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Tiny robots in the eye may save patients' sight

Tiny robots in the eye may save patients' sight | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Just like other parts of the body, the retina needs oxygen in order to survive. If it doesn’t receive enough – should its blood supply be restricted, for instance – permanent blindness can result.

 

The sooner that doctors know if a patient’s retina is receiving insufficient oxygen, the better the chances that they can take action in time. Soon, they may be able to use tiny injectable robots to get them the information they need.

 

 

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Honda teams up with Sekisui House on smart home robots

Honda teams up with Sekisui House on smart home robots | Longevity science | Scoop.it

With one in five Japanese citizens now aged 65 or older, various robotics technologies are being developed to prolong independent living and improve quality of life at home.

 

The main alternative to nursing homes and hospitals would be smart homes designed around the needs of the elderly. Earlier this week, Honda announced that it will test some of its life support robots in a mock household environment at the Future Life Showroom, in Sekisui House's brand new SUMUFUMU Lab.

 

 

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How to build a bionic man | KurzweilAI

How to build a bionic man | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Rex the bionic man shows how close technology is to catching up with — and exceeding — the abilities of the human body, The Guardian reports.

Housed within a frame of state-of-the-art prosthetic limbs is a functional heart-lung system, complete with artificial blood pumping through a network of pulsating modified-polymer arteries.

He has a bionic spleen to clean the blood, and an artificial pancreas to keep his blood sugar on the level.

 

 

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Telepresence Robots Invade Hospitals – “Doctors Can Be Anywhere, Anytime”

Telepresence Robots Invade Hospitals –  “Doctors Can Be Anywhere, Anytime” | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Imagine your doctor is 20 miles away, but is still able to assess you as a patient

 

The doctor can steer you down the hall, check your vitals, and talk to you. And, as long as there is a nurse on location, the doctor can check your heart beat over headphones.

 

Introducing Roda, a telepresence robot designed for hospital use.

 

 

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A novel thought-controlled prosthesis for amputees | KurzweilAI

A novel thought-controlled prosthesis for amputees | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

An implantable robotic arm controlled by thoughts is being developed by Chalmers University of Technology industrial doctoral student Max Ortiz Catalan in Sweden.

 

Ever since the 1960s, amputees have been able to use prostheses controlled by electrical impulses in the muscles, their functionality is limited because they are difficult to control, according to Catalan.

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Alexis GC's curator insight, February 13, 2013 8:50 PM

Definitivamente un post digno de RESCOOP
La idea es excelente, poco invasiva y con una muy alta probabilidad de éxito, además de ser totalmente revolucionaria pues hasta ahora no se han podido tomar los impusos electricos directamente de los nervios correspondientes para lograr el movimiento voluntario de una prótesis, con esta idea se aumentará la estabilidad de las señales captadas por los electrodos y podrán realizarse movimientos mucho más finos.

Excelente contenido, bien distribuído y perfectamente referenciado.

Puntaje 9.5 

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Chiba robotic wheelchair turns wheels into legs

Chiba robotic wheelchair turns wheels into legs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Making a wheelchair that can deal with steps and other obstacles has puzzled engineers for decades, with everything from tank treads to spokes tried and found not quite practical.

 

Now a team of engineers from the Chiba Institute of Technology, led by associate professor Shuro Nakajima, have applied a bit of lateral thinking. They have developed a robotic wheelchair that isn't sure what it is. Normally, it operates on wheels like a conventional wheelchair, but when it meets an obstacle, the wheels turn into legs.

 

 

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3D printed robotic exoskeleton gives young girl a helping hand

3D printed robotic exoskeleton gives young girl a helping hand | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A two year old girl born with arthrogryposis, a congenital disease that left her unable to lift her own arms, although able to walk, has been given a new lease on life by a 3D printed robotic exoskeleton, enabling her to move freely for the very first time.

 

 

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Piezoelectric skin provides human-like sense of touch

Piezoelectric skin provides human-like sense of touch | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For years now, scientists across the globe have strived to find a method that gives robots an accurate sense of touch, and with good reason. A robot with an improved ability to feel would be better equipped to identify objects, judge its movements with greater care, and perform more tasks overall. In the latest step towards that goal, researchers at Georgia Tech have crafted a new type of touch-reactive material that's sensitive enough to read fingerprints and could provide robots with a sense of touch that resembles our own.

 

 

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Veebot’s Needle Wielding Robot to Automate Blood Draws

Veebot’s Needle Wielding Robot to Automate Blood Draws | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Taking blood is a fine art. Even the most experienced practioner may require more than one stab to find a vein—seems only natural to wonder, might a robot do the job better? Mountain View’s Veebot thinks so. Veebot wants to take the art out of needlework with their robotic venipuncture machine.

 

 

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Patients and handicapped users test new mind-controlled tech | KurzweilAI

Patients and handicapped users test new mind-controlled tech | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Brain-computer interface allows patient to move his paralyzed arm with his mind (credit: ) More than 100 patients or handicapped users have voluntarily
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A step toward creating a bio-robot hybrid | KurzweilAI

A step toward creating a bio-robot hybrid | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Would it be possible to integrate biological components with advanced robotics, using biological cells to do machine-like functions and interface with an electronic nervous system — in effect, creating an autonomous, multi-cellular biohybrid robot?

 

...manipulation of signal transduction pathways is one way to interface cells with electronics. So the researchers genetically engineered protein cells from a Chinese hamster ovary to produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to visible light. Here’s how:

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Cell-powered "bio-bots" get a wriggle on

Cell-powered "bio-bots" get a wriggle on | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Using a 3D printer, researchers at the University of Illinois have developed synthetic "bio-bots" about seven millimeters long that are powered by embedded cardiac cells that give them the ability to "walk" on their own.

 

The researchers say they are just scratching the surface of what is possible, with their work potentially leading to millimeter-scale medical or environmental sensors that that can seek out and neutralize harmful toxins.

 

The bio-bots, which are made primarily out of a flexible hydrogel, move using a long leg that acts like a flagellum. The leg is coated with heart cells from the common rat so that when the cells beat, they cause the leg to swing, thrusting the robot forward.

 

 

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Light-activated skeletal muscle “blurs the boundary between nature and machines”

Light-activated skeletal muscle “blurs the boundary between nature and machines” | Longevity science | Scoop.it

MIT researchers have genetically engineered muscle cells to make them flex in response to laser light.

 

“With bio-inspired designs, biology is a metaphor, and robotics is the tool to make it happen'" says Professor Asada. "With bio-integrated designs, biology provides the materials, not just the metaphor. This is a new direction we’re pushing in biorobotics.”

 

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iRobot introduces telepresence doctor

iRobot introduces telepresence doctor | Longevity science | Scoop.it

In a medical emergency, seconds count. But if the doctor needed is in another part of the hospital or even another part of town, then those seconds can stretch dangerously. If only the doctor could be in two places at once, then countless lives could be saved.

 

This is one of the most promising applications in the emerging field of telepresence robotics and RP-VITA (Remote Presence Virtual + Independent Telemedicine Assistant)

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