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On Living Forever

On Living Forever | Longevity science | Scoop.it

“Wouldn’t you eventually get bored?” Like clockwork, the question arises when I tell someone quixotically, arrogantly, that I plan on living forever. From the limited perspective of 20 years, even the prospect of living another six or seven decades in full color can be impossible to envisage. Hedging, I answer that assuming a world where radical life extension is possible, there will be no telling as to how different the human experience will be from what we know—that is to say, where 200-year-olds won’t merely be stuck playing very, very slow mah-jongg.

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Diabetes Patients Are Hacking Their Way Toward a Bionic Pancreas | WIRED

Diabetes Patients Are Hacking Their Way Toward a Bionic Pancreas | WIRED | Longevity science | Scoop.it

DIY at its best...  A solution that seems so simple it’s crazy it didn’t already exist: an Android app that let him monitor Evan’s blood sugar on a phone. It was kludgy and only he could use it, but it worked. So if Evan was at soccer running around, John could be in the bleachers (or at home) watching glucose levels rise and fall on his smartphone. If they jigged out of range, Costik or his wife could take action.

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FDA approves blood test that predicts risk of coronary heart disease

FDA approves blood test that predicts risk of coronary heart disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Coronary heart disease (CHD) kills more than 385,000 people in the United States each year, and more than half of those who die suddenly have no previous symptoms.


A new blood test that could reduce CHD-related illness and mortality by predicting the risk of future heart disease has been cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The PLAC Test for Lp-PLA2 screens for cardiovascular inflammation which can lead to a build up of rupture-prone plaque and result in a heart attack or stroke.



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3D printed Exo-Prosthetic leg designed to be affordable – and beautiful

3D printed Exo-Prosthetic leg designed to be affordable – and beautiful | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Although 3D printing is revolutionizing prosthesis manufacturing, enabling fast, accessible, low cost production, aesthetics is lagging behind. The Exo-Prosthetic leg could be an alternative to the traditional "robotic" prosthesis, using 3D scanning, modeling and printing technology to create a customizable titanium exoskeleton that replicates the exact form of the amputated limb.
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3D-printed tumor replicas to better measure doses of cancer-fighting drugs

3D-printed tumor replicas to better measure doses of cancer-fighting drugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Administering the correct dosages to fight cancerous tumors can be a difficult balancing act. Too much of the radioactive drugs can cause harm to healthy tissue, but not enough will see the cancer cells survive and continue to spread. But a new technique developed at The Institute of Cancer Research in London may afford doctors an unprecedented level of accuracy in performing radiotherapy, using 3D-printed replicas of a patient’s organs and tumors to better determine how much radiation a tumor has received.
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Could ibuprofen be an anti-aging medicine? | KurzweilAI

Could ibuprofen be an anti-aging medicine? | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Ibuprofen, a common over-the-counter drug used to relieve pain and fever, could hold the keys to a longer healthier life, according to a study by researchers at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. Publishing in PLoS Genetics (open access) December 18, scientists showed that regular doses of ibuprofen extended the lifespan of yeast, worms and fruit flies.

Brian Kennedy, PhD, CEO of the Buck Institute, said treatments, given at doses comparable to those used in humans, extended lifespan an average of 15 percent in the model organisms. “Not only did all the species live longer, but the treated flies and worms appeared more healthy,” he said
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Experimental treatment could target individual cells deep inside the body

Experimental treatment could target individual cells deep inside the body | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new experimental, non-invasive medical technique is promising to precisely deliver drug-carrying metal nanorods anywhere inside the body and image tissue with cellular resolution. If perfected, the approach could be used to treat inoperable deep-tissue tumors, brain trauma, and vascular or degenerative diseases.


The recent forward strides of nanotechnology are opening the door for medical applications that were hard to fathom even just a few years ago, and span from healing broken bones to precisely delivering drug-carrying nanoparticles to fight cancerous cells.



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3D printing points way to smarter cancer treatment

(Reuters) - British scientists have developed a new use for 3D printing, putting it to work to create personalized replica models of cancerous parts of the body to allow doctors to target tumors more precisely.

The initiative is the latest example of medicine harnessing the rapidly emerging technology, which has already been used to manufacture some medical implants.

3D printing makes products by layering material until a three-dimensional object is created. Automotive and aerospace companies use it for producing prototypes as well as creating specialized tools, moldings and some end-use parts.
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Organic blood-oxygen sensor can be stuck on like a Band-Aid

Organic blood-oxygen sensor can be stuck on like a Band-Aid | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Maintaining a steady blood oxygen level is critical for the body to stave off breathing problems and organ trouble. For those needing to keep a close eye on things, there's no shortage of monitoring systems and dedicated pulse oximeters available, but these can be somewhat unwieldy. Scientists at the University of California (UC) Berkeley are looking to make the process a little less cumbersome with the development of a thin, blood-oxygen sensor that can be worn much like a Band-Aid.

Typical pulse oximeters rely on LEDs that shoot both infrared and red light through certain parts of the body, usually a fingertip or earlobe, with a sensor waiting on the receiving end to gauge how much makes it through. As blood that is rich in oxygen absorbs more infrared light, and darker low-oxygen blood absorbs more red light, the sensor assesses the ratio of the two as they come out the other side and gains an indication of the blood's oxygen levels.
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Seven life-changing surgeries made possible by 3D printing

Seven life-changing surgeries made possible by 3D printing | Longevity science | Scoop.it
3D printing is already having a real-life impact. Its capacity to produce customized implants and medical devices tailored specifically to a patient's anatomy has seen it open up all kinds of possibilities in the field of medicine, with the year 2014 having turned up one world-first surgery after another. Let's cast our eye over some of the significant, life-changing procedures to emerge in the past year made possible by 3D printing technology.
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"Fat-burning pill" inches closer to reality

"Fat-burning pill" inches closer to reality | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Harvard University say they have identified two chemical compounds that could replace "bad" fat cells in the human body with healthy fat-burning cells, in what may be the first step toward the development of an effective medical treatment – which could even take the form of a pill – to help control weight gain.

Not all fat is created equal. While white fat cells store energy as lipids and contribute to obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes, the less common brown fat cells pack energy in iron-rich mitochondria...

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Artificial Enzymes from Artificial DNA Challenge Life As We Know It

Artificial Enzymes from Artificial DNA Challenge Life As We Know It | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In the decade or so since the Human Genome Project was completed, synthetic biology has grown rapidly. Impressive advances include the first bacteria to use a chemically-synthesized genome and creation of a synthetic yeast chromosome.

Recently, scientists from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, led by Dr. Philip Hollinger, reported creating the first completely artificial enzymes that are functional. The breakthrough was published in the journal Nature and builds on prior success by the group in creating several artificial nucleotides.
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Vaccine self-assembles into 3D structure to better fight cancer and deadly infections

Vaccine self-assembles into 3D structure to better fight cancer and deadly infections | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have had some success activating the body's immune system to take the fight to cancer and other diseases, a process known as immunotherapy. Now, a new method developed by researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University could advance this form of treatment even further. The technique involves the injection of biomaterials that assemble into 3D scaffolds inside the body to accommodate huge amounts of immune cells, a process that could trigger an attack on deadly infections ranging from HIV to cancer to Ebola.
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Compound kills off malaria by making infected cells appear as aging red blood cells

Compound kills off malaria by making infected cells appear as aging red blood cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Though recent research has given hope to the anti-malaria cause, the deadly disease still claims more than half a million lives each year. A study led by researchers at St Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis suggests that a certain compound results in the body's immune system treating malaria-infected cells the same way it does aging red blood cells, leading to the parasite becoming undetectable in mice within 48 hours.

The researchers discovered that by targeting a specific protein in the malaria parasite known as ATP4, they could affect change in the infected red blood cells. The reason for this is ATP4 has the important function of regulating the parasite's sodium balance.
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MOCAheart keeps an eye on your cardiovascular health

MOCAheart keeps an eye on your cardiovascular health | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Your heart rate, blood oxygen level and blood pressure are all key indicators of your cardiovascular state of health. It would follow, then, that if you want to stay ahead of problems in that area, monitoring those parameters would be a great help. Well, that's just what MOCAheart is designed to do.

First of all, there are indeed already heart rate-monitoring smartphone apps that utilize the phone's camera and light. According to MOCAheart's designers, however, their device is more accurate and provides a greater amount of information.
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Non-invasive MRI technique picks up early signs of Alzheimer’s disease

Non-invasive MRI technique picks up early signs of Alzheimer’s disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The development of brain plaques are thought to correlate with symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, such as memory loss. Previous research has indicated that limiting these buildups could be the key to tackling the disease, but scientists from Northwestern University are digging a little deeper. The team has devised a non-invasive MRI technique capable of tracking the specific toxins that accumulate to form plaques, potentially enabling doctors to pick up early signs of the disease before it starts to take hold.
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RegentsCareServices's curator insight, December 23, 11:48 AM

#RCS #Alzheimers #health

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Baby Thrives Once 3-D-Printed Windpipe Helps Him Breathe

Baby Thrives Once 3-D-Printed Windpipe Helps Him Breathe | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Garrett Peterson was born in 2012 with a defective windpipe. It would periodically just collapse, because the cartilage was so soft, and he'd stop breathing. This would happen every day — sometimes multiple times a day.


... Garrett was so sick in the hospital and we — we really, really thought we were going to lose him," remembers his mother, Natalie Peterson. "The doctors were telling us, you know, that there really wasn't anything more they could do."

Then the Petersons heard about some doctors at the University of Michigan who were using 3-D printers to custom-make tiny devices they call "splints" to prop open defective windpipes for babies like Garrett. The Petersons rushed their son to Ann Arbor.

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Repurposed Retroviruses | The Scientist Magazine®

Retroviral sequences in mammalian genomes are the remnants of old viral infections and, for the most part, their expression is suppressed. But a report published today (December 18) in Science suggests that, in B cells, a particular type of antigen can stimulate transcription of these viral relics, which in turn prompts cell proliferation and antibody production.
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Global life expectancy has 'increased by 6 years since 1990'

Global life expectancy has 'increased by 6 years since 1990' | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Between 1990 and 2013, global life expectancy increased by nearly 5.8 years in men and 6.6 years in women, according to a new analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 published in The Lancet.
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Clot-grabbing devices offer better outcomes for stroke patients

Reuters Health - Going into the blocked artery of someone who is having a stroke to remove the clot is more likely to produce a good recovery than treatment with just clot-busting drugs, according to a study of 500 patients in the Netherlands.

"Catching the clot and fishing it out of the blocked artery to reopen it makes a big difference in outcome," Dr. Jeffrey Saver, a director of the University of California Los Angeles Stroke Center, told Reuters Health. The devices to retrieve clots have been around for a while but until now “we hadn't had a clinical trial showing that they made patients better."
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Zinc blood test could lead to early diagnosis of breast cancer

Zinc blood test could lead to early diagnosis of breast cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Early diagnosis of breast cancer could one day be possible via a simple blood test that detects changes in zinc in the body. Scientists have taken techniques normally used for studying climate change and planetary formation and shown that changes in the isotopic composition of zinc, which is detectable in breast tissue, may help identify a "biomarker" (a measurable indicator) of early breast cancer.
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Hormone combo a triple threat to obesity and adult-onset diabetes

Hormone combo a triple threat to obesity and adult-onset diabetes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
By molecularly combining three hormones to form a new peptide, researchers have effectively cured obesity and adult-onset diabetes in rodents, with human trials of the molecule now planned.
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New ‘electronic skin’ detects pressure from different directions | KurzweilAI

New ‘electronic skin’ detects pressure from different directions | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Korean researchers have developed a stretchable “electronic skin” closely modeled on human skin. The technology could have applications in prosthetic limbs, robotics, wearable electronics, remote surgery, and biomedical devices.

Top: illustration of hexagonal microdome arrays modeled on human skin. Bottom: cross-sectional SEM images of microdome-
patterned conductive film. Scale bars: 5 μm. (Credit: American Chemical Society)

Current electronic skins are flexible, film-like devices designed to detect stress (pressure), read brain activity, monitor heart rate, or perform other functions. The new technology can also sense the direction and amount of stress, providing cues for the shape and texture of an object and how to hold it.
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New Stem Cell State | The Scientist Magazine®

New Stem Cell State | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers from Canada’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute and their international colleagues have uncovered a new type of pluripotent mouse stem cell—the “F-class” cell—through use of a somatic cell reprogramming approach. An F-class cell is able to differentiate into all three embryonic precursor tissues, yet is phenotypically and molecularly different from previously characterized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) made from somatic cells. These F-class cells proliferate more quickly than other stem cells in vitro, and are characteristically low-adhesion, giving them a fuzzy appearance. The results are published today (December 10) in Nature.
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Photoswitch therapy restores vision to blind lab animals

Photoswitch therapy restores vision to blind lab animals | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new genetic therapy that helped blind mice and dogs respond to light stimulus could restore sight to people who suffer from diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (a gradual loss of vision from periphery inwards). The therapy uses chemicals known as photoswitches, which change shape when hit with light, to open the channels that activate retinal cells. Treated mice can distinguish between steady and flashing light, while dogs with late-stage retinal degeneration also regain some sensitivity to light.

The procedure starts with an adeno-associated virus. Some retina cells in blind mice survive after disease kills the rod and cone photoreceptors, but they won't work on their own. The virus inserts a gene that instructs the cells to produce a modified version of a common glutamate receptor ion channel. Then photoswitches are attached to the newly-formed ion channels, akin to a glutamate amino acid dangling on a light-sensitive string. When light hits a photoswitch, it forces an ion channel open, thereby turning the retinal neurons on and off many times a second.
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Scientists find brain mechanism behind glucose greed

British scientists have found a brain mechanism they think may drive our desire for glucose-rich food and say the discovery could one day lead to better treatments for obesity.

In experiments using rats, researchers at Imperial College London found a mechanism that appears to sense how much glucose is reaching the brain and prompts animals to seek more if it detects a shortfall. In people, the scientists said, it may play a role in driving our preference for sweet and starchy foods.
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