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Nose cell transplants allow paralyzed dogs to walk again

Nose cell transplants allow paralyzed dogs to walk again | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from the University of Cambridge’s Veterinary School, working with colleagues from the UK Medical Research Council’s Regenerative Medicine Centre, have got disabled dogs walking again.

 

More specifically, they’ve used the dogs’ own cells to repair their spinal cord injuries, and at least partially restored the functionality of their back legs. The researchers believe that the process shows promise for use on physically challenged humans.

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New sensor may allow for better long-term monitoring of patients' vitals

New sensor may allow for better long-term monitoring of patients' vitals | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a new silver nanowire sensor that has the potential to significantly improve long-term patient health monitoring. The new sensor is as accurate as those used in hospitals, and thanks to its dry nature and flexibility, is well suited to electrophysiological monitoring when the patient is moving around.

With existing hospital-based electrophysiological sensors, such as EKGs, a layer of electrolytic gel must be maintained between the sensor and patient’s skin in order for accurate recordings to be obtained. This wet electrode method provides accurate results, but lacks practicality, as the gel must be reapplied to keep it from drying up. If this occurs, the sensor will be less effective at reporting stats and may cause discomfort to the patient.
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Microcapsule delivery method opens door for protein to treat osteoarthritis

Microcapsule delivery method opens door for protein to treat osteoarthritis | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Although known to reduce inflammation and aid in the repair of damaged tissue, the protein molecule called C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) could not previously be put to use in treating osteoarthritis as it breaks down easily in the body. But now researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) could make this possible by using slow-release microcapsules containing the protein.

CNP, which occurs naturally in the body, being produced by the endothelium and the heart, is believed to play a major role in vascular and cardiac function. Although it reduces inflammation and aids in the repair of damaged tissue, it could not perform these functions in the treatment of osteoarthritis, even if injected into the cartilage tissue, because it breaks down before it can reach the site of the damage.
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Mouthpiece could let the deaf

Mouthpiece could let the deaf | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In order to regain their sense of hearing, many deaf people currently opt for cochlear implants. Such devices are expensive, however, plus they must be surgically installed. That's why researchers...
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Stratasys' Eden260VS for Dental Printing - 3D Printing Industry

Stratasys' Eden260VS for Dental Printing - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Stratasys has released a new dental 3D printing system, the Objet Eden260VS, which now has automatic soluble support, for easier printing and clean-up.
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Heart Disease Treated Using 3D Printed Models - 3D Printing Industry

Heart Disease Treated Using 3D Printed Models - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Pre-surgical tests using 3D printed models is proving itself to be one of the most critical medical applications of 3D printing, 3D scanning and 3D software. When all of these tools are used together in one process in medical settings, the results have been overwhelmingly positive for both patients and surgeons. There are some applications that occupy “pivot” zones, where we can expect to see them used similarly in a variety of different ways. What those pivot zones are, we will have to wait and see.
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Exercise improves your ‘healthspan,’ but why that is remains a mystery

Exercise improves your ‘healthspan,’ but why that is remains a mystery | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It has become increasingly clear that exercising into old age is one of the best -- if not the best -- thing you can do to grow old successfully. By this, researchers mean aging with the fewest number of infirmities and the least deterioration of physiological function. There's even a word for it: exercise (and other efforts such as quitting smoking) improves your "healthspan," the number of years you are able to live in good health. Which, as we know, is not keeping up with average life expectancy for much of the developed world's population.
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Ray Kurzweil receives 2015 Technical Grammy Award for lifetime achievement in music technology | KurzweilAI

Ray Kurzweil receives 2015 Technical Grammy Award for lifetime achievement in music technology | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Ray Kurzweil will receive the 2015 Technical Grammy Award for his lifetime of work in the field of music technology.

One of his primary inventions paved the way for re-creating acoustic instruments with electronic equivalents.
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Congratulations Ray! We are proud and honored to work with you.

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Spinal implant could one day let paralyzed people walk again

Spinal implant could one day let paralyzed people walk again | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Three years ago, scientists reported success in getting paralyzed rats to walk again. At the time, the technology they used still wasn't practical for long-term use in humans. Thanks to new resear...
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Stress Fractures | The Scientist Magazine®

Stress Fractures | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Social stress seems to reach deep into cellular control centers to shape key aspects of the immune system—and, as a result, can impair one’s ability to avoid or fight off disease and psychiatric disorders. Now researchers are trying to pin down the molecular mechanisms by which psychological stress is translated into gene-expression changes, and to develop a more precise understanding of the conditions under which stress-mediated gene regulation affects health.
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Two Irish Hospitals to Print Heart Models - 3D Printing Industry

Two Irish Hospitals to Print Heart Models - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The enormous advantages of having a 3D printed physical model of a patient’s insides before surgery have become clear for a few years now, with private companies launching a wide range of services to go from the DICOMM data of MRI’s and CT Scans to a physical 3D printed replica. In an effort to make this service available to surgeons in two Irish Hospitals, the GMedTech center at the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT) will be using its 3D printers to create exact replica’s of hearts for patients awaiting cardiac surgery.
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Brainsgate and Formlabs Team Up - 3D Printing Industry

Brainsgate and Formlabs Team Up - 3D Printing Industry | Longevity science | Scoop.it
It’s always exciting news to discover that 3D printing is finding its way into medical treatments and research. Most recently, Princeton embedded tiny light emitting diodes into a contact lens, proving that the capabilities of 3D printing include creating complex electronics. And, most broadly, the ability of 3D printing to create custom prosthetics like the ones fashioned by Robohand USA and E-Nable provide heartwarming proof of the power of 3D printing to change lives.
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Scripps Research Institute Scientists Uncover New, Fundamental Mechanism for How Resveratrol Provides Health Benefits

Scripps Research Institute Scientists Uncover New, Fundamental Mechanism for How Resveratrol Provides Health Benefits | Longevity science | Scoop.it
LA JOLLA, CA and JUPITER, FL—December 22, 2014—Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that resveratrol, the red-wine ingredient once touted as an elixir of youth, powerfully activates an evolutionarily ancient stress response in human cells. The finding should dispel much of the mystery and controversy about how resveratrol really works.

“This stress response represents a layer of biology that has been largely overlooked, and resveratrol turns out to activate it at much lower concentrations than those used in prior studies,” said senior investigator Paul Schimmel, professor and member of the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at TSRI.
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Optogenetics captures synaptic transmission in live mammalian brain for the first time

Optogenetics captures synaptic transmission in live mammalian brain for the first time | Longevity science | Scoop.it

EPFL scientists Aurélie Pala and Carl Petersen have observed and measured synaptic transmission in a live animal for the first time, using optogenetics* to stimulate single neurons in the mouse barrel cortex (which processes sensory information from the mouse’s whiskers). They shined blue light on the neurons containing a gene-based light-sensitive protein, activating the neurons to fire. Then using microelectrodes, they measured resulting electrical signals in neighboring interneuron cells.


They also used an advanced imaging technique (two-photon microscopy) that allowed them to look deep into the brain of the live mouse and identify the type of each interneuron they were studying.

The data showed that the neuronal transmissions from the light-sensitive neurons differed depending on the type of interneuron on the receiving end. Only a few studies have directly investigated synaptic transmission between specific neocortical neurons in vivo, presumably due to the technical difficulties in obtaining intracellular recordings from connected pairs of neurons in vivo, the authors say in their (open-access) paper in Neuron.


The research overcomes a limitation of in vitro (lab) studies, where associated biomolecules are different from those in a live animal, and where cutting neural tissue for lab work also introduces artifacts, the researchers suggest. “This is a proof-of-concept study,” says Pala, who received her PhD for this work. “Nonetheless, we think that we can use optogenetics to put together a larger picture of connectivity between other types of neurons in other areas of the brain.”


The scientists are now aiming to explore other neuronal connections in the mouse barrel cortex. They also want to try this technique on awake mice, to see how switching neuronal activity on and off with a light can affect higher brain functions.


* Optogenetics works by inserting the gene of an light-sensitive protein into live neurons, from a single cell to an entire family of them. The genetically modified neurons then produce the light-sensitive protein, which sits on their outside, the membrane. There, it acts as an electrical channel – something like a gate. When light is shone on the neuron, the channel opens up and allows electrical ions to flow into the cell; a bit like a battery being charged by a solar cell. The addition of electrical ions changes the voltage balance of the neuron, and if the optogenetic stimulus is sufficiently strong it generates an explosive electrical signal in the neuron



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Targeting immune cell halts type 1 diabetes development in mice

Targeting immune cell halts type 1 diabetes development in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists working at St Louis University (SLU) have demonstrated the ability to prevent type 1 diabetes in mice by focusing on a particular immune cell whose properties weren't entirely clear. They discovered that impeding the development of this cell they could in fact stop the onset of the disease.

The lack of insulin production that defines type 1 diabetes and makes blood-sugar levels difficult to manage is driven by the body's immune system. A couple of culprits are already known to scientists in the form of two "T-cells", which have a hand in the demise of the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin.
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Nanobot micromotors deliver medical payload in living creature for the first time

Nanobot micromotors deliver medical payload in living creature for the first time | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Micro-motor powered nanobots created by UC, San Diego researchers, and propelled by gas bubbles made from a reaction with the contents of the stomach in which they were deposited, have been succes...
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Temporary tattoo could let diabetics monitor glucose levels without jabbing themselves

Temporary tattoo could let diabetics monitor glucose levels without jabbing themselves | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Finger-prick blood tests are currently an unpleasant necessity for diabetics. Perhaps before too long, however, the blood glucose information gathered in those tests could be attained using someth...
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Lifespan of fruit flies prolonged by selecting best cells in the body

Lifespan of fruit flies prolonged by selecting best cells in the body | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Using a technique in which better cells in the body to be selected at the expense of more damaged ones, researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland have managed to significantly increase the lifespan of the common fruit fly.
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First contracting human muscle ever grown in laboratory

First contracting human muscle ever grown in laboratory | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers working at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering claim to have produced a laboratory first by having grown human muscle tissue that contracts and reacts to stimuli. Electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals have all been used to produce reactions in the tissue that show it behaves in the same way that natural human muscles does. As a result, laboratory grown tissue may soon provide researchers with the ability to study diseases and assess drugs without invasive procedures on human subjects.
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Freedom Driver allows man with artificial heart to await transplant at home

Freedom Driver allows man with artificial heart to await transplant at home | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Traditionally, heart failure patients awaiting organ transplants have been anchored to a hospital bed by a washing machine-sized device that keeps blood pumping through their veins. But for Stan L...
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Drug shown to prevent and treat diabetes in mice

Drug shown to prevent and treat diabetes in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Research carried out at the University of California (UC), Davis and the University of Barcelona has uncovered an enzyme inhibitor found to prevent and reverse the effects of diabetes in obese mice. In addition to discovering a potential form of treatment for the disease, scientists say the study has shone new light on healthy properties of fatty acids.
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‘Glowing’ nanotech guides cancer surgery, kills remaining cancer cells | KurzweilAI

‘Glowing’ nanotech guides cancer surgery, kills remaining cancer cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Oregon State University researchers have developed a new way to selectively insert compounds into cancer cells — a system that will help surgeons identify malignant tissues and then, in combination with phototherapy, kill any remaining cancer cells after a tumor is removed.

The method should allow more accurate surgical removal of solid tumors at the same time it eradicates any remaining cancer cells. In laboratory tests, it completely prevented cancer recurrence after phototherapy.
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Man-made ligament could replace ruptured ACLs

Man-made ligament could replace ruptured ACLs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
According to professor of biomedical engineering Guillermo Ameer, who is leading the project, the use of patellar tendon grafts often results in knee discomfort that never goes away. This isn't surprising, as the procedure involves removing part of the existing patellar tendon to take the place of the ACL – in fact, what's left of the patellar tendon can subsequently end up rupturing, too.

That's where his team's engineered ACL comes in. Its main body is made from braided polyester fibers, with a tensile strength similar to that of the natural ligament. At either end of it, however, those fibers are blended into a mixture of a porous antioxidant biomaterial developed previously in his lab, and hydroxyapatite (a form of calcium) nanocrystals – these occur naturally in bones and teeth.
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New approach could lead cancer cells down path of destruction

New approach could lead cancer cells down path of destruction | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists from Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine have discovered a potential treatment that may steer cancer cells toward their own destruction. The study focused on a particular gene that was found to influence levels of a tumor-fighting protein called 53BP1, the heightened presence of which makes cancer cells more vulnerable to existing forms of treatment.

The proposed therapeutic approach centers on the repairing of DNA, a process that sees the body mend molecules damaged by everything from reactive oxygen components to radiation and chemical agents. More specifically, it focuses on a double-strand break, a type of injury that sees both strands of the double helix severed, leading to damaged and dead cells.
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U.S. cancer deaths fell 22 percent since 1991

More than 1.5 million Americans avoided death from cancer since 1991 thanks to falling smoking rates and better cancer prevention, detection and treatments, according to a study from the American Cancer Society.

The overall rate of deaths from cancer decreased from about 215 per 100,000 people in 1991 to about 169 per 100,000 people in 2011, researchers found.
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A step toward a potential anti-aging drug | KurzweilAI

A step toward a potential anti-aging drug | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
According to a new study published in Science Translational Medicine, researchers have tested a potential anti-aging drug called everolimus (AKA RAD001) — an analog (version) of the drug rapamycin (sirolimus)*.

In previous research, rapamycin extended the life span of mice by 9 to 14%, even when treatment was initiated late in life, and it improved a variety of aging-related conditions in old mice, including tendon stiffening, cardiac dysfunction, cognitive decline, and decreased mobility.

These findings raise the possibility that “mTOR inhibitors”* (like rapamycin and RAD001) may have beneficial effects on aging and aging-related conditions in humans.
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