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On Living Forever

On Living Forever | Longevity science | Scoop.it

“Wouldn’t you eventually get bored?” Like clockwork, the question arises when I tell someone quixotically, arrogantly, that I plan on living forever. From the limited perspective of 20 years, even the prospect of living another six or seven decades in full color can be impossible to envisage. Hedging, I answer that assuming a world where radical life extension is possible, there will be no telling as to how different the human experience will be from what we know—that is to say, where 200-year-olds won’t merely be stuck playing very, very slow mah-jongg.

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Longevity science
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Caloric restriction increases monkey lifespan, benefits health

Caloric restriction increases monkey lifespan, benefits health | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Can the lifespan of an animal be increased by restricting their intake of calories? The question has been the subject of study for decades, primarily through two concurrent long-term experiments using rhesus monkeys. Interestingly, these two studies came to conflicting conclusions, but by comparing their results and accounting for other variables, scientists have now determined that the answer is yes – caloric restriction does help monkeys stay healthier and live longer.
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Phosphoproteins in extracellular vesicles as candidate markers for breast cancer

Protein phosphorylation is a major regulatory mechanism for many cellular functions, but no phosphoprotein in biofluids has been developed for disease diagnosis because of the presence of active phosphatases. This study presents a general strategy to isolate and identify phosphoproteins in extracellular vesicles (EVs) from human plasma as potential markers to differentiate disease from healthy states. We identified close to 10,000 unique phosphopeptides in EVs from small volumes of plasma samples and more than 100 phosphoproteins in plasma EVs that are significantly higher in patients diagnosed with breast cancer as compared with healthy controls. This study demonstrates that the development of phosphoproteins in plasma EVs as disease biomarkers is highly feasible and may transform cancer screening and monitoring.
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10 Ways Technology Will Transform the Human Body in the next Decade

10 Ways Technology Will Transform the Human Body in the next Decade | Longevity science | Scoop.it

All over the world biohackers, scientists, entrepreneurs and corporations are eagerly pursuing new and marketable applications for advanced technologies. Many of them are being actively designed to help humans fulfill our age-old transcendent longings—to be stronger, smarter, better-looking and more resilient, and to cultivate new abilities that seem like superpowers by the standards of the past.

 

Here are 10 emerging devices and technologies that could soon enhance you in body and mind.

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First nanoengineered retinal implant could help the blind regain functional vision | KurzweilAI

First nanoengineered retinal implant could help the blind regain functional vision | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the first nanoengineered retinal prosthesis — a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light.

The technology could help tens of millions of people worldwide suffering from neurodegenerative diseases that affect eyesight, including macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and loss of vision due to diabetes.
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Hand-mounted exoskeleton system helps surgeons get a grip

Hand-mounted exoskeleton system helps surgeons get a grip | Longevity science | Scoop.it
While many modern robotic inventions seem more like moonshot projects than practical ones, in the medical field, robots have been helping doctors perform surgery for over a decade. In most cases though, surgeons control the movement of the robot through joysticks, knobs, dials and other peripherals. A new exoskeleton being developed at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, however, turns a doctor's hands into the controls.

Surgeons would slide the exoskeleton over their hands like a glove. At the other end of the device, a new surgical gripper would not only move according to the doctors' hand gestures, but it would be equipped with haptic feedback
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Modified corn fights fungus with "Trojan horse" RNA

Modified corn fights fungus with "Trojan horse" RNA | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The Aspergillus family of fungi is a dangerous food contaminant, thanks to its tendency to produce aflatoxins. These carcinogenic compounds have been linked to stunted growth in children, liver cancer, and immune suppression, which in turn increases a person's vulnerability to conditions like HIV. Now, researchers at the University of Arizona have genetically modified corn plants to fight back, by letting them send "Trojan horse" molecules into the fungus to neutralize its ability to produce the toxins.
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Google AI detects breast cancer better than pathologists - Pharmaphorum

Google AI detects breast cancer better than pathologists - Pharmaphorum | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Google has successfully applied deep learning artificial intelligence algorithms to the diagnosis of breast cancer.

In a study carried out by researchers taking part in Google’s Brain Residency Program – a 12-month educational course in machine and deep learning – an algorithm was trained to detect breast cancer tumours in a dataset of digitised pathology slides provided by Dutch medical institute the Radboud University Medical Center.

After ‘training’ the algorithm, researchers were able to achieve a 92% sensitivity in picking out tumour cells from the slides – significantly higher than the 73% achieved by trained pathologists with no time constraint.
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A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of resveratrol for Alzheimer disease. - PubMed - NCBI

CONCLUSIONS:

Resveratrol was safe and well-tolerated. Resveratrol and its major metabolites penetrated the blood-brain barrier to have CNS effects. Further studies are required to interpret the biomarker changes associated with resveratrol treatment.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE:

This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with AD resveratrol is safe, well-tolerated, and alters some AD biomarker trajectories. The study is rated Class II because more than 2 primary outcomes were designated.

 

[Dementia and Alzheimer's lead to a decrease or imbalance in amyloid-beta40 (Aβ40) levels. The study showed that resveratrol supplementation helps stabilize circulating Aβ40 levels in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid.]

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New appetite-suppressing mechanism discovered - in your bones

New appetite-suppressing mechanism discovered - in your bones | Longevity science | Scoop.it
There has been plenty of recent research focusing on how your gut bacteria can send messages to your brain controlling appetite and feelings of satiation, but a recent discovery by researchers from the Columbia University Medical Centre has revealed a previously unknown appetite-regulating mechanism that is secreted by bone cells.

The CUMC team has been researching the function of bones for many years and back in 2007 made a major discovery. They revealed that our skeletons function as an endocrine organ with bone cells releasing hormones that are known to be crucial in regulating energy metabolism.
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4 Ways Scientists Hope Nanobots Will Make You Healthier

4 Ways Scientists Hope Nanobots Will Make You Healthier | Longevity science | Scoop.it
some of the most exciting progress in medical robotics is actually taking place at the micro and nano-scales. A recent review study in the journal Science Robotics highlights that materials and biomedical science have started to come together to create a new breed of miniature robots able to deliver drugs, carry out precision surgery and dramatically improve diagnostics.
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Key Regulator of Intestinal Homeostasis Identified | The Scientist Magazine®

Key Regulator of Intestinal Homeostasis Identified | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers are only beginning to understand the roles of the hundreds of proteins involved in reading, writing, and erasing the epigenome. One of the epigenetic regulators, SP140, which is mutated in a number autoimmune disorders, including Crohn’s disease and multiple sclerosis, is also essential to macrophage function and intestinal homeostasis in both humans and mice, scientists reported today (March 3) in Science Immunology.

“Many immune-mediated disorders are driven by a combination of genetic susceptibility as well as environmental influences [so] epigenetics is a suitable critical juncture between those two aspects of the disease,” said coauthor Kate Jeffrey, a researcher investigating the epigenetic control of innate immunity at Massachusetts General Hospital.
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How E. coli switches from "attack" mode to "colonize" mode

How E. coli switches from "attack" mode to "colonize" mode | Longevity science | Scoop.it
There's a delicate ecosystem thriving in your gut right now, but all it takes is a bad burrito to throw it off-kilter. Just how pathogens like E. coli take hold and trash the place isn't well understood, but now researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have studied how the bacteria senses its surroundings and in response, switches its gene expression from "attack mode" to "colonize mode."
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Patient-specific hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells model pazopanib-mediated hepatotoxicity

Patient-specific hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells model pazopanib-mediated hepatotoxicity | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Our study establishes the first patient-specific HLC-based platform for idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity testing, incorporating multiple potential causative factors and permitting the correlation of transcriptomic and cellular responses to clinical phenotypes. Establishment of patient-specific HLCs with clinical phenotypes representing population variations will be valuable for pharmaceutical drug testing.
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DNA-repairing drug could fight aging and radiation damage

DNA-repairing drug could fight aging and radiation damage | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at Harvard Medical School and the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have uncovered one of the key mechanisms that gradually weakens our body's ability to repair DNA, and tests were able to restore the cell function of old mice to that of their younger counterparts. The team says an anti-aging drug could be developed in the next few years, and the treatment also shows promise in reversing DNA damage caused by radiation exposure – good news for cancer battlers or space travelers.

This new study builds on previous work from the Harvard-UNSW team that explores the role that a molecule called NAD plays in the body. Back in 2011, treating diabetic mice with the compound NMN (which produces NAD) was found to restore the animals' blood sugar metabolism to near-normal levels, and later, the scientists used the compound to fight aging by fixing the chemical communication going on inside cells.
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Unexpected new lung function discovered: Making blood

Unexpected new lung function discovered: Making blood | Longevity science | Scoop.it
"To our knowledge this is the first description of blood progenitors resident in the lung, and it raises a lot of questions with clinical relevance for the millions of people who suffer from thrombocytopenia," says Looney. "We're seeing more and more that the stem cells that produce the blood don't just live in one place but travel around through the blood stream. Perhaps 'studying abroad' in different organs is a normal part of stem cell education."

The findings should help inform new studies into treatments for diseases that affect platelet production, and provides a better understanding of the active role stem cells play in the body. Future research could apply the discovery to the human body, and look into how the lungs and bone marrow work together to produce blood.
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Gene-silencing drug halves cholesterol levels with a single jab

Gene-silencing drug halves cholesterol levels with a single jab | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new gene-silencing drug that can lower cholesterol levels is proving promising in initial clinical test results. The treatment was shown to reduce the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in patients' blood by up to 51 percent in the month following one single treatment. The drug, named Inclisiran, utilizes a technique called RNA interference therapy which targets, and switches off, a specific gene known to be responsible for elevated LDL levels.
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Lab-grown chicken on the menu for the first time

Lab-grown chicken on the menu for the first time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
If you find yourself torn between cravings and ethical concerns every time you tuck into a chicken nugget, there might soon be a way you can have your meat and eat it too. Memphis Meats has just served up chicken and duck meat cultivated in a lab from poultry cells, meaning no animals were harmed in the making of the meal.
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New Artificial Synapse Bridges the Gap to Brain-Like Computers

New Artificial Synapse Bridges the Gap to Brain-Like Computers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
From AlphaGo’s historic victory against world champion Lee Sedol to DeepStack’s sweeping win against professional poker players, artificial intelligence is clearly on a roll.

Part of the momentum comes from breakthroughs in artificial neural networks, which loosely mimic the multi-layer structure of the human brain. But that’s where the similarity ends. While the brain can hum along on energy only enough to power a light bulb, AlphaGo’s neural network runs on a whopping 1,920 CPUs and 280 GPUs, with a total power consumption of roughly one million watts—50,000 times more than its biological counterpart.
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Neanderthals 'self-medicated' for pain - BBC News

Neanderthals 'self-medicated' for pain - BBC News | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It appears the Neanderthals had a good knowledge of medicinal plants and how these might relieve the pain of toothache or stomach ache. They might also have used antibiotics, long before the medicines were developed in modern times.

"The use of antibiotics would be very surprising, as this is more than 40,000 years before we developed penicillin," said Prof Cooper.

"Certainly our findings contrast markedly with the rather simplistic view of our ancient relatives in popular imagination."
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A biocompatible stretchable material for brain implants and ‘electronic skin’ | KurzweilAI

A biocompatible stretchable material for brain implants and ‘electronic skin’ | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Stanford chemical engineers have developed a soft, flexible plastic electrode that stretches like rubber but carries electricity like wires — ideal for brain interfaces and other implantable electronics, they report in an open-access March 10 paper in Science Advances.

Developed by Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering, and his team, the material is still a laboratory prototype, but the team hopes to develop it as part of their long-term focus on creating flexible materials that interface with the human body.

Flexible interface

“One thing about the human brain that a lot of people don’t know is that it changes volume throughout the day,” says postdoctoral research fellow Yue Wang,
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Low-gluten diets linked to increased risk of diabetes

Low-gluten diets linked to increased risk of diabetes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new study released by the American Heart Foundation points to a possible relationship between low-gluten diets and a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes.

A Consumer Reports National Research Centre survey from 2014 revealed that up to a third of American adults polled were trying to cut gluten out of their diets. Yet the prevalence of celiac disease in the United States has been relatively stable at about 1 percent of the population. So many people seem to believe that reducing or eliminating gluten from their diet is an inherently healthy act, but is there actually any science to back up that belief?
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Caffeine among compounds that could combat dementia

Caffeine among compounds that could combat dementia | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new study by Indiana University researchers has revealed how several compounds, including caffeine, help boost the production of an enzyme that has been shown to protect the brain against several degenerative neurological disorders.

In previous research, the team discovered that an enzyme known as NMNAT2 was shown to reduce the cognitive defects associated with dementia and other degenerative brain diseases. The enzyme does this by combatting tau, which are misfolded proteins that can build up as plaques in the brain as we age and have been linked to numerous neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases and ALS (aka Lou Gehrig's disease). The enzyme also protects neurons from stress.
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Orlando V. Gonzalez MD's curator insight, March 17, 11:28 AM

At LIFE*MOD we pride ourselves in being a bit unconventional when it comes to telling people how to live longer healthier.  This is yet another example of how most people get information from the media and it usually isn't correct.  There are so many things that people do that they think are healthy.  

Most people don't know that there are foods/drinks that the media has told us are bad for us.  However, let us look at the science behind these claims.  

 

The more you know...

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Master genes trigger cascade of damage to other genes after brain trauma

Master genes trigger cascade of damage to other genes after brain trauma | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It wasn't that long ago that sportspeople were expected to simply shake off blows to the head and keep on playing, but evidence continues to mount regarding the seriousness and potential long-term risks of such injuries. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have now identified a series of master genes that, when damaged through traumatic brain injury, can adversely trigger changes in other genes related to the onset of many neurological and psychiatric disorders.
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Fiber optic probe beats a biopsy for measuring muscle health

Fiber optic probe beats a biopsy for measuring muscle health | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Diagnosing a muscular disorder, disease or infection often requires a sample of the tissue to be extracted, but these biopsies can be painful and difficult to perform. Researchers at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) have developed a less invasive alternative that uses a thin fiber optic probe to quickly scan and measure the health of muscle tissue. For the first time, the team has now tested the system on living muscles.

Sarcomeres are the bundles of filaments that make up muscle fibers, and are the main component that allows muscles to expand and contract. Measuring the length of sarcomeres, and how they move, is currently one of the most accurate methods for diagnosing muscle impairment, but it's a fiddly and invasive process.
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Killing cancer by clogging its garbage disposal system

Killing cancer by clogging its garbage disposal system | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Beating cancer in all its forms isn't likely to come from a single "eureka!" moment, but numerous little advances and new techniques that add up to better treatments. Whether we zap tumors, starve them out or develop treatments from sources like sea snail eggs or artificial sweeteners, cancer could succumb to death by a million cuts. The newest little cut could come from interrupting the natural waste disposal system of cells, causing defective proteins to build up and choke the cancer cells out.
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New method measures cellular stiffness to predict cancer risk

New method measures cellular stiffness to predict cancer risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it
One of cancer's many effects on the body is the stiffening of cells, a process that leads tumors to having a dense, thick composition. While detecting this phenomenon early could help lead to better treatment options for cancer victims, thus far, doing so on a cell-by-cell basis hasn't been possible. By using two lasers and a camera, researchers at Duke University have now changed that.

The researchers determined that when a cell stiffens, its internal contents become more regularly organized. Therefore, detecting organization in a cell would lead to an understanding of its stiffness, which would help uncover the formation of cancerous tissue. While one of the study's authors, biomechanical engineering professor Adam Wax, says more research is needed to link intracellular organization to stiffness, he does have a theory.
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