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We’re all living longer, but longevity increases not benefitting everybody | KurzweilAI

We’re all living longer, but longevity increases not benefitting everybody | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
GDP $ per capita vs. life expectancy for 180 countries. In 2007 everyone lives longer than in 1970 because the health system is better, but in both cases,

 

Global lifespans have risen dramatically in the past 40 years, but the increased life expectancy is not benefitting body equally, say University of Toronto researchers. In particular, adult males from low- and middle-income countries are losing ground.

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Longevity science
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How Stem Cells May Save Your Life—and Even Extend It - Singularity HUB

How Stem Cells May Save Your Life—and Even Extend It - Singularity HUB | Longevity science | Scoop.it
You are a collection of over 30 trillion human cells.

Every one of these cells, those in your brain, lungs, liver, skin, and everywhere else, derives from a single pluripotent type of cell called a stem cell.

This post is about how stem cells are going to change medicine forever, extend life, and potentially save your life in the years ahead.

In this blog we'll talk about why it's important to bank the cells of your newborn children or grandchildren — and potentially your own (no matter how old you are).
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New company plans to revolutionize genomic medicine with deep learning

New company plans to revolutionize genomic medicine with deep learning | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Deep learning has already had a huge impact on computer vision and speech recognition, and it's making inroads in areas as computer-unfriendly as cooking. Now a new startup led by University of Toronto professor Brendan Frey wants to cause similar reverberations in genomic medicine. Deep Genomics plans to identify gene variants and mutations never before observed or studied and find how these link to various diseases. And through this work the company believes it can help usher in a new era of personalized medicine.

Genomic research is hard. Scientists still know relatively little about our genes and how they interrelate. But Frey and others in the field now know enough that they can equip machines to do the heavy lifting. And there's an awful lot of this heavy lifting to do. "Genomics is no longer about small datasets," Frey tells Gizmag. "It's now about very, very large datasets."
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Super-elastic conducting fibers for artificial muscles, sensors, capacitors | KurzweilAI

Super-elastic conducting fibers for artificial muscles, sensors, capacitors | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An international research team based at The University of Texas at Dallas has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to more than 14 times their initial length and whose electrical conductivity increases 200-fold when stretched.

The research team is using the new fibers to make artificial muscles, as well as capacitors with energy storage capacity that increases about tenfold when the fibers are stretched.
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Common chemicals may act together to increase cancer risk, international study finds | KurzweilAI

Common chemicals may act together to increase cancer risk, international study finds | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Common environmental chemicals assumed to be safe at low doses may act separately or together to disrupt human tissues in ways that eventually lead to cancer, according to a task force of almost 200 scientists from 28 countries.

In a nearly three-year investigation of the state of knowledge about environmentally influenced cancers, the scientists studied low-dose effects of 85 common chemicals not considered to be carcinogenic to humans.

Common chemicals

The researchers reviewed the actions of these chemicals against a long list of mechanisms that are important for cancer development. Drawing on hundreds of laboratory studies, large databases of cancer information, and models that predict cancer development, they compared the chemicals’ biological activity patterns to 11 known cancer “hallmarks” – distinctive patterns of cellular and genetic disruption associated with early development of tumors.
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Delayed Turnover | The Scientist Magazine®

Delayed Turnover | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
After age 65, a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease doubles every five years. A study published this week (July 20) in the Annals of Neurology no offers up one clue why. Scientists at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and their colleagues found that the kinetics of amyloid β—a protein that can form destructive plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s—change as people age, increasing its chance of accumulating.

Study coauthor Randall Bateman, a neuroscientist at Washington University, told Science News that slowed turnover of amyloid β in older people may make plaque formation more likely.
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Pill on a string pulls early signs of cancer

Pill on a string pulls early signs of cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The current approach of detecting the cancer through biopsy can be a little hit and miss, so the University of Cambridge's Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald and her team have developed what they claim to be a more accurate tool for early-diagnosis. Billed as "a pill on a string," the Cytosponge is designed to scrape off cells from the length of the oesophagus as it is yanked out after swallowing, offering up a much larger sample for inspection of cancer cells.
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Coffee drinking may lower inflammation, reduce diabetes risk

Coffee drinking may lower inflammation, reduce diabetes risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Coffee drinkers in a long-term study were about half as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as those who didn't drink coffee, and researchers think an inflammation-lowering effect of the beverage might be the key.

“Extensive research has revealed that coffee drinking exhibits both beneficial and aggravating health effects,” said Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos of the department of Nutrition and Dietetics at Harokopio University in Athens, Greece.
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How to regenerate axons to recover from spinal-cord injury | KurzweilAI

How to regenerate axons to recover from spinal-cord injury | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have found a way to help patients recover from chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) by stimulating the growth of axons.

Chronic SCI prevents a large number of injured axons from crossing a lesion, particularly in the corticospinal tract (CST). Patients inflicted with SCI often suffer a loss of mobility and paralysis that is often permanent.

As reported in the July 1st issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, they found that deleting the PTEN gene in mice neurons results in stimulation of growth of axons across the lesion (wound) and past it —- even when treatment was delayed up to 1 year after the original injury.
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Genetic Variants Linked to Depression | The Scientist Magazine®

Genetic Variants Linked to Depression | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers have confirmed a genetic link to depression for the first time. Variations in two genes appeared more frequently in a population with major depressive disorder, according to a study published last week (July 15) in Nature.

“This is an important study because it convincingly identifies DNA variations linked to depression for the first time,” Jordan Smoller, a psychiatrist at Harvard University who was not involved in the study told The Verge. “It provides clues to the underlying biology of depression—and perhaps new targets for developing treatments.”
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Mitochondria Swap | The Scientist Magazine®

Mitochondria Swap | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have used two methods to generate patient-specific pluripotent stem cells with normal mitochondria for people with defects in these organelles, according to a study published today (July 15) in Nature.


The first method generates stem cells for people with some normal mitochondria and some defective ones, a state called heteroplasmy. The researchers isolated fibroblasts from these patients and reprogrammed them to into multiple lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). They then tested these iPSC lines for mitochondrial mutations, selecting cells that had ended up with only nonmutated mitochondria following many cell divisions and mitochondrial redistributions.


The second method, which works for patients who have no nonmutated mitochondria, involves...

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Vitamin A is for anti-aging, at least when it comes to vision

Vitamin A is for anti-aging, at least when it comes to vision | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Vitamin A isn’t actually one nutrient. It is a group of related nutrients, each of which provides us with different benefits. There are essentially two forms of the vitamin: retinoids, or preformed vitamin A, found in animal products and carotenoids; and provitamin A, dark-colored plant pigments that are converted to vitamin A in the body.
Retinoids

● Health benefits: Retinoids are important for the healthy development of fetuses and infants, children’s growth, vision, red blood cell production and resistance to infectious disease.
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Brrrr-ying the Results | The Scientist Magazine®

Brrrr-ying the Results | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Repasky and her Roswell Park colleagues held mice modeling tumor growth at two different temperatures—either at the standard temperature of about 22 °C or at 30 °C, a temperature in the middle of their TNZ. What Repasky and her colleagues found was nothing less than astonishing.

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Surgical team simulates zero-gravity surgery

Surgical team simulates zero-gravity surgery | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A surgical team recently carried out a simulated operation aboard a Canadian research jet designed to create weightless conditions.

Surgery on Earth is hard enough, but at least the patient and all his insides stay put thanks to gravity. In zero gravity, things get a lot more complicated – the patient needs to be secured, organs drift where they aren't supposed to, and blood could quickly become unmanageable.

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"Compound 14" mimics the effects of exercise without setting foot in the gym

"Compound 14" mimics the effects of exercise without setting foot in the gym | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Enjoying the health benefits of a back-breaking workout without actually working out sure is a tantalizing prospect. This goes a long way to explaining the torrent of exercise equipment that promises to do more for our figures with less of our sweat and tears, and recently, the development of drugs that could imitate the beneficial effects of exercise. The latest advance in this area is the development of a molecule that mimics the effects of exercise by influencing the metabolic process, giving it the potential to treat type 2 diabetes and obesity.

The scientists at the University of Southampton who developed the molecule initially set out to target the central energy sensor in cells called AMPK. Pointing to previous research, the team believed...

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Silk-based functional inks put biosensor data on your fingertips

Silk-based functional inks put biosensor data on your fingertips | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at Tufts University have now developed silk-based inks containing bacteria-sensing agents that can withstand the rigors of inkjet printing, opening the door much wider for printing biomolecules.
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An anti-inflammatory ‘smart drug’ that activates only in high-inflammation areas | KurzweilAI

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) in Israel and University of Colorado researchers have developed a dynamic anti-inflammatory “smart” drug that can target specific sites in the body and could enhance the body’s natural ability to fight infection while reducing side effects.

This protein molecule, reported in the current issue of Journal of Immunology, has an exceptional property: when injected, it’s non-active. But upon reaching a local site with excessive inflammation, it becomes activated. Most other anti-inflammatory agents have broad effects in the body.
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The CRISPR craze: genome editing technologies poised to revolutionize medicine and industry | KurzweilAI

The CRISPR craze: genome editing technologies poised to revolutionize medicine and industry | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
CRISPR/Cas systems for genome editing have revolutionized biological research over the past three years, and their ability to make targeted changes in DNA sequences in living cells with relative ease and affordability is now being applied to clinical medicine and will have a significant impact on advances in drug and other therapies, agriculture, and food products.
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Bone Marrow Makes New Fat Cells | The Scientist Magazine®

Bone Marrow Makes New Fat Cells | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The origins of new fat cells (adipocytes), which we humans must make throughout our lives, have not been clear. Rodent studies have produced conflicting results on where adipocyte progenitors come from, particularly with regard to the bone marrow as a possible source. Reporting today (July 16) in Cell Metabolism, researchers have found that, in patients who received bone marrow transplants, donor cells contribute to new fat tissue, and that the proportion of these bone marrow-derived adipocytes is higher in obese patients.

“In these bone marrow-transplanted individuals, they can actually find fat cells with genomic information from the donor and not from the recipient,”
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Research indicates that stem cells could be used to heal damaged lungs

Research indicates that stem cells could be used to heal damaged lungs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Respiratory diseases such as bronchitis, emphysema and asthma are extremely prevalent, with more than 35 million sufferers in the US alone. Now, a team from the Weizmann Institute of Science has worked to create a new treatment for repairing damaged lung tissue, using the procedure for bone marrow stem cell transplantation as a template.
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Laser device may soon non-invasively monitor diabetics' glucose levels

Laser device may soon non-invasively monitor diabetics' glucose levels | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In order to monitor their blood glucose levels, diabetics typically have to perform painful and inconvenient finger-prick blood tests – in some cases, several times a day. Using an implantable glucose-monitoring sensor is one alternative, although it must be surgically installed and subsequently removed for replacement. Another option may be on the way, however, in the form of a device that simply shines a laser on the user's finger.

Known as GlucoSense, the system was developed by Prof. Gin Jose and his team at the University of Leeds.

To use it, patients simply place the pad of their finger against a small glass window on the device.
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Mitochondria Swap | The Scientist Magazine®

Mitochondria Swap | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have used two methods to generate patient-specific pluripotent stem cells with normal mitochondria for people with defects in these organelles, according to a study published today (July 15) in Nature. The first method generates stem cells for people with some normal mitochondria and some defective ones, a state called heteroplasmy. The researchers isolated fibroblasts from these patients and reprogrammed them to into multiple lines of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).
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New drug showing incredible results in treating lung cancer

New drug showing incredible results in treating lung cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
More than 200,000 people will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year and almost 160,000 people will die from it.

Now, a drug that is showing incredible results in treating lung cancer has doctors more hopeful than ever.
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Need a new knee? Heart valve? Back surgery? This Web site could help you find the top surgeons near you.

A nonprofit consumers group has come out with a free surgeon rating tool that allows consumers to type in a Zip code and search for the top-performing surgeons in 14 types of major surgery. They include: heart valve and bypass surgery, total knee and hip replacement, gastric (stomach), hernia, and spine fusion surgery.

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Restoring Hearing in Mice With Gene Therapy

Restoring Hearing in Mice With Gene Therapy | Longevity science | Scoop.it
More than 70 different genes are known to cause deafness when mutated. Jeffrey Holt, PhD, envisions a day when patients with hearing loss have their genome sequenced and their hearing restored by gene therapy. A proof-of-principle study published today by the journal Science Translational Medicine takes a clear step in that direction, restoring hearing in deaf mice.
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Ultrasound cuts healing time of chronic wounds by 30 percent

Ultrasound cuts healing time of chronic wounds by 30 percent | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers discovered that applying the vibrations of an ultrasound served to stimulate a certain pathway that substitutes for the regular fibroblast migration route and recruits the cells to the wound bed
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