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We’re all living longer, but longevity increases not benefitting everybody | KurzweilAI

We’re all living longer, but longevity increases not benefitting everybody | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
GDP $ per capita vs. life expectancy for 180 countries. In 2007 everyone lives longer than in 1970 because the health system is better, but in both cases,

 

Global lifespans have risen dramatically in the past 40 years, but the increased life expectancy is not benefitting body equally, say University of Toronto researchers. In particular, adult males from low- and middle-income countries are losing ground.

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New algorithm identifies weak spots in body tissue prior to injury

New algorithm identifies weak spots in body tissue prior to injury | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Muscle and tendon strains or tears may soon be detectable prior to injury, thanks to new algorithms developed by researchers at Washington University in St ...
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When it comes to muscle, tendon, and bone injuries, early diagnosis can save you from a world of hurt and lengthy rehabilitation. Researchers at Washington University in St Louis have developed algorithms that may one day – after some refinement in imaging techniques – identify tiny strains before they turn into serious injuries.


The researchers combined mechanical engineering with image-analysis techniques to create the algorithms, one of which they measured as being 1,000 times more accurate than older methods at quantifying very large stretches near tiny cracks and tears. Another algorithm predicts where cracks are likely to form.

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Gut bacteria discovery could lead to probiotic therapy for food allergies

Gut bacteria discovery could lead to probiotic therapy for food allergies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The latest cause for hope, which could one day let food allergy sufferers order in restaurants without worrying about potentially life-threatening ingredien...
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Eric Larson's curator insight, September 1, 6:51 PM

Some stomach problems may get solved.

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UA Discovery Shows Curcumin Blocks the Metastasis of Colon Cancer by a Novel Mechanism | AHSC Office of Public Affairs

UA Discovery Shows Curcumin Blocks the Metastasis of Colon Cancer by a Novel Mechanism | AHSC Office of Public Affairs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of researchers led by the University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center discovered that curcumin—the bioactive molecule derived from the spice turmeric—blocks the protein cortactin in colon cancer.


Cortactin, a protein essential for cell movement, frequently is overexpressed in cancer, thus facilitating cancer cell metastasis to other organs in the body.

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Eye pressure-monitoring implant could save glaucoma patients from blindness

Eye pressure-monitoring implant could save glaucoma patients from blindness | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Currently, people with glaucoma must have their internal optic pressure (the pressure within their eye) regularly checked by a specialist. A new implant, ho...
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Pediatric surgical robot inspired by ISS remote manipulator arm

Pediatric surgical robot inspired by ISS remote manipulator arm | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Robots and space technology may soon be saving children's lives thanks to KidsArm, a robotic arm for delicate pediatric surgery built in collaboration with ...
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Functional thymus organ grown in mice from lab-created cells | KurzweilAI

Functional thymus organ grown in mice from lab-created cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have for the first time grown a complex, fully functional organ from scratch in a living animal by transplanting cells that were originally created in a laboratory to form a replacement thymus, a vital organ of the immune system.The advance could in the future aid the development of “lab-grown” replacement organs.Researchers from the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, at the University of Edinburgh, took cells called fibroblasts from a mouse embryo and converted them directly into a completely unrelated type of cell — specialized thymus cells — using a technique called “reprogramming.”
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How lizards regenerate their tails: researchers discover genetic ‘recipe’ | KurzweilAI

How lizards regenerate their tails: researchers discover genetic ‘recipe’ | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
“Lizards basically share the same toolbox of genes as humans,” said lead author Kenro Kusumi, professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences and associate dean in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “We discovered that they turn on at least 326 genes in specific regions of the regenerating tail, including genes involved in embryonic development, response to hormonal signals, and wound healing.”
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Laser device detects blood glucose levels without the finger-prick

Laser device detects blood glucose levels without the finger-prick | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a non-invasive way to test blood glucose levels using a laser.Like a number of other blood glucose measuring research efforts we've seen in recent years, such as carbon nanotube "tattoos" and biochips that measure glucose in saliva, the Princeton team's method doesn't require direct analysis of a blood sample.
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Yoga Gave Aging Brains a Boost

New study finds that yoga can benefit aging brains
The recent University of Illinois study involved 108 adults between the ages of 55 and 79, of whom 61 attended hatha yoga classes.
The other volunteers met for the same number and length of sessions, but they engaged in stretching and toning exercises instead of yoga.
At the end of the eight weeks, the yoga group was speedier and more accurate on tests of information recall, mental flexibility and task-switching than it had been before the intervention.
In contrast, the stretching-and-toning group saw no significant change in cognitive performance over time.
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‘Nanojuice’ could help diagnose gastrointestinal illnesses | KurzweilAI

‘Nanojuice’ could help diagnose gastrointestinal illnesses | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The combination of nanojuice and photoacoustic tomography illuminates the intestine of a mouse (credit: Jonathan Lovell) University at Buffalo researchers
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Spongy polymer developed to fill holes in bones

Spongy polymer developed to fill holes in bones | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Whether they're the result of injuries, surgery or birth defects such as cleft palate, missing sections of bone in the skull or jaw can certainly affect someone's appearance. Although there are some methods of filling in such gaps, they have limitations that limit their application. A newly-developed foam-like material, however, may be able to succeed where other approaches have failed.Usually, bone defects in the head, face or jaw are filled using either bone harvested from another part of the patient's body (such as the hip), or a material such as bone putty.
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Complex 3D physical tissue model simulates live cortex biochemical and electrical behavior | KurzweilAI

Complex 3D physical tissue model simulates live cortex biochemical and electrical behavior | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Silk 3D brain tissue model of the six neocortex layers, dyed with food color (credit: Tufts University) Tufts University researchers have developed the
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Synthetic molecule uses salt to trigger self-destruction of cancer cells

Synthetic molecule uses salt to trigger self-destruction of cancer cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of international researchers has developed a molecule capable of triggering cancer cell death by carrying chloride into cancer cell membranes. The molecule flushes the cells with salt and causes them to self-destruct, potentially paving the way for new types of anti-cancer drugs.The international effort involves researchers from the UK, Texas and South Korea who have collaborated to develop a synthetic ion transporter with a chloride payload. Once it reaches the cancer cells, the chloride interacts with the sodium in the cell membranes and leads to its demise.
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Cartilage grown from patients' noses used to repair their knees

Cartilage grown from patients' noses used to repair their knees | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Depending on the part of the body and the nature of the injury, cartilage either doesn’t grow back at all, or does so very slowly. Now, however, researchers...
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U.S. startups get OK for smartphone-based heart tracking

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - For a growing U.S. aging population, tracking heart health via a smartphone can mean the difference between life and death.


This week, two Silicon Valley startups received a green-light from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for mobile applications that monitor patients from home


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Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules | KurzweilAI

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The research group of Arun K. Sharma*, PhD has developed a system for patients with urinary bladder dysfunction that may protect them against an inflammatory reaction** resulting from tissue regeneration, which can negatively impact tissue growth, development and function.


The researchers treated a highly pro-inflammatory biologic scaffold with anti-inflammatory peptide amphiphiles (AIF-PAs). (Self-assembling peptide amphiphiles, or PAs, are biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials used in a wide range of settings and applications.) When compared with control PAs, the treated scaffold reduced the innate inflammatory response, resulting in superior bladder function.



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AdnanD's curator insight, August 29, 12:32 PM

A very very interesting read 

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Surgeons replace a 12-year-old's cancerous vertebra with a 3D-printed implant

Surgeons replace a 12-year-old's cancerous vertebra with a 3D-printed implant | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The latest surgery brought to you by the seemingly endless possibilities of 3D-printing comes at the hands of doctors at China's Peking University Third Hos...
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New diabetes treatment would turn liver cells into insulin-producers

New diabetes treatment would turn liver cells into insulin-producers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Tel Aviv-based regenerative medicine firm Orgenesis is currently developing a diabetes treatment that it claims addresses many of the shortcomings of islet ...
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New gene editing method corrects muscular dystrophy in mice

New gene editing method corrects muscular dystrophy in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new technique for gene editing that removes a mutation leading to a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy could have far-reaching consequences in the...
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3D-printed implants infused with medicine to enable more effective drug delivery

3D-printed implants infused with medicine to enable more effective drug delivery | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A great strength of 3D-printing in the field of medicine is the ability to provide low-cost implants molded to a patient's anatomy. Researchers have taken t...
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, August 23, 12:01 PM

"One of the greatest benefits of this technology is that it can be done using any consumer printer and can be used anywhere in the world,"

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Fish Oil May Help Seniors Stay Strong

After six months, the women who took fish oil supplements had developed significantly higher blood levels of omega-3 DHA and lower levels of omega-6 AA (a generally pro-inflammatory fatty acid).
 
And, compared to the placebo group, the fish oil group showed improvements in walking speed and reduced levels of a key marker for inflammation (TNF-alpha).
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Vital Choice publishes an excellent newsletter. They report on many nutritional research studies. Highly recommended.

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Antibacterial gel uses natural proteins to kill off hospital superbugs

Antibacterial gel uses natural proteins to kill off hospital superbugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Drug-resistant bacteria, also known as superbugs, pose a very real threat to public health and well-being. Scientists have developed an antibacterial gel ca...
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Artificial cells mimic natural protein synthesis | KurzweilAI

Artificial cells mimic natural protein synthesis | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Fluorescent image of DNA (white squares) patterned in circular compartments connected by capillary tubes to the cell-free extract flowing in the channel at
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Injected bacteria found to reduce tumors in rats, dogs and humans

Injected bacteria found to reduce tumors in rats, dogs and humans | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Bacteria found in soil called Clostridium novyi (C. novyi) is known to cause tissue-damaging infections. But researchers from John Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a modified version that triggers an anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and humans. The breakthrough could complement existing methods to provide better targeted treatment of cancerous growths.



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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, August 16, 1:14 PM

BACTERIA TRIGGERS ANTI-TUMOR RESPONSE-MAY PROVIDE TARGETED TREATMENT FOR CANCER 

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Anti-Anxiety Drug Makes Fish Live Longer

Anti-Anxiety Drug Makes Fish Live Longer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

On the one hand, fish exposed to the tranquilizer oxazepam when it seeps into their waters kind of become jerks, reports a study in Nature. On the other hand, this same drug, a benzodiazepine used to treat anxiety and insomnia in human adults, apparently helps them live longer, reports Nature World News, citing a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters. This news may be, from a longevity standpoint, terrific for the tainted fish—but it's not ideal for keeping the entire ecosystem's mortality rates balanced and the food chain intact.



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

One question: Do we want to become tranquilized jerks to live longer? More research is needed :)

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