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On Living Forever

On Living Forever | Longevity science | Scoop.it

“Wouldn’t you eventually get bored?” Like clockwork, the question arises when I tell someone quixotically, arrogantly, that I plan on living forever. From the limited perspective of 20 years, even the prospect of living another six or seven decades in full color can be impossible to envisage. Hedging, I answer that assuming a world where radical life extension is possible, there will be no telling as to how different the human experience will be from what we know—that is to say, where 200-year-olds won’t merely be stuck playing very, very slow mah-jongg.

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Longevity science
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Steering the epigenome to turn specific genes on | KurzweilAI

Steering the epigenome to turn specific genes on | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
(credit: Human Epigenome Project) Duke University researchers have developed a new method to precisely control when genes are turned on and active: by
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Are populations aging more slowly than we think? | KurzweilAI

Are populations aging more slowly than we think? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increases in life expectancy do not necessarily produce faster overall population aging, according to new open-access research published in the journal PLOS ONE.

This counterintuitive finding was the result of applying new measures of aging, developed at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) to future population projections for Europe up to the year 2050.
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Master protein found to enhance both muscles and the brain | KurzweilAI

Master protein found to enhance both muscles and the brain | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Salk Institute for Biological Studies scientists and collaborators have discovered that physical and mental activities rely on a single metabolic protein called estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) that controls the flow of blood and nutrients throughout the body.

The new study could point to potential treatments in regenerative and developmental medicine as well as ways to address defects in learning and memory.

“This is all about getting energy where it’s needed to ‘the power plants’ in the body,” says Ronald Evans, director of Salk’s Gene Expression Laboratory and senior author of the new paper, published April 7 in the journal Cell Metabolism.
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3D neural reconstruction guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels | KurzweilAI

3D neural reconstruction guided with biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds and hydrogels | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Damage to neural tissue is typically permanent and causes lasting disability in patients. But a method for reconstructing neural tissue using patterned nanofibers in 3D hydrogel structures promises to one day help in the restoration of functional neuroanatomical pathways and structures at sites of spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, tumor resection, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Richard J. McMurtrey, director of the Institute of Neural Regeneration & Tissue Engineering and affiliated with the University of Oxford, found that neurite outgrowth from neurons in the hydrogel followed the nanofiber scaffolding, particularly when the nanofibers were coated with a type of cell adhesion molecule called laminin. The coated nanofibers also enhanced the length of growing neurites.
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‘Google Maps’ for the body | KurzweilAI

‘Google Maps’ for the body | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Biomedical engineer Melissa Knothe Tate at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia is using previously proprietary semiconductor technology to zoom through organs of the human body, down to the level of a single cell.

The imaging technology, developed by high-tech German optical and industrial measurement manufacturer Zeiss, was originally developed to scan silicon wafers for defects.

UNSW Professor Melissa Knothe Tate, the Paul Trainor Chair of Biomedical Engineering, is leading the project, which is using semiconductor technology to explore osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

Using Google algorithms, Tate — an engineer and expert in cell biology and regenerative medicine – is able to zoom in and out from the scale of the whole joint down to the cellular level “just as you would with Google Maps,” reducing to “a matter of weeks analyses that once took 25 years to complete”.
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Biohackers develop night vision eye drops to see in the dark

Biohackers develop night vision eye drops to see in the dark | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It sounds like something from a science-fiction movie, but a biohacking group in California has managed to develop eye drops that temporarily give a human being excellent night vision. The chemicals used are still very much at the experimental stage – this isn't something you'd want to try at home just yet – but the first trial has been a successful one.

The main ingredient in the eye drop solution is Chlorin e6. It's found in certain deep sea fish, enabling them to find their way around underwater, and it's also been used to treat humans with poor night vision. Essentially, it creates a microscopic chemical reaction that amplifies low light sources as they pass through.
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Employer incentives for U.S. worker wellness programs set record

Employer incentives for U.S. worker wellness programs set record | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Employers have ratcheted up the financial incentives they offer workers to participate in wellness programs to a record $693 per employee, on average, this year from $594 in 2014 and $430 five years ago, found a report released on Thursday.

And fewer employers are imposing penalties such as charging more for insurance if workers do not participate or achieve goals such as losing weight.
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Shape-memory wire simulates muscle in high-precision artificial hand

Shape-memory wire simulates muscle in high-precision artificial hand | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Whether they're on robots or amputees, artificial hands tend to be rather complex mechanisms, incorporating numerous motor-driven cables. Engineers from Germany's Saarland University, however, have taken a different approach with their hand. It moves its fingers via shape-memory nickel-titanium alloy wires, bundled together to perform intricate tasks by working like natural muscle fibers.

The individual wires are so thin that even when a number of them are wound together, the resulting bundle is still only about as thick as a cotton thread – but it has the tensile strength of a much thicker metal wire.
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Long Live Collagen | The Scientist Magazine®

Long Live Collagen | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Increased collagen expression is a common feature of many different pathways to extended longevity in worms.
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HCx3DP Getting Ready To Panel The Shit Out of NYC

HCx3DP Getting Ready To Panel The Shit Out of NYC | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New York City is getting ready for an invasion by the 3D printing industry, and as 3D Print Week draws closer, we are getting ready to bring you up to speed on all the happenings. As a part of the Meckler Media week-long 3D printing event, meet-ups associated with 3D Print Week will be popping up around New York, including one series devoted specifically to the use of the technology in the field of medicine.
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95-Year-Old Obliterates Running Record Like A Champ

95-Year-Old Obliterates Running Record Like A Champ | Longevity science | Scoop.it
He took up exercise in his 80s and just set a world record. ...


If Charles Eugster is any example, maybe Usain Bolt ought to put off his planned retirement by 60 years or so.


Eugster, 95, obliterated the 95-and-over world indoor record for 200 meters Sunday at a British Masters Athletics meet in London.

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How low- calorie diets can lead to healthy ageing - newkerala news #26107

Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake.

The study focused on a molecule called "AMP-activated protein kinase," or AMPK, which acts as a molecular fuel gauge to detect energy levels. It's been known that AMPK plays important roles in all cell types, but researchers didn't understand which of these activities were most critical to regulating longevity.
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How to get the entire immune system to attack cancer | KurzweilAI

How to get the entire immune system to attack cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The human immune system is poised to spring into action at the first sign of a foreign invader, but it often fails to eliminate tumors that arise from the body’s own cells.
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Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging

Breast tissue provides clues to avoid effects of aging | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Our tissue's inability to repair itself as we grow older is thought to correlate with the decline in the presence of stem cells. So it follows that if stem cell function can be preserved beyond the norm, it could have implications for the aging process and adverse effects of tissue degeneration, such as cancer.


Scientists from the University of Toronto have followed this line of thinking through research on the mammary glands of genetically modified mice, finding that development of the tissue can be manipulated to avoid the effects of aging.

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Geomagnetic compass hooked to the brain allows blind rats to ‘see’ | KurzweilAI

Geomagnetic compass hooked to the brain allows blind rats to ‘see’ | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
By attaching a microstimulator and geomagnetic compass to the brains of blind rats, researchers found that the animals can spontaneously learn to use new information about their location to navigate through a maze, and nearly as well as normally sighted rats.

The researchers say the findings suggest that a similar kind of neuroprosthesis might also help blind people walk freely through the world.

Most notably, perhaps, the findings, reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Thursday April 2, show the incredible flexibility and latent ability of the mammalian brain, says Yuji Ikegaya of the University of Tokyo.
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Non-invasive brain-machine interface gets a grip on bionic hand control

Non-invasive brain-machine interface gets a grip on bionic hand control | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from the University of Houston (UH) has developed an algorithm that enabled a man whose right hand had been amputated to grasp objects using a bionic hand controlled by his thoughts. While we've seen similar accomplishments in recent years, the new technique is non-invasive, capturing brain activity via a scalp EEG.

Research developments in recent years have given amputees much cause for hope with various thought-controlled prosthetic devices. Some have relied on surgically implanted electrodes, while others make use of electrical signals from muscles (known as myoelectric control).
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MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies

MRI-based cancer detection technique could replace biopsies | Longevity science | Scoop.it
While non-invasive imaging technologies such as mammograms or CT scans are capable of detecting tumors, identifying whether they are malignant or benign usually involves getting out the scalpel and conducting a biopsy. Now researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a technique that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to noninvasively detect cancerous cells, offering the potential of supplementing biopsies or maybe one day replacing them altogether.

The team's study, conducted on test tube-grown cells and mice, took advantage of recent findings by other research groups indicating that glucose can be detected without the use of injectable dyes by a fine-tuned MRI technique. Because the outer membranes of certain cancerous cells shed sugar molecules, the Johns Hopkins researchers were able to use this technique to image cancerous cells.
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‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | KurzweilAI

‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed “nanoneedles” that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice.

The researchers, from Imperial College London and Houston Methodist Research Institute in the USA, hope their nanoneedle technique could ultimately help damaged organs and nerves repair themselves and help transplanted organs thrive.

In a trial described in Nature Materials, the team showed they could deliver nucleic acids DNA and siRNA to back muscles in mice. After seven days there was a six-fold increase in the formation of new blood vessels in the mouse back muscles, and blood vessels continued to form over a 14 day period.
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Short, Strong Signals | The Scientist Magazine®

Short, Strong Signals | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Cellular signals transmitted via the protein Notch are critical for an array of developmental processes in animals. But, if poorly regulated, these signals can contribute to pathologies such as cancer. A report published in Science Signaling yesterday (March 24) reveals that part of the mechanism regulating Notch is the addition of methyl groups that boost the protein’s activity—and hasten its demise.
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Scientists create functioning

Scientists create functioning | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have grown functional "mini-lungs" using stems cells derived from the skin cells of patients with a debilitating lung disease. Not only can the development help them in coming up with effective treatments for specific lung diseases like cystic fibrosis, but the process has the potential to be scaled up to screen thousands of new compounds to identify potential new drugs.

Creating miniature organoids has been the focus of many a research group, as it allows scientists to better understand the processes that take place inside an organ, figure out how specific diseases occur and develop or even work towards creating bioengineered lungs.
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3DP @ 2015 White House Science Fair - 3D Printing Industry

3DP @ 2015 White House Science Fair - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it

President Obama announced a huge number of contributions from the private sector to STEM education in the United States, totalling $240M.


Members from the 3D Printing and Maker communities have made some excellent contributions to fund STEM education in the US.

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New ‘MIND’ diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI

New ‘MIND’ diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer’s disease | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new diet known by the acronym MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) could significantly lower a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) — even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

This finding comes from a longitudinal study by Rush University Medical Center and Harvard School of Public Health of 923 volunteers (144 of them developed AD) shows that the MIND diet lowered the risk of AD by as much as 53 percent in participants who adhered to the diet rigorously, and by about 35 percent in those who followed it moderately well.
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3D-printed sensors to lower cost, improve comfort in diabetes management | KurzweilAI

3D-printed sensors to lower cost, improve comfort in diabetes management | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Engineers at Oregon State University have used additive manufacturing to create an improved type of glucose sensor for patients with Type 1 diabetes, part of a system that should work better, cost less, and be more comfortable for the patient.

A key advance is use of an electrohydrodynamic jet (“e-jet” printing) to make the sensor, which detects glucose concentration based on electric current flow. Conceptually, e-jet printing is a little like an inexpensive inkjet printer, but it creates much finer drop sizes and works with biological materials such as enzymes, instead of ink.

It uses a thin polyimide substrate that allows for wrapping the e-jet printed sensors around catheters with high radius of curvature.
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How fatty acids can fight prostate cancer

A mechanism by which omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells has been found by researchers. The findings, which are at odds with a 2013 study asserting that omega-3s increase the risk of prostate cancer, point the way to more effective anti-cancer drugs.
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