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PIP Biosensor Measures Stress and Gamifies the Art of Conscious Relaxation

PIP Biosensor Measures Stress and Gamifies the Art of Conscious Relaxation | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Most of us know when we’re stressed. Physical cues like stomach butterflies, a flushed face, or muscle tension are hard to miss. Problem is, said symptoms can be very difficult to control. Once going—these things tend to snowball.
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The doctor is in: Virtual therapist to help treat stress disorders

The doctor is in: Virtual therapist to help treat stress disorders | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Sciences (ICT) are developing a virtual therapist that can identify signs of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Bringing together machine learning, natural language processing and computer vision technologies, the SimSensei project is aimed at helping military personnel and their families, while reducing the stigma that is often associated with seeking help.

 

 

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Take a deep breath – scientists working on a stress breath test

Take a deep breath – scientists working on a stress breath test | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Most of us are able to let other people know that we’re stressed, simply by telling them. For people such as those suffering from Alzheimer’s, however, it can be difficult to express such a thought. That’s why UK scientists at Loughborough University and Imperial College London are developing a new test that can determine someone’s stress levels by analyzing their breath.

 

 

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Office Attack: stressed at work? Look out for your heart

LONDON (Reuters) - People who have highly demanding jobs and little freedom to make decisions are 23 percent more likely to have a heart attack compared with their less stressed out colleagues, according.

 

Perspective is needed, though. About 3% of heart attacks may come from work stress, but 36% come from smoking and 12% from sedentary living.

 

If you or someone you know can say 'yes' to 2+ of these points, lifestyle changes are in order.

 

-I work too hard, my job stresses me out

-I spend long hours sitting at my desk

-I rarely exercise

-I take cigarette breaks during the day

-I eat fast food or prepackaged food almost everyday

 

Please protect your heart.

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Chill Out... Reducing stress in a warp speed world

Chill Out... Reducing stress in a warp speed world | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The focus of much of our society is to do more and do it faster. Unfortunately, as much as we like quick video downloads and speedy internet; not waiting in line and getting things out of the way, this constant 'up' mode invokes the stress response. Keep it going and you have chronic stress, which can lead to serious illness.

 

Need a break? Just playing calm music or giving yourself a little breathing room can calm the response. In this article, the Health Ranger gives us some soothing tips to reduce daily stress.

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Fish Oil Aids Hearts by Easing Stress

Fish Oil Aids Hearts by Easing Stress | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Omega-3s moderate blood levels of triglycerides and inflammation – two key drivers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) – and exert beneficial effects on blood pressure and heart rhythms. In addition, it’s likely that omega-3s exert as yet unknown “nutrigenomic” effects on people’s genes. Until now, no one had ever examined the ways in which omega-3s might moderate people’s physiological reactions to stress … some of which promote CVD or are or suspected of doing that.

 

 

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Angry outbursts are linked to increased risk of heart attack

Bottling up emotions is thought to harm both mind and body, but a new study suggests that doing the opposite may be no better.

 

In a study of nearly 4,000 heart attack patients, those who recalled having flown into a rage during the previous year were more than twice as likely to have had their heart attack within two hours of that episode, compared to other times during the year.

 

 

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Health effects of retirement have proved hard for researchers to assess

Health effects of retirement have proved hard for researchers to assess | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When people stop working, everything about their weekday schedule changes. Their lives may move more slowly and be more relaxed. Losing work-related stress may come as a huge relief — and be good for your health. But losing your everyday movement and social interaction can also harm your health.

 

 

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Life Lessons from Those Who Have Walked the Walk

Life Lessons from Those Who Have Walked the Walk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

These individuals over 70 years old have some tips for you to live a life that you will feel good about in 20, 30, 50 years. What can you learn from someone who has been around the block?

 

"Clearly, these people had something to say. The problem is, no one’s been willing to listen,” said Pillemer. His ongoing study, which he calls “The Legacy Project,” has given a voice to the unheard — and turned some conventional thinking about aging on its head.”

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