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Probiotics' Benefits May Be More Than a Gut Feeling

Probiotics' Benefits May Be More Than a Gut Feeling | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Probiotics, believed to help with digestion, are increasingly being studied to treat wide-ranging conditions, from colic to cholesterol and the common cold.

 

One of the fastest-growing dietary supplements, probiotics are now prominent on drug and big-box store shelves. They are live microorganisms—or "good" bacteria—that when consumed in capsules or yogurt are said to confer a health benefit.

 

 

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MIT scientists discover size of implant can affect immune system rejection

MIT scientists discover size of implant can affect immune system rejection | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered that creating body implants at a certain size maximizes the amount of time they can spend operational in the body before being neutralized by the immune system. The research could do away with the need for painful and repeated injections.
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Watch Surgical Robot Deftly Suture a Grape

Watch Surgical Robot Deftly Suture a Grape | Longevity science | Scoop.it
We've covered Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci surgical robot for years. In fact, to some, the system's long history—1.5 million surgeries dating
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Type of B vitamin shown to reduce risk of common skin cancers

A simple daily vitamin may help prevent the most common types of skin cancer in people at high risk of the disease, according to new research from Australia.

A study conducted at the University of Sydney found that nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, reduced by 23 percent the incidence of new, non-melanoma skin cancers in people who had at least two of the cancers in the previous five years. The study compared nicotinamide taken as a pill twice daily to a placebo.
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Electronic memory may bring bionic brain one step closer

Electronic memory may bring bionic brain one step closer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers claim to have constructed the world's first electronic memory cell that effectively mimics the analog process of human memory and may one day lead to the creation of the first bionic brain.
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How DNA sequencing is transforming the hunt for new drugs

How DNA sequencing is transforming the hunt for new drugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Drug manufacturers have begun amassing enormous troves of human DNA in hopes of significantly shortening the time it takes to identify new drug candidates, a move some say is transforming the development of medicines.

The efforts will help researchers identify rare genetic mutations by scanning large databases of volunteers who agree to have their DNA sequenced and to provide access to detailed medical records.
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Scientists breed beef rich in the beneficial fatty acids associated with fish oils

Scientists breed beef rich in the beneficial fatty acids associated with fish oils | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Chinese scientists have reared beef rich in the beneficial fatty acids associated with fish oils. The study in Springer's journal Biotechnology Letters also highlights the scientific challenges that remain.
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Penn Study: Omega-3 Could Reduce Antisocial And Aggressive Behavior In Kids

Penn Study: Omega-3 Could Reduce Antisocial And Aggressive Behavior In Kids | Longevity science | Scoop.it
According to a new study, omega-3, a fatty acid that’s commonly found in fish oil, could help reduce behavior problems in kids who tend to be aggressive and anti-social.
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Optogenetic therapy shows promise for reversing acquired blindness

Optogenetic therapy shows promise for reversing acquired blindness | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Across the world many millions of people suffer from inherited conditions that progressively degenerate the light-sensing cells in their eyes, and eventually send them blind. Recently, however, researchers from the University of Bern and the University of Gottingen have developed a way to possibly reverse this damage by using a newly-developed, light-sensitive protein embedded into other cells in the retina to restore vision.

Retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy are all conditions that progressively, but effectively, destroy light-sensing cells in the eye. Past treatments have attempted to reduce or stop these diseases before they progressed to full blindness using pharmaceutical methods, gene replacement therapy, or both. The results, however, have been mixed, as the treatments do little to actually fully restore sight due to a lack of low-level light sensitivity and physiological rejection.
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Smarter, cheaper technologies for improved point-of-care medicine in remote areas | KurzweilAI

Smarter, cheaper technologies for improved point-of-care medicine in remote areas | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have developed new paper and flexible polymer substrates with special sensing devices for rapid and accurate detection of pathogens such as HIV, various bacteria, and CD4+ T lymphocytes.

These novel technologies offer the type of robust, simple, and inexpensive biosensing systems required to provide point-of-care health care in remote areas, where there is minimal diagnostic infrastructure or equipment and a lack of trained medical technicians.
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Loading cancer vaccines into silicon microparticles could stop tumors in their tracks

Loading cancer vaccines into silicon microparticles could stop tumors in their tracks | Longevity science | Scoop.it
We could completely inhibit tumor growth after just one dose of the cancer vaccine in the animal model," says principal investigator Haifa Shen of the Houston Methodist Research institute. "This is the most amazing result we have ever seen in a tumor treatment study.
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New Stem Cell Identified | The Scientist Magazine®

New Stem Cell Identified | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have isolated and defined a new type of pluripotent cell from early mouse embryos and from monkey and human stem cell lines. The monkey- and human-derived versions of these pluripotent cells can divide and generate the three germ layers in a developing mouse embryo, providing the first demonstration that human pluripotent cells can begin a differentiation program inside mice.


In their May 6 Nature paper reporting these results, developmental biologist Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, and his colleagues suggested that these newly identified cells may be useful for modeling early human development and might in the future be used to generate tissues and organs for clinical applications.

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Scientists discover key driver of human aging | KurzweilAI

Scientists discover key driver of human aging | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A study tying the aging process to the deterioration of tightly packaged bundles of cellular DNA could lead to methods of preventing and treating age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease, scientists at the Salk Institute and the Chinese Academy of Science note in a paper published Thursday, April 30 in the journal Science.

They found that the genetic mutations underlying Werner syndrome, a disorder that leads to premature aging and death, resulted in the deterioration of bundles of DNA ...

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What people who live longest eat

In the early years of this century, demographers studying populations with unusually long life spans mapped out places where longevity correlated with certain lifestyles, marking those areas in blue.

Dan Buettner, a National Geographic fellow, has been studying these “blue zones” for more than a decade, talking to centenarians, studying their genetics, examining their diets and habits, and writing several books.
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Meditation and yoga may ease diseases that cause gut pain

If you thought meditation was good only for your emotional well-being, think again: A new study suggests it may also alleviate the symptoms of two gut disorders.


The study looked at people who had either irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or irritable bowel disease (IBD). It found that those who did yoga and meditation regularly for two months had fewer symptoms associated with the two gut disorders.



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Restoring sensations in prosthetic hands | KurzweilAI

Restoring sensations in prosthetic hands | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of engineers and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a device to restore sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetic devices, allowing people to feel touch, and hot and cold through their prosthetic hands.

If it works, upper-limb amputees who use motorized prosthetic devices would be able to feel various sensations through the prosthetic by stimulating the nerves in the upper arm and forearm, which would send sensory signals to the brain.
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New device allows for skin biopsies in under five minutes without anesthetic

New device allows for skin biopsies in under five minutes without anesthetic | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A team of Spanish researchers has created a new device that significantly cuts down the time required to perform a skin biopsy. The new method doesn't require any specialized skills, and could open the door to faster skin cancer diagnoses.
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Men who exercise may delay age-related high cholesterol

Men who exercise may delay age-related high cholesterol | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Men who get plenty of aerobic exercise may delay the onset of age-related high cholesterol, potentially lowering their risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers followed thousands of men over several decades, periodically drawing blood to test their cholesterol and then making them run on treadmills to measure their cardiorespiratory fitness. Men who could run longer and faster – signs that their bodies more easily deliver oxygen to muscles – also had lower cholesterol.
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Mediterranean Diet Boosts Brain Power, Clinical Study Finds

Mediterranean Diet Boosts Brain Power, Clinical Study Finds | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The popular Mediterranean diet, supplemented with olive oil or nuts, helped stave off cognitive decline in a scientifically rigorous study.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Great to see a serious scientific study on diet.

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Microbiome Fingerprints | The Scientist Magazine®

Microbiome Fingerprints | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
“Each of us personally has a specific set of bugs that are an extension of us, just the same way that our own genome is a part of what defines us,”
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Organic ion transistor blocks pain signals from reaching the brain

Organic ion transistor blocks pain signals from reaching the brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new type of medical device could one day put the minds of chronic pain sufferers at ease by distributing the body's own natural pain relief signals at just the right time. Developed at Linköping University in Sweden, the tiny "ion pump" is made from organic electronics and could be implanted in patients, serving to cut off pain signals in the spinal chord before they make their way to the brain.

Similar to the way a pacemaker delivers electric pulses to correct an abnormal heartbeat, the ion pump would send out neurotransmitters to prevent pain signals reaching the brain. The difference is that instead of using electrodes to send pure electrical signals, the device is built with biologically compatible materials and sends chemical signals that better integrate with our internal systems – like a kind of chemical transistor.
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New technique allows for production of drug-delivering silicone microspheres

New technique allows for production of drug-delivering silicone microspheres | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists are increasingly looking at using medication-filled microspheres for targeted drug delivery within the human body. Silicone would be a particularly good building material for such spheres, as it's biocompatible, waterproof, and chemically stable. Unfortunately, using traditional methods, it can't be made into small enough spheres. Now, however, a new process has allowed for the creation of silicone microspheres that are about one one-hundredth the size of any previously produced.

Ordinarily, microspheres are made by suspending minuscule droplets of one type of liquid within another type, and then applying heat to cause the droplets to polymerize into solid spheres. When that approach is attempted with silicone, however, the droplets will coalesce with one another when heated – the result is a few larger spheres instead of a bunch of tiny ones.
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Exploring the Impacts of Genetic Variation on Tissue-Specific Expression | The Scientist Magazine®

Exploring the Impacts of Genetic Variation on Tissue-Specific Expression | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
By analyzing more than 1,600 samples representing 43 different tissues from 175 individuals, members of the international Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Consortium found that unique and shared regulatory DNA variants create similar gene-expression patterns within tissues across individuals, according to a study and two companion papers published today (May 7) in Science.

“It’s a very impressive set of analyses where they are correlating mutations and haplotypes with gene expression in a way that I haven’t really seen before,” said Mathias Uhlén of the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. “It’s a landmark paper for sure.”
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Scientists identify novel drug mechanism that fights brain cancer

Scientists identify novel drug mechanism that fights brain cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed and tested a molecule that has the ability to disrupt the body's regulation of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct rather than multiply. The method was found to be effective when tackling dormant brain cancer cells that existing treatments are ineffective at eradicating.

The study focused on a UC Davis-developed molecule known as UCD38B, looking at its effects on human glioma cells, which are responsible for an aggressive form of brain cancer. The targeted cells are produced by glial cells in the brain, which themselves provide structural protection to neurons.
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3D-printed attachment turns any smartphone into a DNA-scanning microscope

3D-printed attachment turns any smartphone into a DNA-scanning microscope | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have built a cheap 3D-printed attachment able to turn smartphones into sophisticated microscopes. Armed with the new device, a smartphone would be able to detect single DNA strands and analyze them to diagnose diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s without bulky and expensive equipment.

Cheap and portable medical diagnostics could make a real difference in assisting patients in third-world countries or remote areas, and microscopes are an important part of the arsenal. In the past, we've seen several attachments that can turn phones into microscopes for a measly price.
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Functioning synthetic blood vessels become the real thing

Functioning synthetic blood vessels become the real thing | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When a vein or artery gets seriously blocked, a common course of action involves replacing it with part of another blood vessel harvested from elsewhere in the patient's body. While 3D-printed and lab-grown blood vessels show promise as alternatives, scientists from the Vienna University of Technology and Vienna Medical University have developed another option – polymer fabric vessels that transform into biological ones, once implanted.

The artificial blood vessels are made from biocompatible and biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethanes.
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