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Probiotic plus aloe shows cholesterol-lowering potential: Animal data

Probiotic plus aloe shows cholesterol-lowering potential: Animal data | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Combining probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplements with aloe vera may slash cholesterol levels by over 40%, suggests a new study with lab rats.
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DARPA working on portable and ruggedized artificial "biospleen" to fight sepsis

DARPA working on portable and ruggedized artificial "biospleen" to fight sepsis | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The reason why infection is so dangerous in both the military and civilian spheres is because it can lead to sepsis. That is, the body overreacts to the infection with often fatal results.


DARPA is developing an artificial spleen, or "biospleen," as a way to help fight deadly infections without antibiotics.



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How to quickly convert human skin cells into immune-fighting white blood cells | KurzweilAI

How to quickly convert human skin cells into immune-fighting white blood cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Salk Institute scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders.


The process, described in the journal Stem Cells, is “quick and safe in mice,” says senior author Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, holder of Salk’s Roger Guillemin Chair.



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An in-depth look at Team Aezon's Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE entry

An in-depth look at Team Aezon's Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE entry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE aims to stimulate advances in the field of diagnostic equipment, with the incentive of a US$10 million prize purse. Such technology has the potential to revolutionize the speed and accuracy with which a diagnosis can be made outside of a hospital environment.
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Scientists 'reset' stem cells to study start of human development

Scientists 'reset' stem cells to study start of human development | Longevity science | Scoop.it

British and Japanese scientists have managed to "reset" human stem cells to their earliest state, opening up a new realm of research into the start of human development and potentially life-saving regenerative medicines.



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New synthetic gene circuits can perform complex bio-logic tasks | KurzweilAI

New synthetic gene circuits can perform complex bio-logic tasks | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Kansas Medical Center are making genetic circuits that can perform complex tasks by swapping protein building blocks.


The modular genetic circuits,  which are engineered from parts of otherwise unrelated bacterial genomes, can be set up to handle multiple chemical inputs simultaneously with a minimum of interference from their neighbors.


The work, reported in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Synthetic Biology, gives scientists more options as they design synthetic cells for specific tasks, such as production of biofuels, environmental remediation, or treatments for human diseases.



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How to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases | KurzweilAI

How to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Bristol researchers have discovered how to stop cells from attacking healthy body tissue in debilitating autoimmune diseases (such as multiple sclerosis), where the body’s immune system destroys its own tissue by mistake.


The cells were converted from being aggressive to actually protecting against disease.



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Honey, we could have a new weapon in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Honey, we could have a new weapon in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A study at at Sweden's Lund University have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in the honey stomach of bees and passed onto fresh ho...
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Eric Larson's curator insight, September 10, 6:33 AM

Honey is more important than you may think,

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Obesity rates reach historic highs in more U.S. states

Obesity rates reach historic highs in more U.S. states | Longevity science | Scoop.it
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A multifunctional medical nanoparticle | KurzweilAI

A multifunctional medical nanoparticle | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions have created biocompatible multitasking nanoparticles that could be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors. The study was published online in Nature Communications.


“These are amazingly useful particles,” noted co-first author Yuanpei Li, a research faculty member in the Lam laboratory. “As a contrast agent, they make tumors easier to see on MRI and other scans. We can also use them as vehicles to deliver chemotherapy directly to tumors, apply light to make the nanoparticles release singlet oxygen (photodynamic therapy), or use a laser to heat them (photothermal therapy) — all proven ways to destroy tumors.”



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New algorithm identifies weak spots in body tissue prior to injury

New algorithm identifies weak spots in body tissue prior to injury | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Muscle and tendon strains or tears may soon be detectable prior to injury, thanks to new algorithms developed by researchers at Washington University in St ...
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When it comes to muscle, tendon, and bone injuries, early diagnosis can save you from a world of hurt and lengthy rehabilitation. Researchers at Washington University in St Louis have developed algorithms that may one day – after some refinement in imaging techniques – identify tiny strains before they turn into serious injuries.


The researchers combined mechanical engineering with image-analysis techniques to create the algorithms, one of which they measured as being 1,000 times more accurate than older methods at quantifying very large stretches near tiny cracks and tears. Another algorithm predicts where cracks are likely to form.

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Gut bacteria discovery could lead to probiotic therapy for food allergies

Gut bacteria discovery could lead to probiotic therapy for food allergies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The latest cause for hope, which could one day let food allergy sufferers order in restaurants without worrying about potentially life-threatening ingredien...
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Eric Larson's curator insight, September 1, 3:51 PM

Some stomach problems may get solved.

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UA Discovery Shows Curcumin Blocks the Metastasis of Colon Cancer by a Novel Mechanism | AHSC Office of Public Affairs

UA Discovery Shows Curcumin Blocks the Metastasis of Colon Cancer by a Novel Mechanism | AHSC Office of Public Affairs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of researchers led by the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center discovered that curcumin—the bioactive molecule derived from the spice turmeric—blocks the protein cortactin in colon cancer.


Cortactin, a protein essential for cell movement, frequently is overexpressed in cancer, thus facilitating cancer cell metastasis to other organs in the body.

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Eye pressure-monitoring implant could save glaucoma patients from blindness

Eye pressure-monitoring implant could save glaucoma patients from blindness | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Currently, people with glaucoma must have their internal optic pressure (the pressure within their eye) regularly checked by a specialist. A new implant, ho...
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Interactive Bionic Man, featuring 14 novel biotechnologies | KurzweilAI

Interactive Bionic Man, featuring 14 novel biotechnologies | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has launched the “NIBIB Bionic Man,” an interactive Web tool that showcases cutting-edge research in biotechnology.


The bionic man features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers.



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The $1 Million Race For The Cure To End Aging | TechCrunch

The $1 Million Race For The Cure To End Aging | TechCrunch | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The hypothesis is so absurd it seems as though it popped right off the pages of a science-fiction novel. Some scientists in Palo Alto are offering a $1..
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Exclusive: Two Apple medical trials shed light on how HealthKit will work

Exclusive: Two Apple medical trials shed light on how HealthKit will work | Longevity science | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Two prominent U.S. hospitals are preparing to launch trials with diabetics and chronic disease patients using Apple Inc's (AAPL.O) HealthKit, offering a glimpse of how the iPhone maker's ambitious take on healthcare will work in practice.HealthKit, which is still under development, is the center of a new healthcare system by Apple. Regulated medical devices, such as glucose monitors with accompanying iPhone apps, can send information to HealthKit. With a patient's consent, Apple's service gathers data from various health apps so that it can be viewed by doctors in one place.
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Longevity Gene in Fruit Flies Hints at Coming Genetic Discoveries to Slow Aging

Longevity Gene in Fruit Flies Hints at Coming Genetic Discoveries to Slow Aging | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In a recent study, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), say that activating a gene, AMPK, in fruit flies’ intestines was found to add 30% to their average lifespans—up to eight weeks from the typical six weeks.


Beyond simply boosting lifespans, the flies stayed healthier too.



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Milestone reached in building replacement kidneys in the lab | KurzweilAI

Milestone reached in building replacement kidneys in the lab | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Regenerative medicine researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina have developed what they say is the most successful method to date to keep blood vessels in new human-sized pig kidney organs open and flowing with blood — a major challenge in the quest to build replacement kidneys in the lab.



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Activating gene in key organ systems slows aging process throughout the body

Activating gene in key organ systems slows aging process throughout the body | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of biologists at UCLA have significantly slowed the aging process in fruit flies by activating a gene called AMPK. Possibly of more interest to us hi...
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Scientists regenerate rat muscle tissue, with an eye toward human applications

Scientists regenerate rat muscle tissue, with an eye toward human applications | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Stem cells in rats and mice have been mobilized to form new muscle tissue in situ (i.e., in the body), possibly paving the way for similar treatment in pe...
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Tea trumps coffee for non-cardivascular mortality | KurzweilAI

Tea trumps coffee for non-cardivascular mortality | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Drinking tea is associated with 24% reduced non-cardiovascular mortality, reveals a study of 131,000 people presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress by Professor Nicolas Danchin from France.


The study included 131,401 people aged 18 to 95 years who had a health check up at the Paris IPC Preventive Medicine Center between January 2001 and December 2008. During a mean 3–5 years follow-up, there were 95 deaths from CV and 632 deaths from non-CV causes.



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Battery-less device powers a pacemaker using heartbeats

Battery-less device powers a pacemaker using heartbeats | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Although cardiac pacemakers have saved countless lives, they do have at least one shortcoming – like other electronic devices, their batteries wear out. Swi...
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Cartilage grown from patients' noses used to repair their knees

Cartilage grown from patients' noses used to repair their knees | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Depending on the part of the body and the nature of the injury, cartilage either doesn’t grow back at all, or does so very slowly. Now, however, researchers...
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U.S. startups get OK for smartphone-based heart tracking

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - For a growing U.S. aging population, tracking heart health via a smartphone can mean the difference between life and death.


This week, two Silicon Valley startups received a green-light from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for mobile applications that monitor patients from home


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Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules | KurzweilAI

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The research group of Arun K. Sharma*, PhD has developed a system for patients with urinary bladder dysfunction that may protect them against an inflammatory reaction** resulting from tissue regeneration, which can negatively impact tissue growth, development and function.


The researchers treated a highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs). (Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles, or PAs, are biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials used in a wide range of settings and applications.) When compared with control PAs, the treated scaffold reduced the innate inflammatory response, resulting in superior bladder function.



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AdnanD's curator insight, August 29, 9:32 AM

A very very interesting read