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Sugary soft drinks may increase risk of kidney stones

People who reported drinking the most sugar-sweetened beverages were the most likely to have kidney stones. Those who drank one or more sugar-sweetened colas a day had a 23 percent higher risk than those who drank them once a week.

 

This is not a conclusive or comprehensive study, but it appears to demonstrate a link between soda and kidney stones.

 

 

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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, May 29, 2013 7:01 PM

Amongst other things....

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It's Not Just Salt: Sugar Boosts Blood Pressure, Too

It's Not Just Salt: Sugar Boosts Blood Pressure, Too | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Reducing sugary drinks, even just a few ounces a day, reduces your risk of blood pressure problems.

 

A study in 2010 found that decreasing the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (already-known culprits of weight gain) lead to a reduction in blood pressure.

 

Elevations in blood pressure increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Even a slight reduction, which could be achieved by cutting out 12 oz of sugary beverages per day, can make a difference in terms of heart health risk.

 

Scientists aren't certain why sugar affects blood pressure. One possible explanation is that sugar irritates the artery walls, which may prompts an increase in pressure.

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Caffeine-diabetes link still unresolved: study

Results of a large new U.S. study confirm that sugary drinks are linked to a heightened risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, but shed little light on whether caffeine helps or hinders the process.

 

Among more than 100,000 men and women followed for 22 years, those who drank sugar-sweetened drinks were as much as 23 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those who didn't, but the risk was about the same whether the drinks contained caffeine or not.

 

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