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Painkillers taken by millions could increase heart risk: Prolonged use 'leads to significant danger'

Painkillers taken by millions could increase heart risk: Prolonged use 'leads to significant danger' | Longevity science | Scoop.it
The drugs, known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), include ibuprofen and diclofenac, and also newer medication called coxibs.
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Scientists discover why a specific cancer drug is so effective | KurzweilAI

Scientists discover why a specific cancer drug is so effective | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from the Manchester Collaborative Center for Inflammation Research (MCCIR) have discovered why a particular cancer drug is so effective at killing cells. Their findings could be used to aid the design of future cancer treatments.

Professor Daniel Davis and his team used high quality video imaging to investigate why the drug rituximab is so effective at killing cancerous B cells. It is widely used in the treatment of B cell malignancies, such as lymphoma and leukaemia — as well as in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

 

 

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Treatment to prevent Alzheimer’s disease moves a step closer | KurzweilAI

A new drug designed to prevent the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease could enter clinical trials in a few years’  time, according to scientists.

Alzheimer’s disease begins when a protein called amyloid-β (Aβ) starts to clump together in senile plaques in the brain, damaging nerve cells and leading to memory loss and confusion.

 

 

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Christina Mediate's comment, February 24, 2013 5:56 PM
Being able to stop the formation of senile plaques makes this drug look promising. Those plaques are what cause the damage to the brain cells and start the initial memory loss. I'm anxious to see how it works on humans though. Right now it's only safe on the mice. But this is a very crucial step towards a possible new treatment or cure for the disease.
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Drug-delivery nanoparticles mimic white blood cells to avoid immune rejection | KurzweilAI

Drug-delivery nanoparticles mimic white blood cells to avoid immune rejection | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute have found a possible way to fool the immune system to prevent it from recognizing and destroying nanoparticles before they deliver their drug payloads.

 

“Our goal was to make a particle that is camouflaged within our bodies and escapes the surveillance of the immune system to reach its target undiscovered,” said Department of Medicine Co-Chair Ennio Tasciotti, Ph.D., the study’s principal investigator.

 

 

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Rice-Cell Cocktail Tough on Cancer Cells, Nice to Normal Cells

Rice-Cell Cocktail Tough on Cancer Cells, Nice to Normal Cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Juice from rice cells can knock out two kinds of human cancer cells as well or better than the potent anti-cancer drug Taxol, a Michigan Technological University scientist has discovered in laboratory tests. Plus, it does something Taxol can’t do: it plays nice with normal cells.

 

 

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Drugs shown to stop and even reverse Alzheimer's in mice

Drugs shown to stop and even reverse Alzheimer's in mice | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Although no one is announcing a cure for Alzheimer’s disease just yet, research recently conducted at the University of Southern California does at least offer a glimmer of hope. Using drugs known as TSPO (translocator protein) ligands, scientists there have successfully halted and even reversed the effects of Alzheimer’s in mice.

 

The mice, all of which were male, had been genetically engineered to develop the disease. The drugs were tested on both 7-month-old young adult mice and 24-month-old elderly mice. Because the TSPO ligands increase production of steroid hormones, it was important that the animals’ existing testosterone levels be kept low before beginning the treatment. While this had already occurred naturally with the older mice as a result of aging, the younger ones had to be castrated in order to bring their levels down.

 

 

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Matching Tumors With The Optimal Cancer Drugs - Science 2.0

Matching Tumors With The Optimal Cancer Drugs - Science 2.0 | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Matching Tumors With The Optimal Cancer Drugs
Science 2.0
The main driver of pancreatic cancer, a mutation in a gene called KRAS, has proven difficult to target with treatments.

Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, February 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Very Powereful Quote and an important one for clinicians to understand, " We have a small but effective inventory of 'druggable' mutations that we know play a role in cancer"

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Sanofi says Zaltrap approved in Europe for bowel cancer

French drugmaker Sanofi said on Tuesday that its Zaltrap drug had been approved for marketing in the European Union to treat advanced bowel cancer.

 

The approval follows a recommendation from the European Medicines Agency in November based on a late-stage study of the drug that showed significant improvement in survival among patients with colon cancer.

 

 

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Beer compounds could hold the key to better pharmacueticals

Beer compounds could hold the key to better pharmacueticals | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A beer a day might not keep the doctor away but hops, one of the basic ingredients in beer brewing, could be good for you.

 

In a development that could lead to better drug treatments for diabetes and cancer, University of Washington research associate professor of chemistry, Werner Kaminsky, has determined the exact structure of humulones and their derivatives – the acids in hops that give beer its distinctive bitter taste.

 

 

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