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Nose cell transplants allow paralyzed dogs to walk again

Nose cell transplants allow paralyzed dogs to walk again | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from the University of Cambridge’s Veterinary School, working with colleagues from the UK Medical Research Council’s Regenerative Medicine Centre, have got disabled dogs walking again.

 

More specifically, they’ve used the dogs’ own cells to repair their spinal cord injuries, and at least partially restored the functionality of their back legs. The researchers believe that the process shows promise for use on physically challenged humans.

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Aprecia to 3D Print Medicines - 3D Printing Industry

According to in-PharmaTechnologist.com, Aprecia will invest $25 million in the facility to take on 150 new employees for the production of its ZipDose products. Though the drug has not yet been approved by the FDA, it was submitted for approval in October of last year and the company hopes to obtain approval soon. ZipDose is meant to deliver the active chemicals in a drug more quickly than other over-the-counter “fast melt” pills and, according to the company, the manufacturing of ZipDose relies heavily on 3D printing.



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12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine - 3D Printing Industry

12 Things We Can 3D Print in Medicine - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Kaiba Gionfriddo was born prematurely in 2011. After 8 months, his lung development caused concerns, although he was sent home with his parents as his breathing was normal. Six weeks later, Kaiba stopped breathing and turned blue. He was diagnosed with tracheobronchomalacia, a long Latin word that means his that windpipe was so weak that it collapsed. He had a tracheostomy and was put on a ventilator – the conventional treatment. Still, Kaiba would stop breathing almost daily. His heart would stop, too. Then, his caregivers 3D printed a bioresorbable device that instantly helped Kaiba breathe. This case is considered a prime example of how customized 3D printing is transforming healthcare as we know it.

Since Kaiba’s story, 3D printing in medicine has been skyrocketing. And the list of objects that have already been successfully printed in this field demonstrates the potential that this technology holds for healthcare in the near future.
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3D-printed guide could find use in better nerve repairs

3D-printed guide could find use in better nerve repairs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
When someone suffers an injury that results in a severed nerve, the usual treatment involves sewing the two severed ends directly back together, or bridging them by suturing in a nerve graft. Such repairs don't always function perfectly, however. What works better is to let the two ends grow back into each other. Scientists at the University of Sheffield have developed a means of helping them do so, in the form of a 3D-printed nerve guidance conduit (NGC).

An NGC is essentially just a tiny tube that the two nerve ends are fed into either end of. As they grow, they're guided towards one another, until they finally merge. Non-3D-printed NGCs are already sometimes used to repair damaged nerves, although because they're only available in a limited number of designs, their applications are limited.
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23andMe granted authorization by FDA to market first direct-to-consumer genetic test | KurzweilAI

23andMe granted authorization by FDA to market first direct-to-consumer genetic test | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
23andMe, Inc., a personal genetics company formerly forced by the FDA to halt sales of its direct-to-consumer Personal Genome Service, has now been granted authority by the FDA to market the first direct-to-consumer genetic test under a regulatory classification for novel devices.

The new permission is limited to Bloom Syndrome and autosomal recessive disorders.

The approval came in under the FDA’s “de novo classification option” for “novel devices of low to moderate risk that are not substantially equivalent to an already legally marketed device,” explained 23andMe in a statement.

The FDA is also reclassifying autosomal recessive carrier screening tests, with the intention to exempt such carrier tests from FDA premarket review.
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The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands | KurzweilAI

The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A trip to the doctor is almost a guarantee of misery. You'll make an appointment months in advance. You'll probably wait for several hours until you hear the
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Natural molecule found to slow the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

Natural molecule found to slow the onset of Alzheimer’s disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it
While a decisive cure is yet to be found for Alzheimer’s disease, research is offering up ways that it could be slowed or even have its symptoms reversed. The latest cause for hope involves a naturally occurring molecule that researchers have found can serve as an inhibitor, intervening to halt progress of the disease during its formative stages.

The onset of Alzheimer’s disease is believed to correlate with the accumulation of brain plaques, a buildup of toxic protein clusters called oligomers that cause irreparable damage to the synapses and lead to symptoms such as memory loss. The Cambridge team, much like a number of other research efforts around the world, is examining this process to ascertain where, if at all, it might be halted.
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Ultrasound technique shown to reverse Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice

Ultrasound technique shown to reverse Alzheimer’s symptoms in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided ultrasound has shown to help treat symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The technique was found to improve brain performance in the animals and has the r...
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Researchers shed new light on skin-based immune system

Researchers shed new light on skin-based immune system | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The skin is the body's first line of defense against infection, with an extensive network of skin-based immune cells responsible for detecting the presence of foreign invaders. However, in addition to pathogens, an immune response can be triggered by allergens or even our own cells, resulting in unwanted inflammation and allergies. Researchers have now shed new light on the way the immune system in our skin works, paving the way for future improvements in tackling infections, allergies and autoimmune diseases.

An international team, comprising scientists from Monash University and the University of Melbourne in Australia and Harvard University in the US, looked at how our skin’s immune cells make sense of foreign lipids (fat-like molecules derived from bacteria), as well as lipids from human cells.
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Ray Kurzweil receives 2015 Technical Grammy Award for outstanding achievements in music technology | KurzweilAI

Ray Kurzweil receives 2015 Technical Grammy Award for outstanding achievements in music technology | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Ray Kurzweil received the 2015 Technical Grammy Award on February 7, 2015 for his lifetime of work in the field of music technology. One of his primary
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UberBlox - New Modular Construction Set To Build A 3D Printer

UberBlox - New Modular Construction Set To Build A 3D Printer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

There’s a new game in town. It’s not really like Legos; it’s definitely more like Construx. But it’s metal, and you can make some pretty crazy automated machines from it. It’s called UberBlox. The construction set, like Construx, is reconfigurable, modular, and easy to use. Metal is, of course, more rigid than plastic and the control components are built around the Arduino and Raspberry Pi. The idea is that anyone can use their sub-system of related components and sub-assemblies to design and construct their own Uberblox machines.

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Software analyzes human genome in as little as 90 minutes

Software analyzes human genome in as little as 90 minutes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Whereas it took 13 years and cost US$3 billion to sequence a human genome for the first time, senior author Peter White notes that now "even the smallest research groups can complete genomic sequencing in a matter of days." The chokepoint lies in the next step: calibrating and analyzing the billions of generated data points for genetic variants that could lead to diseases.
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Researchers find different pathways responsible for sugar addiction and healthy eating

Researchers find different pathways responsible for sugar addiction and healthy eating | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Many who have tried to kick the sweet white crystals will tell you that "sugar addiction" is very real, and there are indeed neurological underpinnings that back them up. MIT researchers have now discovered that the pathways of the brain responsible for sugar addiction may differ from those which govern drug addiction and healthy eating, which could be a boon for studies and treatment of compulsive eating and obesity.

According to the researchers, solving a person’s “addiction” (emphasis theirs) to sugar is more complicated than solving drug addiction as it requires reducing a drive to eat unhealthily, rather than simply reducing the drive to eat. In fact, feeding and drug addiction drives are different things even though they stem from the same areas of the brain.
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March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Colorectal cancer is treatable when detected early and today there are more than 1 million survivors living in the United States.

Colorectal cancer or colon cancer, occurs in the colon or rectum and although it affects men and women of all ages and races, colorectal cancer is more prevalent in people 50 years or older. Early detection through proper screening is key.



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Did you know: 1.5M Americans have IBD, which increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer -and- makes it harder to detect early symptoms.


If you or someone you know has IBD, make sure they get screened for CRC!


#getscreened #crcawareness #IBD

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Magnetic nanoparticles could stop blood-clot-caused strokes and heart attacks | KurzweilAI

Magnetic nanoparticles could stop blood-clot-caused strokes and heart attacks | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Houston Methodist researchers have developed magnetic nanoparticles that in tests delivered drugs to destroy blood clots up to 1000 times faster than a commonly used clot-busting technique.

If the drug delivery system performs similarly well in planned human clinical trials, it could mean a major step forward in the prevention of strokes, heart attacks, pulmonary embolisms, and other dire circumstances where clots — if not quickly busted — can cause severe tissue damage and death, the researchers say.
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Researchers Find Way to Harness Brain to Control Bionic Hands

In a new study in the journal Lancet, three men who completely lost the use of their hands because of devastating nerve damage were fitted with robotic hands they can control with their thoughts.
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Injected into the body, self-healing nanogel acts as customized long-term drug supply | KurzweilAI

Injected into the body, self-healing nanogel acts as customized long-term drug supply | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
MIT chemical engineers have designed a new type of self-healing hydrogel that can be injected through a syringe to supply one or two different drugs at a time.

In theory, gels could be useful for delivering drugs for treating cancer, macular degeneration, or heart disease because they can be molded into specific shapes and designed to release their payload in a specific location over a specified time period. However, current gels are not very practical because they must be implanted surgically.
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Olive oil ingredient leads cancer cells to their death

Olive oil ingredient leads cancer cells to their death | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An ingredient found in extra-virgin olive oil called oleocanthal has been known as a compound capable of killing a variety of human cancer cells, but how this process actually played out was not understood. Now, a team of researchers has uncovered not only how oleocanthal destroys cancer cells, but that it is able to do so while leaving healthy cells unharmed.
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Promising lung cancer breath test device moves into clinical trials

Promising lung cancer breath test device moves into clinical trials | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The developers of a promising new lung cancer detection tool have announced they are now moving into clinical trials. By relying on breath tests to diagnose the illness, it is hoped that the devic...
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Oil-exuding silicone could prevent bacterial infections

Oil-exuding silicone could prevent bacterial infections | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Whenever foreign objects such as implants are placed within the human body, there's a danger that bacteria could collect on them, leading to infections. Now, however, scientists have created a mat...
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Promising peptide for traumatic brain injury, heart attack and stroke | KurzweilAI

Promising peptide for traumatic brain injury, heart attack and stroke | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Strokes, heart attacks, and traumatic brain injuries are separate diseases with certain shared pathologies that achieve a common end: cell death and human injury due to hypoxia, or lack of oxygen.

In these diseases, a lack of blood supply to affected tissues begins a signaling pathway that ultimately halts the production of energy-releasing ATP molecules — a death sentence for most cells.

By employing derivatives of humanin, a naturally occurring peptide encoded in the genome of cellular mitochondria, researchers at Ben Gurion University of the Negev are working to interrupt this process,
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Tiny soft robotic hands with magnetic nanoparticles could improve cancer diagnostics, drug delivery | KurzweilAI

“Soft robotics” researchers have developed a flexible, microscopic hand-like gripper that could help doctors perform remotely guided surgical procedures, biopsies, and someday deliver therapeutic drugs to hard-to-reach places.

David H. Gracias at The Johns Hopkins University and colleagues note that many robotic tools require cords to provide power to generate their movements, adding to the bulk of robots and limiting the spaces they can access.

To address this constraint, scientists have turned to hydrogels. These soft materials can swell in response to changes in temperature, acidity or light, providing energy to carry out tasks without being tethered to a power source.
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3D printed heart saves girl's life

3D printed heart saves girl's life | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A two-year-old girl who was born with a serious heart defect has had a life-saving operation thanks to a 3D printer.

Mina had a hole between two chambers of her heart, but doctors were able to use the printer to create a model to help surgeons plan the successful operation.

Mina and mum Natasha spoke to BBC Breakfast, along with Dr Tarique Hussain who printed the model of her heart.
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Resveratrol, found in red grapes, may help prevent memory loss in the elderly | KurzweilAI

Resveratrol, found in red grapes, may help prevent memory loss in the elderly | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Resveratrol, touted for its potential to prevent heart disease, may also help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research from Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine.

Ashok K. Shetty, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine and Director of Neurosciences at the Institute for Regenerative Medicine, has been studying the potential benefit of resveratrol, an antioxidant found in the skin of red grapes, as well as in red wine, peanuts, and some berries, and also available in pill form.

Shetty and his team believe resveratrol also has positive effects on the hippocampus, an area of the brain that is critical to functions such as memory, learning, and mood.
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Eric Larson's curator insight, February 6, 2:58 PM

Interesting solution for heart disease.

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Managing diabetes could one day be as easy as popping a pill

Managing diabetes could one day be as easy as popping a pill | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at Cornell University have successfully treated diabetic rats by engineering a strain of lactobacillus, a rod-shaped bacteria common in the human gut, resulting in up to 30 percent lower blood glucose levels. The technology could pave the way for a new treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes that could one day see managing diabetes be as easy as taking a daily probiotic pill..

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. In the US, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that around 29 million people have the disease, many of whom aren't even aware they have it. The Cornell study could take us one step closer to a safe, effective way for people to control the disease.
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