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Heavy drinkers may risk brain bleed at a young age: study

Heavy drinkers may risk brain bleed at a young age: study | Longevity science | Scoop.it

(Reuters) - People who drink heavily - at least four drinks a day - may be at risk of suffering a brain hemorrhage at a relatively early age.

 

Although the study itself does not prove that drinking = stroke, the patients who did drink heavily were twice as likely to die. And at a younger age.

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Digitizing Surgery: How New Technologies Will Transform Old Medical Practices [Video] - Singularity HUB

From one point of view, surgery is a fairly barbaric means of improving your health. After all, your body is cut open, organs are moved around or removed, and doctors probe with their fingers and use instruments to repair damaged tissues. But these practices are in the midst of significant change.

At last year's Exponential Medicine conference in San Diego, Dr. Catherine Mohr, Vice President of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical, took the stage to address how emerging technologies are reshaping medical practice. "We're talking about the future of intervention. When we look at where things are going in the future, it's always a good idea to understand what we're doing now and where we've come from."
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Smartphone-Sized Genetic Sequencer Transcribes Entire Bacterial Genome - Singularity HUB

Smartphone-Sized Genetic Sequencer Transcribes Entire Bacterial Genome - Singularity HUB | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists first transcribed the genome—or complete genetic code—of a free living organism in 1995. Sequencing the bacterium H. Influenzae took a little over a year, cost about $1 million, and required a (then) significant amount of computing power. In 1997, Escherichia coli (E. coli) similarly surrendered its genetic secrets.

Less than two decades on, the entire genome of E. coli has again been sequenced. This time, however, researchers used a handheld machine the size of a smartphone. Oxford Nanopore’s MinION genetic sequencer plugs into a laptop by USB and taps cloud computers for the heavy lifting.
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Cocktail of chemicals may trigger cancer | KurzweilAI

Cocktail of chemicals may trigger cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A global task force of 174 scientists from leading research centers in 28 countries has studied the link between mixtures of commonly encountered chemicals and the development of cancer. The open-access study selected 85 chemicals not considered carcinogenic to humans and found 50 of them actually supported key cancer-related mechanisms at exposures found in the environment today.

According to co-author cancer Biologist Hemad Yasaei from Brunel University London, “This research backs up the idea that chemicals not considered harmful by themselves are combining and accumulating in our bodies to trigger cancer and might lie behind the global cancer epidemic we are witnessing. We urgently need to focus more resources to research the effect of low dose exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the food we eat, air we breathe, and water we drink.”
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Here’s how a five-day diet that mimics fasting may ‘reboot’ the body and reduce cancer risk

Here’s how a five-day diet that mimics fasting may ‘reboot’ the body and reduce cancer risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Now scientists say they've developed a five-day, once-a-month diet that mimics fasting -- and is safe.


In the study, which was published in the journal Cell Metabolism and funded by the National Institute on Aging, participants who intermittently fasted for three months had reduced risk factors for an amazing range of issues: aging, cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease. While the number of study participants was small -- only 19 who tried the diet -- the results are so promising that the University of Southern California researcher who helped develop the regimen is already talking about trying to get approval from the Food and Drug Administration so that it can be recommended for patients.



Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Ray & Terry have been recommending a partial fast system for years. The easiest way to get benefits? Fast from 7pm to 7am every day. There's a 12 hour fast with less effort. This ensures you aren't spiking blood sugar at bedtime or interrupting sleep with digestive processes.


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Human Organs-on-Chips wins Design of the Year 2015

Human Organs-on-Chips wins Design of the Year 2015 | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A micro-device lined with living human cells able to mimic the function of living organs has been declared the overall winner of the Design Museum's Design of the Year Award for 2015.

Something of a departure from last year's winner, the Heydar Aliyev Center, by Zaha Hadid, Human Organs-on-Chips is the competition's first winner from the field of medicine in its eight-year history. Designed by Donald Ingber and Dan Dongeun Huh at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute, the Human Organs-on-Chips project comprises a series of chips that mimic real human organs, including a lung-on-a-chip, and gut-on-a-chip.
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Tissue scaffold technology could help rebuild large organs | KurzweilAI

Tissue scaffold technology could help rebuild large organs | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Liverpool have developed a new tissue scaffold (support structure) technology that could one day make it possible to engineer large organs.

Currently, tissue engineering has been limited to growing small pieces of tissue, because larger dimensions reduce the oxygen supply to the cells in the center of the tissue.
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FDA moves to ban trans fat from U.S. food supply

FDA moves to ban trans fat from U.S. food supply | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday said it will give manufacturers three years to remove artificial trans fat from the nation’s food supply, a move that the agency estimates could reduce coronary heart disease and prevent thousands of heart attack deaths each year.
Ray and Terry's 's insight:

FDA moves to ban trans fats. Which would you rather see banned- GMO's or trans fats?

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First working synthetic immune organ with controllable antibodies | KurzweilAI

First working synthetic immune organ with controllable antibodies | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Cornell University engineers have created a functional, synthetic immune organoid (a lab-grown ball of cells with some of the features of a normal organ) that produces antibodies. The engineered organ has implications for everything from rapid production of immune therapies to new frontiers in cancer or infectious disease research.

The first-of-its-kind immune organoid was created in the lab of Ankur Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, who applies engineering principles to the study and manipulation of the human immune system.
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Tiny particles mimic the body's pancreas cells to combat type 1 diabetes

Tiny particles mimic the body's pancreas cells to combat type 1 diabetes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The destruction of the pancreatic cells that leads to type 1 diabetes arises when the body's own immune cells identify them as foreign targets and begin to attack them. But a new technique using tiny particles to mimic the form and function of the pancreatic cells is showing promise in halting the onset of the condition.

The work undertaken by scientists from the Germans Trias i Pujol Research Institute and Catalan Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Spain explores the potential for a type 1 diabetes vaccine. To start out with, the team developed an immunotherapy technique where the body's immune cells are extracted, modified and then re-injected.
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Scientists come a step closer to "regrowing" limbs

Scientists come a step closer to "regrowing" limbs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Currently, recipients of limb transplants need to take immunosuppressive drugs for the rest of their lives. If we could grow our own replacement limbs, however, that wouldn't be necessary.
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Not So Noncoding | The Scientist Magazine®

Not So Noncoding | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Eric Olson and his colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center were combing through muscle-specific long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to understand their function when they found one expressed exclusively in skeletal muscle. Although the RNA had previously been categorized as noncoding, its sequence contained a short stretch that looked suspiciously like a coding region.
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Large U.S. cancer trial to match genetic glitches to targeted drugs

The National Cancer Institute in July will start enrolling patients in a clinical trial seeking to match the underlying genetic defect driving a person's tumor with one or more of 20 approved or experimental drugs targeting that gene.

The announcement, made at the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting on Monday, is meant to use approved or experimental drugs to develop insights that will ultimately enable doctors to prescribe drugs based on the molecular cause of the cancer, rather than the organ in which it was originally discovered.
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Pulsed electric field technology may rejuvenate skin function and appearance | KurzweilAI

A team of Tel Aviv University and Harvard Medical School researchers has devised a novel non-invasive tissue-stimulation technique using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to generate new skin tissue growth.



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Bionic eye clinical trial results: long-term safety, efficacy | KurzweilAI

Bionic eye clinical trial results: long-term safety, efficacy | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Three-year clinical trial results of the Argus II retinal implant (“bionic eye”) have found that the device restored some visual function and quality of life for 30 people blinded by retinitis pigmentosa, a rare degenerative eye disease. The findings, published in an open-access paper in the journal Ophthalmology, also showed long-term efficacy, safety and reliability for the device.

Retinitis pigmentosa is an incurable disease that affects about 1 in 4,000 Americans and causes slow vision loss that eventually leads to blindness.
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Micro-tentacles for tiny robots can handle delicate objects like blood vessels | KurzweilAI

Micro-tentacles for tiny robots can handle delicate objects like blood vessels | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Iowa State University engineers have developed microrobotic tentacles that could allow small robots to safely handle delicate objects.

As described in an open-access research paper in the journal Scientific Reports, the tentacles are microtubes just a third of an inch long and less than a hundredth of an inch wide. They’re made from PDMS, a transparent elastomer that can be a liquid or a soft, rubbery solid.

“Most robots use two fingers and to pick things up they have to squeeze,” said Jaeyoun (Jay) Kim, an Iowa State University associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory. “But these tentacles wrap around very gently.”
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Reactivation of a single gene turns colorectal cancer cells back into normal tissue

Reactivation of a single gene turns colorectal cancer cells back into normal tissue | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Future cancer treatments may target your genes rather than the cancerous cells themselves. A new study found that reactivating a single gene was enough to stop and reverse colorectal cancer (that's cancer of the colon, or bowels) in mice, with a return to normal intestinal functions within just four days and tumors gone within two weeks. The concept, though not the specific method, could lead to new treatments of a variety of cancers.

Nearly 700,000 people around the world die from colorectal cancer each year, which makes it one of the biggest cancer killers (lung cancer is the most common, at more than 1.5 million deaths, while cancers of the liver result in around 750,000 deaths a year and deaths from cancers of the stomach stand a little over 700,000). In the United States, where colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and in women (or second most common combined across both sexes), diagnoses for the disease numbered over 135,000 people in 2011.
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How to make instant carbon nanoparticles at home for cool biomedical uses | KurzweilAI

How to make instant carbon nanoparticles at home for cool biomedical uses | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
How would you like to produce carbon nanoparticles small enough to evade the body’s immune system, that reflect light in the near-infrared range for easy detection in the body, and even carry payloads of pharmaceutical drugs to targeted tissues — all in the privacy of your own home?

If so, well, University of Illinois bioengineering professors Dipanjan Pan and Rohit Bhargava have a DIY recipe for you.

Unlike other methods of making carbon nanoparticles — which require expensive equipment and purification processes that can take days — with the handy-dandy new approach, you can generates your own biomedical-class nanoparticles in a few hours, using store-bought molasses and honey. That and a pig.
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Nanorobots wade through blood to deliver drugs

Nanorobots wade through blood to deliver drugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers are now reporting a new technique whereby nanorobots are made to swim swiftly through the fluids like blood to reach their destination.
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Good news for chocolate lovers: The more you eat, the lower your risk of heart disease, study suggests

A new study published in the journal Heart looked at the effect of diet on long-term health of 25,000 volunteers and found that the answer to how much chocolate can be good for you is -- a lot. The researchers found that study participants who ate up to 100 grams of chocolate a day had lower heart disease and stroke risk.
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Eric Larson's curator insight, June 17, 4:42 PM

Chocolate good for you?

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Virtual-reality display allows stroke patients to spontaneously recover use of paralyzed arm | KurzweilAI

Virtual-reality display allows stroke patients to spontaneously recover use of paralyzed arm | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
In a clinical study, Spanish researchers have used a Microsoft Kinect to help stroke patients increase their ability to use a paralyzed arm.

Stroke patients with “hemiparesis” —- reduced muscle strength on one side of the body — often under-use their affected limbs even though they still have some motor function. A long period of non-use of the affected “paretic” limb can lead to further loss of function.
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VirScan provides complete viral history from a drop of blood

VirScan provides complete viral history from a drop of blood | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new test developed by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) can test for both past and current infections by analyzing a single drop of patient blood. The researchers consider the method superior to existing techniques, which only search for a single virus at a time.

The method, know as VirScan (Systematic viral epitope scanning), provides an unbiased approach to patient testing. T
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3-D printing tough biogel structures for tissue engineering or soft robots | KurzweilAI

3-D printing tough biogel structures for tissue engineering or soft robots | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Lasagna? No, an open lattice of 3-D printed material, with materials having different characteristics of strength and flexibility indicated by different colors
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Angie Weihs's curator insight, June 18, 2:11 AM

Tissue engineering, who over 50 will have a new face first? The race is not quite on yet.

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Wondering how long you have? Simple score gives five-year death risk

Wondering how long you have? Simple score gives five-year death risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 LONDON (Reuters) - Health researchers have developed a scientifically rigorous death risk calculator that predicts a person's risk of dying within five years and say they hope people will use it to improve

Ray and Terry's 's insight:

Just for a lark.

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Brain Drain | The Scientist Magazine®

Brain Drain | The Scientist Magazine® | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The mammalian brain, long thought to lack a lymphatic system, contains canonical lymphatic vessels that bear the molecular markers of the structures that carry fluid and immune cells from the tissues to the lymph nodes elsewhere in the body, according to a mouse study published today (June 1) in Nature.

“For many years, we said ‘There’s no lymphatic drainage from the brain,’” said Jon Laman, an immunologist at Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, who was not involved in the work, “but this, in a way, is a breakthrough study because it shows the presence and functionality of a lymphatic vessel in the dura mater.” Of the meninges, the three membranes surrounding the brain, the dura mater is the one closest to the skull.
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