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How to convert connective tissue directly into neurons | KurzweilAI

How to convert connective tissue directly into neurons | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Repression of a single protein in ordinary fibroblasts (connective tissue) is sufficient to directly convert them into functional neurons, scientists in the U.S. and China have discovered.

 

The findings could have far-reaching implications for the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

 

 

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CHOLESTEROL LEVELS and CURCUMIN

CHOLESTEROL LEVELS and CURCUMIN | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Curcumin helps prevent the oxidation of cholesterol in the body. Since oxidized cholesterol damages blood vessels and builds up in the plaques that can lead to heart attack or stroke, preventing the oxidation of new cholesterol may help reduce the progression of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease.


Lowering cholesterol with curcumin
In 2007, D. Peschel showed that curcumin prevents LDL (bad) cholesterol from becoming oxidized, thus preventing the damaging effects of cholesterol on the arteries. Curcumin was shown to lower the LDL (bad) cholesterol levels by stimulating the creation of more LDL-receptors in the liver. http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0955286306000775


Another preliminary research that was performed in India (Soni, K. B. et al, The Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 1992), showed a significant drop in cholesterol levels in ten healthy volunteers who consumed curcumin for seven days. Not only did their blood levels of oxidized cholesterol drop by 33%, but their total cholesterol dropped 11.63%, and their HDL (good cholesterol) increased by 29 percent. http://grande.nal.usda.gov/ibids/index.php?mode2=detail&origin=ibids_references&therow=180525

 

 

A 2009 study by Asma Ejaz indicated that dietary curcumin may have a potential benefit in preventing obesity due to its dual effects on cholesterol and fat tissue. Adipose tissue (aka fat) was suppressed by curcumin. In addition, “curcumin significantly lowered serum cholesterol and … key transcription factors in adipogenesis and lipogenesis. The curcumin suppression of angiogenesis in adipose tissue together with its effect on lipid metabolism in adipocytes may contribute to lower body fat and body weight gain.”
http://jn.nutrition.org/content/139/5/919.abstract

This study, published in 2014, reaffirmed the lipid-lowering effects of curcumin. They found decreased LDL and triglyceride levels as well as an improved ratio in patients with curcumin intake.   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25131839

 

Research continues to examine the effects of curcumin on cholesterol levels. There is sufficient study to indicate that turmeric and curcumin offer a natural option to help maintain healthy cholesterol levels.

 

 


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How Fats Influence the Microbiome | The Scientist Magazine®

How Fats Influence the Microbiome | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The types of lipids mice consume affect the composition of their gut microbiota, which influences whether the animals develop obesity-related inflammation, according to a study published today (August 27) in Cell Metabolism. Mice fed a high-lard diet for 11 weeks developed signs of metabolic disease, while mice fed fish oil remained healthy. When the researchers transplanted gut microbes from fish oil-fed mice to antibiotic-treated mice and then subsequently fed the animals lard, the mice were protected from the typical unhealthy effects of the saturated fat.
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Omega-3 could help support ‘friendly bacteria’ in the gut

Omega-3 could help support ‘friendly bacteria’ in the gut | Longevity science | Scoop.it


The omega-3 fatty acid EPA may help to support the growth and tolerance of probiotic bacterial strains in the human gut, according to new preliminary research.


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Anti-aging effects (in mice) of a dietary supplement called alpha lipoic acid | KurzweilAI

Anti-aging effects (in mice) of a dietary supplement called alpha lipoic acid | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have found that the dietary supplement alpha lipoic acid (ALA) can stimulate telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, with positive effects in a mouse model of atherosclerosis.

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“Alpha lipoic acid has an essential role in mitochondria, the energy-generating elements of the cell,” says senior author Wayne Alexander, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. “It is widely available and has been called a ‘natural antioxidant.’ Yet ALA’s effects in human clinical studies have been a mixed bag.”

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Our ALA supplement is called Anti-Aging Complex. It also contains 3 other powerful nutrients to prevent cellular aging. Learn more here: http://www.rayandterry.com/alaccg.html


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Vitamin K2 Improves Artery Health

Vitamin K2 Improves Artery Health | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Despite it being known as the “blood-clotting” vitamin, research shows vitamin K has anti-aging, anti-cancer, and even bone-building effects.

Within the last couple of years, it has garnered even more attention for its potential role in preventing heart disease.

Impressively, a recent study found that one of its sub-fractions, vitamin MK-7, improved arterial health. The results were published in the journal, Thromobosis and Haemostasis.



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Digital pen technique can diagnose dementia faster and earlier

Digital pen technique can diagnose dementia faster and earlier | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Noting that most current methods of diagnosing cognitive diseases can only detect impairment after the disorders have taken hold, researchers at MIT have combined digital pen technology and some custom software to develop an objective model for early detection.

The new system, still in its concept stage, is a development on the Clock Drawing Test (CDT) that doctors use to screen for illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. In this test patients are asked to draw a clock face showing the time as 10 minutes past 11, and then asked to copy a pre-drawn clock face showing the same time. The results are then examined for signs of problems by a doctor.
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Gene Expression in a Drop | The Scientist Magazine®

Gene Expression in a Drop | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of individual cells can have their transcriptomes analyzed simultaneously thanks to two new techniques.
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How turmeric kills cancer and how to optimize curcumin absorption

How turmeric kills cancer and how to optimize curcumin absorption | Longevity science | Scoop.it
How turmeric kills cancer and how to optimize curcumin absorption
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Study links aerobic fitness, thinner gray matter, and better math skills in kids | KurzweilAI

Study links aerobic fitness, thinner gray matter, and better math skills in kids | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new study reveals that 9- and 10-year-old children who are aerobically fit tend to have significantly thinner gray matter than their “lower-fit” peers. Thinning of the outermost layer of brain cells in the cerebrum is associated with better mathematics performance, researchers report in an open-access paper in the journal PLOS ONE.

The study suggests, but does not prove, that cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to gray matter thinning — a normal process of child brain development. The study also offers the first evidence that fitness enhances math skills by aiding the development of brain structures that contribute to mathematics achievement
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Trans fats, but not saturated fats, linked to risk of death

Trans fats, but not saturated fats, linked to risk of death | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A large new review of existing research suggests that for healthy people, a reasonable amount of saturated fat in the diet poses no health risk.

Trans fats, on the other hand, were associated with an increased risk of death from any cause, death from cardiovascular disease and a diagnosis of coronary heart disease.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:


Ray & Terry recommend that 20-40% of your daily calories come from healthy fats, depending on your individually-appropriate percentages of protein and carbs. A clearer understanding of inflammation and the types of fats have contributed to an evolution in thinking. What really matters is the type of fat you eat.


 


Saturated fats are not all bad. Being more rigid than unsaturated fats, they provide support to your cell membranes and serve as precursors to a variety of hormones and hormone-like substances. A middle-of-the-road approach to saturated fat consumption is to consume about 3 to 7 percent of your daily calories as saturated fat.


 


Trans-fats should be eliminated completely. And unsaturated fats, omega-3s should comprise the majority of fat intake for a healthy diet.



For a detailed discussion on fats in the diet, see Chapter 11: Nutrition (link to: http://www.rayandterry.com/transcend ) of Ray & Terry's book Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever.

Ray & Terry recommend that 20-40% of your daily calories come from healthy fats, depending on your individually-appropriate percentages of protein and carbs. A clearer understanding of inflammation and the types of fats have contributed to an evolution in thinking. What really matters is the type of fat you eat.

 

Saturated fats are not all bad. Being more rigid than unsaturated fats, they provide support to your cell membranes and serve as precursors to a variety of hormones and hormone-like substances. A middle-of-the-road approach to saturated fat consumption is to consume about 3 to 7 percent of your daily calories as saturated fat.

 

Trans-fats should be eliminated completely. And unsaturated fats, omega-3s should comprise the majority of fat intake for a healthy diet.

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New material helps diabetic wounds heal faster

New material helps diabetic wounds heal faster | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Because they often have weakened immune systems and/or blood flow restrictions, diabetics run a heightened risk of serious infection from even the smallest of open wounds. That's why a team of scientists from Egypt's Alexandria University have developed a means of getting those wounds to heal faster – silver-impregnated dressings.

The base of the dressing material is composed of nanofibers made from cellulose acetate – this is an inexpensive and easily-produced semisynthetic polymer used in cigarette filters, among many other things. As those fibers are being electro-spun, silver nanoparticles are added to them. Silver has well-known antibacterial qualities, although excessive amounts of the metal can be toxic.
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Researchers Identify Two Proteins Important in Parkinson’s Disease Progression

Researchers Identify Two Proteins Important in Parkinson’s Disease Progression | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Using a new strategy they have devised to identify the molecular changes that drive the loss of neurons, researchers at The Rockefeller University and colleagues at Columbia University have identified two proteins they report may be important to Parkinson’s. These two gene-regulating molecules appear to have a protective effect in the set of neurons most affected by the disease, and when their activity wanes, disease sets in. This discovery, described online in Nature Neuroscience on July 27, suggests new avenues by which the disease might be prevented or treated.
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Messages in the Noise | The Scientist Magazine®

Messages in the Noise | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The Scientist surveyed researchers who have developed freely accessible tools for the data-swamped epigeneticist. Here’s what they said about what these tools have to offer.
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Robotic needle can be steered through tissue

Robotic needle can be steered through tissue | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A robot-assisted system developed at the University of Twente promises to make medical procedures that use needles more precise. The system allows flexible needles to be steered in real time to their target, which negates issues with tissue and organs deforming from the contact pressure or from any unforeseen obstacles that lie between the needle and its target.

Needles inserted even a few millimeters away from their target can cause problems with both diagnosis and therapy. Placed wrongly, they could render many treatments ineffective or even result in the wrong section of a liver or lung or some other organ getting biopsied in a search for possible tumors.
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Mitochondria Exchange | The Scientist Magazine®

Mitochondria Exchange | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Ten years ago, molecular biologist Darwin Prockop and his team at Texas A&M University observed something unexpected in a coculture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the damaged rat cells they were meant to rescue. The rat cells, the researchers found, consistently contained human mitochondrial DNA.

Although somewhat surprising, it made sense that an infusion of mitochondria could bring a damaged cell back to health.
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How to reprogram cancer cells back to normal | KurzweilAI

How to reprogram cancer cells back to normal | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy has been discovered by researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.

The finding, published in Nature Cell Biology, represents “an unexpected new biology that provides the code, the software for turning off cancer,” says the study’s senior investigator, Panos Anastasiadis, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Cancer Biology on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.
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‘Tricorder’-style handheld MouthLab detects patients’ vital signs, rivaling hospital devices | KurzweilAI

‘Tricorder’-style handheld MouthLab detects patients’ vital signs, rivaling hospital devices | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Inspired by the Star Trek tricorder, engineers and physicians at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed a hand-held, battery-powered device called MouthLab that quickly picks up vital signs from a patient’s lips and fingertip.

Updated versions of the prototype could replace the bulky, restrictive monitors now used to display patients’ vital signs in hospitals and actually gather more data than is typically collected during a medical assessment in an ambulance, emergency room, doctor’s office, or patient’s home.
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Traditional Physical Therapy Gets Upgrade Through Gamified VR Environments - Singularity HUB

Traditional Physical Therapy Gets Upgrade Through Gamified VR Environments - Singularity HUB | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Virtual reality (VR) is the new [old] buzzword [again], capturing the imagination of a new generation of early adopters, technologists and gamers. With its early roots in the 1950s simulation community, there have been decades of research, dedicated journals and conferences that have built a substantial VR knowledge base.


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VR has several opportunities in the healthcare sector. How about physical therapy?

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Surprising results from brain and cognitive studies of a 93-year-old woman athelete | KurzweilAI

Surprising results from brain and cognitive studies of a 93-year-old woman athelete | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Brain scans and cognitive tests of Olga Kotelko, a 93-year-old Canadian track-and-field athlete with more than 30 world records in her age group, may support the potential beneficial effects of exercise on cognition in the “oldest old.”

In the summer of 2012, researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois invited her to visit for in-depth analysis of her brain. The resulting study, was reported in the journal Neurocase.
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Curcumin inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in glioblastoma xenografts. - PubMed - NCBI

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1192-201. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.200900277. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't


curcumin can cross the blood-brain barrier to a high level. These are the first results showing that curcumin suppresses tumor growth of gliomas in xenograft models. The mechanisms of the anti-tumor effects of curcumin were related, at least partly, to the inhibition of glioma-induced angiogenesis.

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New ‘MIND’ diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI

New ‘MIND’ diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Martha Clare Morris, PhD, with brain-healthy fruits (credit: Rush photo group) A new diet known by the acronym MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for
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Low-cost prosthetic arm protects itself (and its user) from burns

Low-cost prosthetic arm protects itself (and its user) from burns | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Amputees in developing nations frequently can't afford the high-end prostheses used by people in other parts of the world. That's why Technological University of Mexico spin-off company Protesta is developing a low-cost artificial arm made from lightweight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic. As an added bonus, the arm will alert the user if it gets too hot.

The present prototype contains a total of 40 heat sensors – 15 in the hand, and 25 along the length of the arm. These are calibrated to 35 ºC (95 ºF), just below normal human body temperature.
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Biocompatible interfaces replace silicon and metal in neural prosthetic devices | KurzweilAI

Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center have developed a biocompatible implantable neural prosthetic device to replace silicon and noble metal in neural prosthetic devices. The goal is to avoid immune-system rejection, failures due to tissue strain, neurodegeneration, and decreased fidelity of recorded neural signals.

Implantable neural prosthetic devices in the brain have been around for almost two decades, helping people living with limb loss and spinal cord injury become more independent, for example. They are also used for deep brain stimulation and brain-controlled prosthetic devices. However, existing neural prosthetic devices suffer from immune-system rejection, and most are believed to eventually fail because of a mismatch between the soft brain tissue and the rigid devices.
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Controlling inflammation to reduce chronic disease risk | KurzweilAI

Controlling inflammation to reduce chronic disease risk | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In an open-access paper in the British Journal of Nutrition, a coalition of 17 experts explain how elevated unresolved chronic inflammation is involved a range of chronic diseases, and how nutrition influences inflammatory processes and helps reduce chronic risk of diseases.

According to the authors, “the nutrition status of the individual with for example a deficiency or excess of certain micronutrients (e.g. folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin 1, vitamin E, zinc) may lead to an ineffective or excessive inflammatory response.
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New blood clot-busting nanocapsule promises immediate care for heart attacks

New blood clot-busting nanocapsule promises immediate care for heart attacks | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When blood clots form in the aftermath of a heart attack or stroke, medications can be deployed to break them apart, but delivery is tricky. Getting the medicine to the clot takes some guesswork and there's no guarantee it will arrive in the right dosage, with complications like hemorrhaging a real possibility. A team of Australian scientists has developed a new approach that sees the drugs carried safely inside a nanocapsule, opening up the treatment to more patients and lessening the chance of side effects.

One of the key culprits in the formation of blood clots is an enzyme called thrombin. It works by creating the cross links between clots to make them stronger. But the new approach being developed by scientists from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute and the University of Melbourne looks to use its powers for good.
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