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Better approach to treating deadly melanoma identified

Scientists have identified a protein that appears to hold the key to creating more effective drug treatments for melanoma, one of the deadliest cancers.
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Longevity science
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Wireless electronic implants deliver antibiotic, then harmlessly dissolve | KurzweilAI

Wireless electronic implants deliver antibiotic, then harmlessly dissolve | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Optical (and corresponding IR) images of the dissolution of implant device (top row: powering induction coil with resistor/heater) (credit: Tufts
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Robotic walker helps patients regain natural gait and increases productivity of physiotherapists | KurzweilAI

Robotic walker helps patients regain natural gait and increases productivity of physiotherapists | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Robotic walker (credit: NUS) A novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait has been
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First genetic-based tool to detect circulating cancer cells in blood — lights up cancer cells | KurzweilAI

First genetic-based tool to detect circulating cancer cells in blood — lights up cancer cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
NanoFlares light up (red clouds) individual cells if a cancer (in this study, breast cancer) biomarker (messenger RNA, blue) is detected by recognition DNA
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Software could boost arthritis research and treatment, by outlining bones in x-rays

Software could boost arthritis research and treatment, by outlining bones in x-rays | Longevity science | Scoop.it
X-rays don't always show bones as being sharply defined from the surrounding tissue. Now, however, free software known as BoneFinder is able to draw outline...
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Whole-genome sequences of 17 of the world’s oldest living people published | KurzweilAI

Whole-genome sequences of 17 of the world’s oldest living people published | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Using 17 genomes, researchers were unable to find rare protein-altering variants significantly associated with extreme longevity, according to a study published November 12, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hinco Gierman from Stanford University and colleagues.

Supercentenarians are the world’s oldest people, living beyond 110 years of age. Seventy-four are alive worldwide; 22 live in the U.S. The authors of this study performed whole-genome sequencing on 17 supercentenarians to explore the genetic basis underlying extreme human longevity.
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Michele Lally's curator insight, November 18, 1:00 AM

My own grandma ~ maiden name, Pauline Cynthia Wagner, passed away this year at 103 years, 8 months and circa 13 days old.  She seemed &looked 10 years younger until her last two weeks.

 

 

 

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Mind-Controlled Gene Expression | The Scientist Magazine®

Mind-Controlled Gene Expression | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Thoughts have power—sort of. A new device uses the electric energy of a person’s brainwaves to trigger a light-emitting diode, which then remotely activates light-inducible genes in a small implant placed in mice.

The system, described in Nature Communications today (November 11), may eventually provide new gene and cell-based treatment opportunities that respond to an individual’s specific mental states.
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Targeting a single molecule may stop prostate cancer in its tracks

Targeting a single molecule may stop prostate cancer in its tracks | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In the spread of prostate cancer, the SRPK1 molecule is critical. It enables a tumor to generate new blood vessels and begin to grow. Research conducted at ...
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Prototype device diagnoses prostate cancer in minutes

Prototype device diagnoses prostate cancer in minutes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
European research organization Fraunhofer has developed a prototype device that its creators claim can reliably determine whether changed tissue in the pros...
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Gut Microbiome Heritability | The Scientist Magazine®

Gut Microbiome Heritability | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Previous research suggested host genetic variation can influence microbial phenotype, but an analysis of data from a large twin study published in Cell (November 6) solidifies the connection between human genotype and the composition of the gut microbiome.


Studying more than 1,000 fecal samples from 416 monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs, Cornell University’s Ruth Ley and her colleagues have homed in on one bacterial taxon, the family Christensenellaceae, as the most highly heritable group of microbes in the human gut.


They determined that introducing at least one member this bacterial family was associated with reduced weight gain in mice.

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Researchers develop new B12 testing kit

Researchers develop new B12 testing kit | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Vitamin B12 is vital to keep a nervous system healthy. Since it is found mainly in meat and dairy, it is common for people to associate B12 deficiency with vegans, who are aware of this issue (in Germany there's even a B12-enriched toothpaste) and often take measures to supplement. In fact, it is the general population of developing countries who are more likely to lack B12, and it is primarily for them that a team of Canadian researchers has developed a simple, cheap B12 test kit.

Yvonne Lamers, a professor in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia, and her team tried their new method on 94 healthy young women in Vancouver. A finger prick is all it takes to collect a sample of blood for the analysis.
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Prehistoric DNA: 45,000-Year-Old Modern Human Genome the Oldest Yet Sequenced

Prehistoric DNA: 45,000-Year-Old Modern Human Genome the Oldest Yet Sequenced | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An international consortium of scientists report sequencing the full genome of a man who lived 45,000 years ago. The DNA was isolated from a thighbone found in 2008 in a Siberian town called Ust’-Ishim. Published in Nature, the study beats the previous record—from a boy who lived 24,000 years ago—for the oldest known modern human genome sequenced.

Besides demonstrating the continually growing prowess of sequencing technology, this study revealed new characteristics of early humans and how they compare to modern humans from Eurasia. For example, by noting the differences in the sequence of the genome, the scientists were able to calculate that one to two new mutations occurred each year over the past 45,000 years.
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Could liposomes be the answer to our antibiotic crisis?

Could liposomes be the answer to our antibiotic crisis? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The WHO says we are headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again ki...
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Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Could Artificial Sweeteners Raise Your Blood Sugar? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Research done on mice and humans, suggests that artificial sweeteners could raise your blood sugar levels more than if you indulged in sugar-sweetened sodas and desserts.

Blame it on the bugs in your gut, scientists say. They found that saccharin (a.k.a. Sweet‘N Low), sucralose (a.k.a. Splenda) and aspartame (a.k.a. NutraSweet and Equal) raised blood sugar levels by dramatically changing the makeup of the gut microorganisms, mainly bacteria, that are in the intestines and help with nutrition and the immune system.

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Platelet-like nanoparticles improve on nature to stem the blood flow

Platelet-like nanoparticles improve on nature to stem the blood flow | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The skin is the body's first line of defense against infection. And when this barrier is broken, or an internal organ is ruptured, it is the process of coagulation, or clotting, which relies largely on blood cells called platelets, that seals the breach and stems the flow of blood. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB) have now synthesized nanoparticles that mimic the form and function of platelets, but can do more than just accelerate the body's natural healing processes.

Platelets are nucleus-free blood cells that are essentially the building blocks for any blood clot, binding together at the edge of a wound as well as changing shape and secreting chemical messengers to call more platelets to the scene of the injury to assist in the healing process. However, coagulation can be hampered if an injury is too severe, or if the injured person is taking anti-coagulation medication or suffers from a platelet disorder.
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Organovo now selling tiny 3D-printed human livers

Organovo now selling tiny 3D-printed human livers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When a medication enters the bloodstream, it ends up being concentrated in the liver – after all, one of the organ's main functions is to cleanse the blood. This means that if a drug is going to have an adverse effect on any part of the body, chances are it will be the liver. It would seem to follow, therefore, that if a pharmaceutical company wanted to test the safety of its products, it would be nice to have some miniature human livers on which to experiment – which is just what San Diego-based biotech firm Organovo is about to start selling.

Known as exVive3D, the three-dimensional liver models measure just a few millimeters across, and are created using a 3D bioprinter. The device incorporates two print heads, one of which deposits a support matrix, and the other of which precisely places human liver cells in it.
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Neuroprosthetics | The Scientist Magazine®

Neuroprosthetics | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Neuroprosthetic research began long before it solidified as an organized academic field of study. In 1973, University of California, Los Angeles, computer scientist Jacques Vidal observed modulations of signals in the electroencephalogram of a patient and wrote in Annual Review of Biophysics and Bioengineering: “Can these observable electrical brain signals be put to work as carriers of information in man-computer communication or for the purpose of controlling such external apparatus as prosthetic devices or spaceships?”1 While we don’t yet have mind-controlled spaceships, neural control of a prosthetic device for medical applications is now becoming commonplace in labs around the world.
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An artificial retina based on semiconductor nanorods and carbon nanotubes | KurzweilAI

An artificial retina based on semiconductor nanorods and carbon nanotubes | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An international team of researchers has combined semiconductor nanorods and carbon nanotubes to create a wireless, light-sensitive, flexible film that could potentially act in the place of a damaged retina.

When they tested it with a chick retina that normally doesn’t respond to light, they found that the film absorbed light, sparking neuronal activity.

Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), for example, could potentially benefit from such a device, the researchers from Tel Aviv University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Centers for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Newcastle University say. AMD usually affects people age 60 or older who have damage to a specific part of the retina, limiting their vision.
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X Challenge winner diagnoses diseases in minutes from a single drop of blood

X Challenge winner diagnoses diseases in minutes from a single drop of blood | Longevity science | Scoop.it
For the last two years, the US$2.25 million Nokia Sensing X Challenge has lured entrants from around the globe to submit groundbreaking technologies that improve access to health care. A panel of experts have awarded this year's grand prize to Massachusetts-based DNA Medical Institute (DMI), whose hand-held device is capable of diagnosing ailments in minutes, using only a single drop of blood.

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The rHealth diagnostic system requires the patient to provide just a single drop of blood, with this small sample mixed with nanoscale test strips and streamed past lasers to process its signature. This can then identify ailments ranging from simple colds, to the flu, to more serious diseases like Ebola, with claimed gold standard accuracy. It comes accompanied by a wearable patch which is worn to monitor vital signs, such as breathing and heart rate, sharing data over Bluetooth with either the device or the user's smartphone.

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Dr. Kunal Shah's comment, November 13, 12:11 AM
wow very nice - its a gadget?
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Google Offers Genome Storage, Analysis | The Scientist Magazine®

Google Offers Genome Storage, Analysis | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
For about $25 a year, Google will store a human genome sequence in its Google Genomics cloud platform, which was designed to provide researcher a way to keep, share, and analyze genomic data. “We saw biologists moving from studying one genome at a time to studying millions,” David Glazer, the Google software engineer who led the effort, told MIT Technology Review. “The opportunity is how to apply breakthroughs in data technology to help with this transition.”

Earlier this year, Google announced that it had joined the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a big consortium of research organizations, to host public genomic data on its cloud platform. Already, 3,500 genomes have been uploaded to Google’s servers, according to the Review.
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Circular Chromosomes Straightened | The Scientist Magazine®

Circular Chromosomes Straightened | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Synthetic biologists often work with circular chromosomes to engineer genetic material because they’re stable and easy to manipulate, but they don’t resemble the natural shape of chromosomes in eukaryotes. Reporting in PNAS this week (November 5), Jef Boeke of NYU Langone Medical Center and postdoc Leslie Mitchell designed a tool, which they dubbed the telomerator, that straightens circular yeast chromosomes and adds telomeres to either end.

“To convert circular DNA to something more akin to a natural chromosome is appealing,” said Timothy Lu, a synthetic biologist at MIT who was not involved in the study. Lu said the telomerator could help advance a number of goals, from designing artificial chromosomes that encode complex pathways to testing the significance of telomere location in the genome. “It’s really a platform technology for downstream applications.”
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Human clinical trials to begin on drug that reverses diabetes in animal models

Human clinical trials to begin on drug that reverses diabetes in animal models | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) has shown that verapamil, a drug widely used to treat high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat and migraine headaches, is able to completely reverse diabetes in animal models. The UAB team will now move onto clinical trials to see if the same results are repeated in humans.

Following years of research, the UAB researchers have shown that high blood sugar causes the body to overproduce a protein called TXNIP. Too much of this protein in specialized cells in the pancreas called beta cells contributes to the progression of diabetes by leading to the death of the cells and countering the body's efforts to produce insulin.
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Low-cost 3D-printed prosthetic hand to be tested on amputees in Ecuador

Low-cost 3D-printed prosthetic hand to be tested on amputees in Ecuador | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A PhD candidate and six undergraduate students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UCIC) have created a low-cost, programmable, 3D-printed prosthetic hand that may soon change the lives of amputees in Ecuador. The hand costs just US$270 to manufacture, making it a small fraction of the cost of a typical prosthetic of this type.

The electromyographic (EMG) prosthetic hand uses a machine-learning algorithm and pattern recognition to add to its functionality, extending it beyond mere open and close actions. An initial training period of one or two minutes takes patients through each of five mathematically-modeled gestures: a hand at rest, open-faced, closed, doing a three-finger grasp, and doing a fine pinch. Then the machine-learning kicks in such that the microcontroller in the prosthetic can figure out which grip the patient is trying to make and replicate it.
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High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice | KurzweilAI

High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Kerala coconuts (credit: Dan Iserman CC) A new Danish-led research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if they are placed on a
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Memo Box, the smart pillbox that reminds you to take your medication

Memo Box, the smart pillbox that reminds you to take your medication | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Memo Box is a device designed to replace the familiar plastic seven-day pill boxes that works in conjunction with a smartphone app to ensure you and your loved ones take prescribed medication at the right time, and in the right dose.
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Study Finds U.S. Diets Still Contain Too Many Bad Fats

Study Finds U.S. Diets Still Contain Too Many Bad Fats | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Americans need fewer trans and saturated fats, and more omega-3 fatty acids.


Research published in October indicates that Americans have reduced their intake of saturated and trans fats, but not enough. At the same time, omega-3 consumption remains steady but very low.

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