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Top six alkaline foods to eat every day for vibrant health

Top six alkaline foods to eat every day for vibrant health | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Too many acid-forming foods can have dire consequences for our health, with "acidosis" being a common diagnosis in diabetics, for example. This is because when the nutrients required to maintain this slightly alkalinestate cannot be obtained from food, the body will instead draw from its own stores, like the bones or other vital tissues - damaging its ability to repair itself and detoxify heavy metals, thereby making a person more vulnerable to fatigue and illness.

 

These foods (mostly vegetables) can help rebalance your diet.

 

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Cauliflower is full of nutrients, just like its green cousins

Cauliflower is full of nutrients, just like its green cousins | Longevity science | Scoop.it

They tell you white foods aren’t as good for you, but that does not include healthful cauliflower.

 

It contains antioxidants, fiber, anti-inflammatory compounds, vitamins, and flavor. This cruciferous vegetable belongs in everyone's healthy diet.

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Cruciferous vegetables intake may inhibit cancer [Breast. 2012] - PubMed - NCBI

Another study has been published touting the significant cancer-protective properties of consuming broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables.

 

This family of vegetables contains compounds that have been shown to help increase the metabolism of those fractions of estrogen that have been associated with cell proliferation and subsequent cancer formation.

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Anti-inflammatory effect of purified dietary anthocyanin in adults with hypercholesterolemia: A randomized controlled trial

Anthocyanins are pigments found in red/purplish fruits and vegetables, including purple cabbage, beets, blueberries, cherries, raspberries and purple grapes, as well as some cereal grains.

 

A study published in 2012 indicates that anthocyanins help reduce inflammation caused by hypercholesterolemia.

 

Eating a variety of colorful foods, emphasizing fruits and vegetables, is continuously upheld as a strategy to help mitigate disease and maintain a healthy long life.

 

REF:

Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, published online August 20, 2012

Authors:Y. Zhu; W. Ling; H. Guo; F. Song; Q. Ye; T. Zou; D. Li; Y. Zhang; G. Li; Y. Xiao; F. Liu; Z. Li; Z. Shi; Y.

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Fruit and vegetable consumption linked with reduced risk of diabetes

Fruit and vegetable consumption linked with reduced risk of diabetes | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Consumption of a greater quantity and variety of fruits and vegetables could slash the risk of diabetes by 21%, according to data from a new study.
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WHFoods: Green beans help preserve bone health

WHFoods: Green beans help preserve bone health | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Did you know that the wealth of vitamin K1 (122% daily value) found in a serving of green beans plays an important role in bone health? Although calcium and vitamin D are often the nutrients highlighted in discussions on bone and prevention of bone-related disease, current research is increasingly revealing the importance of vitamin K.

 

Although much of the bone-related research has focused on the K2 form of the vitamin, the K1 form found in greens beans has also been associated with better bone mineral density and decreased risk of osteopenia and osteoporosis. Vitamin K1 protects our bones by lessening oxidative stress and inflammation, which if chronically elevated, activates osteoclasts, the specialized cells that break down bone.

 

 

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Spicy paper claimed to keep fruits and veggies fresh longer

Spicy paper claimed to keep fruits and veggies fresh longer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While we all know how important it is to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, it can often be difficult to use all that we buy before it spoils. A product known as FreshPaper, however, is claimed to keep such foods fresh two to four times longer than normal – and it does so just using spices.

 

The proprietary mix of organic spices infused in every paper sheet was discovered by inventor Kavita Shukla, when she paid a visit to her grandmother in India. It turned out that her grandmother’s family had been using the formulation for generations, to prolong the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. Although the exact ingredients are a trade secret, the fact that Shukla’s company is called Fenugreen points to the fact that fenugreek is one of them.

 

 

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Dietary antioxidants backed for lower heart attack risk in women

Dietary antioxidants backed for lower heart attack risk in women | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A diet rich in antioxidants could significantly reduce the risk of myocardial infarction in women, according to new research.

 

These data suggest that dietary total antioxidant capacity, based on fruits, vegetables, coffee, and whole grains, is of importance in the prevention of myocardial infarction.

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Review backs nutrition for cutting stroke risk

Review backs nutrition for cutting stroke risk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Increasing dietary intake of fruit and vegetables could help slash the risk of stroke, though more information is needed on how other nutrients and diets can modify risks, says a new review of clinical data.

 

Due to small study groups, inconsistent data, and numerous variables, there is no one diet or nutrient proven to reduce stroke.

 

Bottom Line?

Plenty of vegetables and fruits are healthy for the body, no matter who you ask. When it comes to fat, salt, fish, and other dietary factors, there is no shining answer. But minimizing salt, avoiding fried foods, and enjoying life a little won't steer you wrong.

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