about $125,000.

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3D-printed attachment turns any smartphone into a DNA-scanning microscope

3D-printed attachment turns any smartphone into a DNA-scanning microscope | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have built a cheap 3D-printed attachment able to turn smartphones into sophisticated microscopes. Armed with the new device, a smartphone would be able to detect single DNA strands and analyze them to diagnose diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s without bulky and expensive equipment.

Cheap and portable medical diagnostics could make a real difference in assisting patients in third-world countries or remote areas, and microscopes are an important part of the arsenal. In the past, we've seen several attachments that can turn phones into microscopes for a measly price.
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Functioning synthetic blood vessels become the real thing

Functioning synthetic blood vessels become the real thing | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When a vein or artery gets seriously blocked, a common course of action involves replacing it with part of another blood vessel harvested from elsewhere in the patient's body. While 3D-printed and lab-grown blood vessels show promise as alternatives, scientists from the Vienna University of Technology and Vienna Medical University have developed another option – polymer fabric vessels that transform into biological ones, once implanted.

The artificial blood vessels are made from biocompatible and biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethanes.
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Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA to store information | KurzweilAI

Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA to store information | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Johns Hopkins and UCLA scientists have discovered that neurons use minor “DNA surgeries” to control their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory and brain disorders, the researchers think their finding will shed light on a range of important questions.

“We used to think that once a cell reaches full maturation, its DNA is totally stable, including the molecular tags attached to it to control its genes and maintain the cell’s identity,” says Hongjun Song, Ph.D., a professor of neurology and neuroscience in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Institute for Cell Engineering. “This research shows that some cells actually alter their DNA all the time, just to perform everyday functions.”
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Personalized Devices Predict Cancer Drug Response | The Scientist Magazine®

Personalized Devices Predict Cancer Drug Response | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Despite advances in analyzing tumor biology, choosing effective therapies for cancer patients remains difficult. This is partly because there are still no timely, foolproof ways to test whether a patient will respond to a particular treatment. Addressing this issue, two independent teams—one at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and another at MIT—have developed devices that can test a tumor’s response to multiple cancer drugs directly in the patient. Both devices are described today (April 22) in Science Translational Medicine.

If validated in human clinical studies, the devices—which are being further developed by spinoff companies—could be used before surgery to help identify the best course of individualized treatment for certain cancer patients.
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Why you should try body-weight exercises

Why you should try body-weight exercises | Longevity science | Scoop.it
“Body-weight exercises are exercises performed without external resistance and loading of the body,” says Mike Fantigrassi, master instructor at the National Academy of Sports Medicine. “No resistance bands or weights.”

Some exercises involve minimal equipment such as TRX suspension bands for pull-ups and Bosu balls for balance. But for the most part, says Fantigrassi, “you can do them anywhere.”

Another plus, he says, is that they “tend to teach an integrated approach to exercise.”
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The Achilles’ Heel of Senescent Cells: From Transcriptome to Senolytic Drugs - Zhu - Aging Cell - Wiley Online Library

...The combination of dasatinib and quercetin was effective in eliminating senescent MEFs. In vivo, this combination reduced senescent cell burden in chronologically aged, radiation-exposed, and progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice.


In old mice, cardiac function and carotid vascular reactivity were improved 5 days after a single dose. Following irradiation of one limb in mice, a single dose led to improved exercise capacity for at least 7 months following drug treatment. Periodic drug administration extended healthspan in Ercc1-/∆ mice, delaying age-related symptoms and pathology...

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Steering the epigenome to turn specific genes on | KurzweilAI

Steering the epigenome to turn specific genes on | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
(credit: Human Epigenome Project) Duke University researchers have developed a new method to precisely control when genes are turned on and active: by
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Are populations aging more slowly than we think? | KurzweilAI

Are populations aging more slowly than we think? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increases in life expectancy do not necessarily produce faster overall population aging, according to new open-access research published in the journal PLOS ONE.

This counterintuitive finding was the result of applying new measures of aging, developed at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) to future population projections for Europe up to the year 2050.
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Master protein found to enhance both muscles and the brain | KurzweilAI

Master protein found to enhance both muscles and the brain | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Salk Institute for Biological Studies scientists and collaborators have discovered that physical and mental activities rely on a single metabolic protein called estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) that controls the flow of blood and nutrients throughout the body.

The new study could point to potential treatments in regenerative and developmental medicine as well as ways to address defects in learning and memory.

“This is all about getting energy where it’s needed to ‘the power plants’ in the body,” says Ronald Evans, director of Salk’s Gene Expression Laboratory and senior author of the new paper, published April 7 in the journal Cell Metabolism.
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3D neural reconstruction guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels | KurzweilAI

3D neural reconstruction guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Damage to neural tissue is typically permanent and causes lasting disability in patients. But a method for reconstructing neural tissue using patterned nanofibers in 3D hydrogel structures promises to one day help in the restoration of functional neuroanatomical pathways and structures at sites of spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, tumor resection, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Richard J. McMurtrey, director of the Institute of Neural Regeneration & Tissue Engineering and affiliated with the University of Oxford, found that neurite outgrowth from neurons in the hydrogel followed the nanofiber scaffolding, particularly when the nanofibers were coated with a type of cell adhesion molecule called laminin. The coated nanofibers also enhanced the length of growing neurites.
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‘Google Maps’ for the body | KurzweilAI

‘Google Maps’ for the body | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Biomedical engineer Melissa Knothe Tate at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia is using previously proprietary semiconductor technology to zoom through organs of the human body, down to the level of a single cell.

The imaging technology, developed by high-tech German optical and industrial measurement manufacturer Zeiss, was originally developed to scan silicon wafers for defects.

UNSW Professor Melissa Knothe Tate, the Paul Trainor Chair of Biomedical Engineering, is leading the project, which is using semiconductor technology to explore osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

Using Google algorithms, Tate — an engineer and expert in cell biology and regenerative medicine – is able to zoom in and out from the scale of the whole joint down to the cellular level “just as you would with Google Maps,” reducing to “a matter of weeks analyses that once took 25 years to complete”.
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Biohackers develop night vision eye drops to see in the dark

Biohackers develop night vision eye drops to see in the dark | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It sounds like something from a science-fiction movie, but a biohacking group in California has managed to develop eye drops that temporarily give a human being excellent night vision. The chemicals used are still very much at the experimental stage – this isn't something you'd want to try at home just yet – but the first trial has been a successful one.

The main ingredient in the eye drop solution is Chlorin e6. It's found in certain deep sea fish, enabling them to find their way around underwater, and it's also been used to treat humans with poor night vision. Essentially, it creates a microscopic chemical reaction that amplifies low light sources as they pass through.
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Employer incentives for U.S. worker wellness programs set record

Employer incentives for U.S. worker wellness programs set record | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Employers have ratcheted up the financial incentives they offer workers to participate in wellness programs to a record $693 per employee, on average, this year from $594 in 2014 and $430 five years ago, found a report released on Thursday.

And fewer employers are imposing penalties such as charging more for insurance if workers do not participate or achieve goals such as losing weight.
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Scientists discover key driver of human aging | KurzweilAI

Scientists discover key driver of human aging | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A study tying the aging process to the deterioration of tightly packaged bundles of cellular DNA could lead to methods of preventing and treating age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, scientists at the Salk Institute and the Chinese Academy of Science note in a paper published Thursday, April 30 in the journal Science.

They found that the genetic mutations underlying Werner syndrome, a disorder that leads to premature aging and death, resulted in the deterioration of bundles of DNA ...

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What people who live longest eat

In the early years of this century, demographers studying populations with unusually long life spans mapped out places where longevity correlated with certain lifestyles, marking those areas in blue.

Dan Buettner, a National Geographic fellow, has been studying these “blue zones” for more than a decade, talking to centenarians, studying their genetics, examining their diets and habits, and writing several books.
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Rachel Sellés's curator insight, May 2, 9:05 AM

Living longer

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Existing skin medications may reverse effects of multiple sclerosis

Existing skin medications may reverse effects of multiple sclerosis | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It's a frustrating situation. There are already stem cells in the nervous system that are capable of repairing the damage done by multiple sclerosis, but getting them to do so has proven very difficult. Now, however, a multi-institutional team led by Case Western Reserve University's Prof. Paul Tesar may have found the answer – and it involves using medications that were designed to treat athlete's foot and eczema.

Multiple sclerosis causes the immune system to attack myelin, which is the protective coating that surrounds nerve fibers in the spinal cord, brain and optic nerve. With that insulating layer gone or compromised, electrical signals can't travel down the nerves properly. As a result, MS sufferers can lose partial to complete control of their legs or arms, or the use of their eyes – along with experiencing other problems.
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New sampling device promises to make blood tests needle-free

New sampling device promises to make blood tests needle-free | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Though the pain they cause is minor and fleeting, a lot of people still find something pretty unsettling about needles. When it comes to conducting a routine blood test, US-based company Tasso Inc. believes that these unpleasant pricks can be removed from the equation completely. Its ping pong ball-sized HemoLink blood sampler can be operated by the patient at home, and needs only to be placed against the skin of the arm or abdomen for two minutes to do its job.
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Consuming eggs might help cut your risk of developing diabetes

Consuming eggs might help cut your risk of developing diabetes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A study finds that although diabetics often have high cholesterol, eating eggs may be beneficial.
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Protein converts pancreatic cancer cells back into healthy cells

Protein converts pancreatic cancer cells back into healthy cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists working in the area of pancreatic cancer research have uncovered a technique that sees cancerous cells transform back into normal healthy cells. The method relies in the introduction of a protein called E47, which bonds with particular DNA sequences and reverts the cells back to their original state.

The study was a collaboration between researchers at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, University of California San Diego and Purdue University. The scientists are hopeful that it could help combat the deadly disease in humans.
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How to get the entire immune system to attack cancer | KurzweilAI

How to get the entire immune system to attack cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The human immune system is poised to spring into action at the first sign of a foreign invader, but it often fails to eliminate tumors that arise from the body’s own cells.
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Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging

Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Our tissue's inability to repair itself as we grow older is thought to correlate with the decline in the presence of stem cells. So it follows that if stem cell function can be preserved beyond the norm, it could have implications for the aging process and adverse effects of tissue degeneration, such as cancer.


Scientists from the University of Toronto have followed this line of thinking through research on the mammary glands of genetically modified mice, finding that development of the tissue can be manipulated to avoid the effects of aging.

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Geomagnetic compass hooked to the brain allows blind rats to ‘see’ | KurzweilAI

Geomagnetic compass hooked to the brain allows blind rats to ‘see’ | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
By attaching a microstimulator and geomagnetic compass to the brains of blind rats, researchers found that the animals can spontaneously learn to use new information about their location to navigate through a maze, and nearly as well as normally sighted rats.

The researchers say the findings suggest that a similar kind of neuroprosthesis might also help blind people walk freely through the world.

Most notably, perhaps, the findings, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Thursday April 2, show the incredible flexibility and latent ability of the mammalian brain, says Yuji Ikegaya of the University of Tokyo.
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Non-invasive brain-machine interface gets a grip on bionic hand control

Non-invasive brain-machine interface gets a grip on bionic hand control | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from the University of Houston (UH) has developed an algorithm that enabled a man whose right hand had been amputated to grasp objects using a bionic hand controlled by his thoughts. While we've seen similar accomplishments in recent years, the new technique is non-invasive, capturing brain activity via a scalp EEG.

Research developments in recent years have given amputees much cause for hope with various thought-controlled prosthetic devices. Some have relied on surgically implanted electrodes, while others make use of electrical signals from muscles (known as myoelectric control).
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MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies

MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
While non-invasive imaging technologies such as mammograms or CT scans are capable of detecting tumors, identifying whether they are malignant or benign usually involves getting out the scalpel and conducting a biopsy. Now researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a technique that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to noninvasively detect cancerous cells, offering the potential of supplementing biopsies or maybe one day replacing them altogether.

The team's study, conducted on test tube-grown cells and mice, took advantage of recent findings by other research groups indicating that glucose can be detected without the use of injectable dyes by a fine-tuned MRI technique. Because the outer membranes of certain cancerous cells shed sugar molecules, the Johns Hopkins researchers were able to use this technique to image cancerous cells.
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‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | KurzweilAI

‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed “nanoneedles” that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice.

The researchers, from Imperial College London and Houston Methodist Research Institute in the USA, hope their nanoneedle technique could ultimately help damaged organs and nerves repair themselves and help transplanted organs thrive.

In a trial described in Nature Materials, the team showed they could deliver nucleic acids DNA and siRNA to back muscles in mice. After seven days there was a six-fold increase in the formation of new blood vessels in the mouse back muscles, and blood vessels continued to form over a 14 day period.
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