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How to convert connective tissue directly into neurons | KurzweilAI

How to convert connective tissue directly into neurons | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Repression of a single protein in ordinary fibroblasts (connective tissue) is sufficient to directly convert them into functional neurons, scientists in the U.S. and China have discovered.

 

The findings could have far-reaching implications for the development of new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

 

 

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PrintAlive 3D bioprinter creates on-demand skin grafts for burn victims

PrintAlive 3D bioprinter creates on-demand skin grafts for burn victims | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A couple of engineering students at the University of Toronto have created the PrintAlive, a 3D printer that produces skin grafts for burn victims on demand...
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Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer’s Reversed for First Time

Memory Loss Associated with Alzheimer’s Reversed for First Time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new study suggests memory loss in Alzheimer's patients may be reversed.



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The study used a complex multi-prong therapeutic system. Notably, many of the strategies in the system are also components of Ray & Terry's recommendations for longevity and optimal health.

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Eric Larson's curator insight, October 1, 8:21 AM

Alzheimer's reversed????

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Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer

Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it


Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other institutions have discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear. The research is being published online today by the journal Nature Medicine.

Although the increase isn't large enough to be the basis of a new test for early detection of the disease, the findings will help researchers better understand how pancreatic cancer affects the rest of the body, particularly how it can trigger the sometimes deadly muscle-wasting disease known as cachexia.


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Artificial intelligence program that learns like a child

Artificial intelligence program that learns like a child | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An artificial intelligence program created at the University of Gothenburg imitates a child's cognitive development to learn basic arithmetic, logic, and gr...
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Gene therapy helps weak mice grow strong

Gene therapy helps weak mice grow strong | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A virus that shuttles a therapeutic gene into cells has strengthened the muscles, improved the motor skills, and lengthened the lifespan of mice afflicted with two neuromuscular diseases. The approach could one day help people with a range of similar disorders, from muscular dystrophy to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS.



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Newly-discovered on/off switch could hold the key to healthy aging

Newly-discovered on/off switch could hold the key to healthy aging | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Salk Institute have discovered an on/off switch for telomerase, an enzyme that rebuilds a cellular timekeeper known as a telomere. The scientists believe that the discovery could provide a way to get human cells to divide indefinitely without degenerating, thereby regenerating healthy organs even in old age.Telomeres, which can be likened to caps at the end of chromosomes that protect against deterioration, shorten as we age. Once they are too short for the cell to divide, organs and tissues degenerate
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Interactive Bionic Man, featuring 14 novel biotechnologies | KurzweilAI

Interactive Bionic Man, featuring 14 novel biotechnologies | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has launched the “NIBIB Bionic Man,” an interactive Web tool that showcases cutting-edge research in biotechnology.


The bionic man features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers.



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The $1 Million Race For The Cure To End Aging | TechCrunch

The $1 Million Race For The Cure To End Aging | TechCrunch | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The hypothesis is so absurd it seems as though it popped right off the pages of a science-fiction novel. Some scientists in Palo Alto are offering a $1..
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Exclusive: Two Apple medical trials shed light on how HealthKit will work

Exclusive: Two Apple medical trials shed light on how HealthKit will work | Longevity science | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Two prominent U.S. hospitals are preparing to launch trials with diabetics and chronic disease patients using Apple Inc's (AAPL.O) HealthKit, offering a glimpse of how the iPhone maker's ambitious take on healthcare will work in practice.HealthKit, which is still under development, is the center of a new healthcare system by Apple. Regulated medical devices, such as glucose monitors with accompanying iPhone apps, can send information to HealthKit. With a patient's consent, Apple's service gathers data from various health apps so that it can be viewed by doctors in one place.
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Longevity Gene in Fruit Flies Hints at Coming Genetic Discoveries to Slow Aging

Longevity Gene in Fruit Flies Hints at Coming Genetic Discoveries to Slow Aging | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In a recent study, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), say that activating a gene, AMPK, in fruit flies’ intestines was found to add 30% to their average lifespans—up to eight weeks from the typical six weeks.


Beyond simply boosting lifespans, the flies stayed healthier too.



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Milestone reached in building replacement kidneys in the lab | KurzweilAI

Milestone reached in building replacement kidneys in the lab | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Regenerative medicine researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina have developed what they say is the most successful method to date to keep blood vessels in new human-sized pig kidney organs open and flowing with blood — a major challenge in the quest to build replacement kidneys in the lab.



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Activating gene in key organ systems slows aging process throughout the body

Activating gene in key organ systems slows aging process throughout the body | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of biologists at UCLA have significantly slowed the aging process in fruit flies by activating a gene called AMPK. Possibly of more interest to us hi...
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Scientists regenerate rat muscle tissue, with an eye toward human applications

Scientists regenerate rat muscle tissue, with an eye toward human applications | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Stem cells in rats and mice have been mobilized to form new muscle tissue in situ (i.e., in the body), possibly paving the way for similar treatment in pe...
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Seaweed could provide a safer alternative to antibacterial silver

Seaweed could provide a safer alternative to antibacterial silver | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Silver nanoparticles are very effective at killing bacteria... [but] there are some major concerns regarding the effects that those particles may have on human health and on the environment. Among other things, it has been suggested that they cause cell death, and compromise the immune system. Now, however, scientists at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology have come up with what could be a less harmful alternative – red algae.


More specifically, the KTH team is looking at lanosol, which is an antibacterial compound found in red Rhodophyta seaweed.


It is now hoped that lanosol-based materials could find use in wound dressings or air filters in hospitals. Such applications would be particularly appropriate, as lanosol has been shown to kill 99.99 percent of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, which is the leading cause of skin and wound infections in hospital settings.

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Eric Larson's curator insight, October 1, 8:19 AM

I know that kelp has some wonderful benefits.

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Walking is the superfood of fitness, experts say

Walking is the superfood of fitness, experts say | Longevity science | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters) - Walking may never become as trendy as CrossFit, as sexy as mud runs or as ego-boosting as Ironman races but for fitness experts who stress daily movement over workouts and an active
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Pulley mechanism implant to better restore hand function

Pulley mechanism implant to better restore hand function | Longevity science | Scoop.it

We've seen a number of robotic prosthetic hands intended for amputees, but what about those that still have their hands but have lost function through nerve damage? Researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) have tackled the problem and come up with an implant consisting of a simple pulley system that would more effectively transfer mechanical forces and allow more natural grasping function with less effort.


Unlike the nerve transfer technique we looked at a couple of years ago that reroutes nerves in the upper arms of patients with spinal cord injury at the C7 vertebra to restore some hand function, the technique developed at OSU connects multiple finger tendons to a single muscle via a passive hierarchical artificial pulley system.



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Building lab-on-chip devices could soon be like playing with Lego

Building lab-on-chip devices could soon be like playing with Lego | Longevity science | Scoop.it
With their ability to guide and analyze tiny quantities of liquid, microfluidic "lab-on-chip" devices have found use in everything fromseawater desalination to explosives detection tothe viewing of viruses. Each time a new type of device is created, however, it must be built from scratch. This can be time-consuming and costly, as the fabrication of multiple prototypes is a traditional part of the trial-and-error development process. Now, however, building them may be as simple as mixing and matching prefabricated Lego-like modules.
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Wearable Artificial Kidney gets green light for US trials

Wearable Artificial Kidney gets green light for US trials | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In 2009, we had a look at the Wearable Artificial Kidney (WAK) concept. The device has now been granted approval for human testing in the United States by t...
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DARPA working on portable and ruggedized artificial "biospleen" to fight sepsis

DARPA working on portable and ruggedized artificial "biospleen" to fight sepsis | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The reason why infection is so dangerous in both the military and civilian spheres is because it can lead to sepsis. That is, the body overreacts to the infection with often fatal results.


DARPA is developing an artificial spleen, or "biospleen," as a way to help fight deadly infections without antibiotics.



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How to quickly convert human skin cells into immune-fighting white blood cells | KurzweilAI

How to quickly convert human skin cells into immune-fighting white blood cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Salk Institute scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders.


The process, described in the journal Stem Cells, is “quick and safe in mice,” says senior author Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, holder of Salk’s Roger Guillemin Chair.



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An in-depth look at Team Aezon's Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE entry

An in-depth look at Team Aezon's Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE entry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE aims to stimulate advances in the field of diagnostic equipment, with the incentive of a US$10 million prize purse. Such technology has the potential to revolutionize the speed and accuracy with which a diagnosis can be made outside of a hospital environment.
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Scientists 'reset' stem cells to study start of human development

Scientists 'reset' stem cells to study start of human development | Longevity science | Scoop.it

British and Japanese scientists have managed to "reset" human stem cells to their earliest state, opening up a new realm of research into the start of human development and potentially life-saving regenerative medicines.



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New synthetic gene circuits can perform complex bio-logic tasks | KurzweilAI

New synthetic gene circuits can perform complex bio-logic tasks | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Kansas Medical Center are making genetic circuits that can perform complex tasks by swapping protein building blocks.


The modular genetic circuits,  which are engineered from parts of otherwise unrelated bacterial genomes, can be set up to handle multiple chemical inputs simultaneously with a minimum of interference from their neighbors.


The work, reported in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Synthetic Biology, gives scientists more options as they design synthetic cells for specific tasks, such as production of biofuels, environmental remediation, or treatments for human diseases.



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How to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases | KurzweilAI

How to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Bristol researchers have discovered how to stop cells from attacking healthy body tissue in debilitating autoimmune diseases (such as multiple sclerosis), where the body’s immune system destroys its own tissue by mistake.


The cells were converted from being aggressive to actually protecting against disease.



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Honey, we could have a new weapon in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Honey, we could have a new weapon in the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A study at at Sweden's Lund University have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in the honey stomach of bees and passed onto fresh ho...
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Eric Larson's curator insight, September 10, 9:33 AM

Honey is more important than you may think,