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Blocking this molecule in the brain could prevent age-related cognitive decline | KurzweilAI

Researchers have discovered a molecule that accumulates with age and inhibits the formation of new neurons. The finding might help scientists design therapies to prevent age-related cognitive decline.

 

 

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CNN’s Spurlock Inside Man explores extreme life extension | KurzweilAI

CNN’s Spurlock Inside Man explores extreme life extension | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
TONIGHT:
(Credit: CNN) In Futurism, an episode in CNN's original series Morgan Spurlock Inside Man on Sunday April 20, Spurlock enters the brave new world of
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CNN’s Spurlock Inside Man explores extreme life extension | KurzweilAI

CNN’s Spurlock Inside Man explores extreme life extension | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In “Futurism,” an episode in CNN’s original series Morgan Spurlock Inside Man on Sunday April 20, Spurlock enters the “brave new world of extreme life extension, embarking on a life-prolonging regimen and trying everything from genome hacking to creating an avatar and uploading his consciousness in preparation for the ‘Technological Singularity.’


“Spurlock’s quest to live forever includes visits with radical futurist Ray Kurzweil, Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Cambrian Genomics in San Francisco, North Carolina’s Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and Denver’s Grossman Wellness Center.”



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Features interviews with Ray & Terry, and a visit to Grossman Wellness Center.

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Scientists give stem cells a performance boost ... by putting them on steroids

Scientists give stem cells a performance boost ... by putting them on steroids | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Stem cells are highly promising for the treatment of everything from HIV to leukemia to baldness. In many cases, however, a great number of them must be used in order have a noticeable effect, which makes treatments impractical or expensive.


Now, scientists at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that a smaller number of stem cells can still get the job done, if they're first hopped up on steroids.



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Too much animal protein tied to higher diabetes risk

People who eat the most protein, especially from animal sources, are more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, according to a study of European adults.

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Spinal stimulation allows paraplegics to move legs

Spinal stimulation allows paraplegics to move legs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Epidural electrical stimulation involves implanting an electrode array along the lower part of the spinal cord, which ordinarily controls movement of the hips, knees, ankles and toes.


Unlike some similar approaches, the electrodes aren't being used to directly stimulate the muscles. Instead, they act to reengage the spinal cord's local nerve network, which doesn't require input from the brain to carry out basic motor functions.


Researchers surmised that this stimulation, combined with sensory input such as stepping on a treadmill could lead to movement.



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World-first regeneration of a living organ

World-first regeneration of a living organ | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For the first time, the team has successfully regenerated a living organ in mice by manipulating DNA.


The organ in question was the thymus, which is located next to the heart and is an integral part of the immune system. In humans, it achieves most of its growth in early life, continuing to then grow slowly until puberty when it slowly begins to shrink for the remainder of a person's life. It's deterioration with age leaves older people with greater susceptibility to infections, such as flu.



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Get fit now! Early-life cardiovascular problems linked to cognitive deficits later

Get fit now! Early-life cardiovascular problems linked to cognitive deficits later | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers have known for some time that cardiovascular problems in middle and later adulthood may cause cognitive deficits as we age. But surprisingly, there has been little, if any, research into whether high blood pressure, elevated blood glucose and high cholesterol earlier in adulthood have the same effect. A new study by University of California, San Francisco researchers shows that they may, providing another reason to pay attention to fitness and cardiovascular health early in life.



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Scientists regenerate immune organ in mice

British scientists have for the first time used regenerative medicine to fully restore an organ in a living animal, a discovery they say may pave the way for similar techniques to be used in humans in future.


The University of Edinburgh team rebuilt the thymus - an organ central to the immune system and found in front of the heart - of very old mice by reactivating a natural mechanism that gets shut down with age.



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Scientists watch bioengineered self-healing muscle tissue grow within a mouse

Scientists watch bioengineered self-healing muscle tissue grow within a mouse | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The living skeletal muscle tissue grown by Duke University researchers is 10 times stronger than any previously bioengineered muscles. Not only does it contract as strongly and as rapidly as the real thing, but it is also capable of self-healing, both in the lab and after implantation into an animal. This has been proven beyond doubt through a novel approach that involves peeking at the growing muscle tissue through a glass window in the back of a living mouse.



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Gut simulator could bring down the costs of drug development

Gut simulator could bring down the costs of drug development | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Before drugs are tested on humans, they first go through pre-clinical tests on animals. Because humans and animals don't have identical gastrointestinal tracts, however, the way in which the drugs are absorbed by the body often differs between the two. A scientist from the UK's University of Huddersfield hopes to address that discrepancy, with his "gut simulator."



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"Mini hearts" on veins could be used to treat circulatory problems

"Mini hearts" on veins could be used to treat circulatory problems | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When someone has chronic venous insufficiency, it means that because of faulty valves in their leg veins, oxygen-poor blood isn't able to be pumped back to their heart. The George Washington University's Dr. Narine Sarvazyan has created a possible solution, however – a beating "mini heart" that's wrapped around the vein, to help push the blood through.


The mini heart takes the form of a cuff of rhythmically-contracting heart tissue, made by coaxing the patient's own adult stem cells into becoming cardiac cells. When one of those cuffs is placed around a vein, its contractions aid in the unidirectional flow of blood, plus it helps keep the vein from becoming distended. Additionally, because it's grown from the patient's own cells, there's little chance of rejection.



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Netherlands patient gets 3D printed skull in life-saving operation

Netherlands patient gets 3D printed skull in life-saving operation | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A Netherlands patient suffering from a chronic bone disorder got a 3D printed skull after undergoing a life-saving operation. The 22-year-old woman is ailed with a degenerating disorder which has caused her skull to grow thicker, from 1.5 centimeters to 5 centimeters. She also suffered from poor vision and severe headaches. Doctors removed the top part of her skull and replaced it with an implant version made by a 3D printer.



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First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | KurzweilAI

First comprehensive atlas of human gene activity released | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A large international consortium of researchers has produced the first comprehensive, detailed map of the way genes work across the major cells and tissues of the human body. The findings describe the complex networks that govern gene activity, and the new information could play a crucial role in identifying the genes involved with disease.


“Now, for the first time, we are able to pinpoint the regions of the genome that can be active in a disease and in normal activity, whether it’s in a brain cell, the skin, in blood stem cells or in hair follicles,” said Winston Hide, associate professor of bioinformatics and computational biology at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and one of the core authors of the main paper in Nature.



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Rats receive lab-grown esophagi

Rats receive lab-grown esophagi | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Ordinarily, when patients require a total or partial replacement of their esophagus, tissue from their own stomach or intestine is used. This doesn't always result in a fully-functioning organ, plus it also involves the surgical removal of the needed material.


Now, however, scientists have come a step closer to being able to grow a new esophagus from the patient's own stem cells, and in fact have already done so – with rats.


As part of an international collaboration, researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet started by removing all of the cells from rat esophagi. This just left an empty scaffold of the organ, although one that retained the original's mechanical and chemical properties.

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New kind of trial aims to speed cancer drug development

Scientists and drugmakers are pioneering a new kind of clinical trial that changes the way cancer drugs are studied, potentially cutting both the time and cost of bringing them to market.


Instead of testing one drug at a time, a novel lung cancer study announced on Thursday will allow British researchers to test up to 14 drugs from AstraZeneca and Pfizer at the same time within one trial.



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Panasonic's robotic bed/wheelchair first to earn global safety certification

Panasonic's robotic bed/wheelchair first to earn global safety certification | Longevity science | Scoop.it

There's a lot of talk about Japan's rapidly aging society, and how it is expected to literally place a heavy burden on the island nation's caregivers. Among the many projected problems is a smaller pool of health care workers amidst a growing tide of elderly who require around-the-clock care. With that kind of workload, nurses are more likely to injure themselves or their patients when lifting them into and out of bed.


Various solutions are in the works, such as a giant lifting robot that looks like a teddy bear, but few are as practical as Panasonic's Resyone robotic bed. It recently became the first to be certified ISO13482 compliant, the new global safety standard for service robots.



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Lab-grown cartilage used to perform nose reconstruction surgery

Lab-grown cartilage used to perform nose reconstruction surgery | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers from Switzerland's University of Basel have performed the first successful nose reconstruction surgery using engineered cartilage grown in the laboratory. The cartilage was spawned form the patient's own cells in an approach that could circumvent the need for more invasive surgeries.


The team applied the treatment to a group of five patients aged 76-88. The patients had previously received surgery to remove non-melanoma skin cancers, leaving them with severe defects in the cartilage of their noses.



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da Vinci Xi Surgical System is ready to flex its arms

da Vinci Xi Surgical System is ready to flex its arms | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While many people no doubt still look at Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci robotic surgical system as a sort of "wonder of the future," it's actually been around now for over 10 years. Therefore, it shouldn't come as a surprise that a new-and-improved model has just been announced. Among other things, the da Vinci Xi Surgical System promises a greater range of motion and more reach than its predecessor.


Like the regular da Vinci, the Xi is designed for performing minimally-invasive surgery. It does so using robotic arms equipped with long skinny surgical instruments, along with an endoscopic camera, that enter the patient's abdomen or chest via relatively small incisions.



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Stretchy, health monitoring skin patch uses off-the-shelf components

Stretchy, health monitoring skin patch uses off-the-shelf components | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University is developing a stick-on patch that makes health monitoring more flexible and practical. Building on previous work, the latest design replaces custom-made components with off-the-shelf, chip-based electronics to deliver a soft, tattoo-like epidermal electronic system for wireless health monitoring.



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Russ Roberts's curator insight, April 10, 8:01 PM

A nice application of surface mount and chip technology for wireless health monitoring.  Since the stick-on medical patch uses "off-the-shelf", chip-based electronics, the cost of this applied technology should be fairly cheap.  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Forcing cancer cells to devour themselves by blocking a protein signal | KurzweilAI

Forcing cancer cells to devour themselves by blocking a protein signal | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Under stress from chemotherapy or radiation, some cancer cells dodge death by autophagy — eating a bit of themselves — allowing them to essentially sleep through treatment and later awaken as tougher, resistant disease.


But interfering with a single cancer-promoting protein and its receptor can turn this resistance mechanism into lethal, runaway self-cannibalization, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cell Reports (open access).



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Fruits and Vegetables Do More to Reduce Cancer and Extend Life Than Many Prescription Drugs

Fruits and Vegetables Do More to Reduce Cancer and Extend Life Than Many Prescription Drugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Those who eat seven or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day cut their risk of death at any age by 42 percent compared to those who don’t get a full serving of the foods.



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Magnetically controlled nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct | KurzweilAI

Magnetically controlled nanoparticles cause cancer cells to self-destruct | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a technique to use magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to “self-destruct.” without harming surrounding tissue, as with radiotherapy, and tissues elsewhere in the body, as with chemotherapy.


“Our technique is able to attack only the tumor cells,” said Enming Zhang, first author of the study.


Inducing cell suicide

The technique involves getting the nanoparticles into a tumor cell, where they bind to lysosomes...



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IBM's Watson supercomputer takes aim at brain cancer

IBM's Watson supercomputer takes aim at brain cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

IBM's Watson supercomputer is being re-tasked to help clinicians create personalized treatments for a common form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma. The project, which is a collaboration between IBM and the New York Genome Center (NYGC), hopes to make use of Watson's artificial intelligence to analyze vast quantities of data in order to suggest a personalized life-saving treatment based on the patient's individual case.



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MIT’s fast synthesis system could boost peptide-drug development | KurzweilAI

MIT’s fast synthesis system could boost peptide-drug development | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Small protein fragments, also called peptides, are promising as drugs because they can be designed for very specific functions inside living cells, but manufacturing the peptides takes several weeks, making it difficult to obtain large quantities, and to rapidly test their effectiveness.


A team of MIT chemists and chemical engineers has designed a way to manufacture peptides in mere hours. The new system, described in a recent issue of the journal ChemBioChem, could have a major impact on peptide drug development, says Bradley Pentelute, an assistant professor of chemistry and leader of the research team.



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U.S. advisers back DNA-based colon cancer test

A colon cancer screening method that analyzes DNA from stool samples won the unanimous backing of a U.S. advisory panel on Thursday, paving the way for potential regulatory approval of the non-invasive test.


A panel of outside experts advising the Food and Drug Administration voted 10-0 to recommend approval of the Cologuard screening test made by Exact Sciences Corp.



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