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Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
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Britain launches genome database to improve patient care

LONDON (Reuters) - Up to 100,000 Britons suffering from cancer and rare diseases are to have their genetic codes fully sequenced and mapped as part of government efforts to boost drug development and improve...
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Interactive health records may boost preventive care

Interactive health records may boost preventive care | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Medical records that patients can access online may encourage more people to get recommended screening tests and immunizations, a new study suggests.

 

In a clinical trial at eight primary care practices, researchers found that patients who used such "interactive" health records were more likely to become up-to-date on recommended preventive care.

 

That included screening tests for breast, colon and cervical cancers, and immunizations like the yearly flu shot

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Nokia Sensing X CHALLENGE seeks healthcare tech innovations

Nokia Sensing X CHALLENGE seeks healthcare tech innovations | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Nokia is sponsoring the Nokia Sensing X CHALLENGE. The US$2.25 million global competition is intended to “stimulate the development of sensors and sensing technology to drastically improve and expand the quality and access to healthcare across a wide variety of settings for consumers all around the globe.

 

Teams are required to submit a system, device, or component that can detect a physical value and record or interpret it. Those physical values could be applied to things such as biofluid and tissue samples, bodily structures, a patient’s external environment, body movements, mood/emotion, and body physics – that last category would include the measurement of vital signs such as heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate.

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The coming medical revolution

The coming medical revolution | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Technology has the potential to transform our concept of sickness

 

Digitizing the human: The evolving digital revolution can be used to change individual care and prevention, and even the economics of American healthcare.

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Monitoring Your Health With Mobile Devices

Monitoring Your Health With Mobile Devices | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Catch 22: Sometimes, it may seem like healthcare practitioners want to move patients along quickly and only scratch the surface of their personal needs.

(Have you ever felt that way about your doctor?)

 

Patients must be their own advocates and keep notes on their care, conditions and testing to ensure they get what they need. Throw dietary supplements into the mix and forget it—most traditional practitioners won’t even discuss them.

 

But when the patients take matters into their own hands-or smartphones- many doctors are skeptical.

 

So… does the doctor want the full responsibility or not?

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How Does Your Hospital Stack Up?

How Does Your Hospital Stack Up? | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Recently had or soon planning a procedure? Are you wondering how well the local hospitals have handled previous patients? Just need to find a convenient hospital for treatment?

 

This tool helps you find hospitals near you.

 

More importanly, it allows you to compare selected hospitals on factors such as:

--patient satisfaction

--accuracy of care

--readmission rates 

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Cost becomes bigger question in treating heart disease

Cost becomes bigger question in treating heart disease | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, accounting for one of every four deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

It also is very expensive. AHA estimates that annual U.S. medical costs of cardiovascular disease will reach $800 billion by 2030 - nearly triple the $272 billion spent in 2010.

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Healthcare — 5, 10, 20 years in the past and future | Singularity Hub

Healthcare — 5, 10, 20 years in the past and future | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Twenty years ago U.S. healthcare cost $2800, on average, per person. Ten years ago, that figure had risen to $4700 per person. And four years ago, in 2008, it was $7500 per person. (From exhibit 4A in this Kaiser Family Foundation Report.) Over the same period, the portion of Americans without insurance has risen. In 1990, 14.1 percent of Americans were uninsured. In 2000, 13.1 percent were uninsured.

 

Today, 16.3% of Americans are uninsured (approximately 50 million people), in part because of job losses and employers cutting back on coverage.

 

At the same time the number of uninsured has risen, there have been stunning innovations in healthcare

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Otis Brawley at TEDMED 2012 (video)

Some two-thirds of cancer are caused by lifestyle choices, says Otis Brawley, chief medical offer of the American Cancer Society.

 

But routine screening, which causes over-diagnosing, is not the answer.

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Cost of Aging Rising Rapidly

Cost of Aging Rising Rapidly | Longevity science | Scoop.it

"People worldwide are living three years longer than expected on average, pushing up the costs of aging by 50 percent, and governments and pension funds are ill prepared, the International Monetary Fund said.

 

Already the cost of caring for aging baby boomers is beginning to strain government budgets, particularly in advanced economies where by 2050 the elderly will match the numbers of workers almost one for one. The IMF study shows that the problem is global and that longevity is a bigger risk than thought.”

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Scripps Institute develops simple blood test to predict heart attacks and strokes

Scripps Institute develops simple blood test to predict heart attacks and strokes | Longevity science | Scoop.it

By detecting the presence of certain cells, a research study led by Scripps Translational Science Institute (STSI) has identified a new technique to predict an impending heart attack or stroke in advance.

 

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Obesity rates rise, threaten health in OECD nations

Obesity rates rise, threaten health in OECD nations | Longevity science | Scoop.it
LONDON (Reuters) - More people in developed countries are overweight or obese than ever before, dooming them to years of ill health, pushing up healthcare costs and piling more pressure on health systems,...

 

While obesity in some countries has stabilized, this is not true in the US and Canada. The cost is high. “Experts say severely obese people die on average eight to 10 years sooner than people at normal weight, with every 15 extra kg increasing risk of early death by around 30 percent.”

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