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How Machine Learning and Big Data Are Changing the Face of Biological Sciences

Until recently, the wet lab has been a crucial component of every biologist. Today's advances in the production of massive amounts of data and the creation of machine-learning algorithms for processing that data are changing the face of biological science—making it possible to do real science without a wet lab. David Heckerman shares several examples of how this transformation in the area of genomics is changing the pace of scientific breakthroughs.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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davidgibson's curator insight, May 28, 2013 11:05 PM

This 36 min video is well worth the time spent - to get an idea (hopefully a transferrable one) about Big Data and the frontiers of science. In this case both "wet lab" (test tubes microscopes) and "dry lab" (computer modeling with machine learning) and needed and so is content as well as computational literacy.

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How Genomics Is Changing Clinical Outcomes: Q&A with Heidi Rehm | New York Genome Center

How Genomics Is Changing Clinical Outcomes: Q&A with Heidi Rehm | New York Genome Center | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Heidi Rehm has been using disease-targeted gene panels to diagnose patients in her clinical molecular genetics practice for a decade. Having adopted next-generation sequencing approaches two years ago, and whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing for some patients in the past year, she is a pioneer in applying genomics in the clinic.


Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, February 12, 2013 11:36 PM

Very good discussion on the current impact that genetic and genomic sequencing are having on clinical decisions, and a look into the future when  genome analysis is much more cost effective.


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Complex Diseases Can Be Stopped: TEDMED David Agus (video)

Complex Diseases Can Be Stopped: TEDMED David Agus (video) | Longevity science | Scoop.it
We may not wholly understand complex diseases, but we can stop them, Agus says, with a preventive approach boosted by genomics, technology and a hard look at existing research data.
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Using cryptography, scientists have invented a new technique to decrypt eukaryotic genomes

Using cryptography, scientists have invented a new technique to decrypt eukaryotic genomes | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The main function of gene promoters appears to be the integration of different gene products in their biological pathways in order to maintain homeostasis. Generally, promoters have been classified in two major classes, namely TATA and CpG. Nevertheless, many genes using the same combinatorial formation of transcription factors have different gene expression patterns. Accordingly, a group of scientists has now tried to find some fundamental questions: Why certain genes have an overall predisposition for higher gene expression levels than others? What causes such a predisposition? Is there a structural relationship of these sequences in different tissues? Is there a strong phylogenetic relationship between promoters of closely related species?

 

In order to gain valuable insights into different promoter regions, they obtained a series of image-based patterns allowing the identificaion of 10 generic classes of promoters. A comprehensive analysis was undertaken for promoter sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiensand Oryza sativa, and a more extensive analysis of tissue-specific promoters in humans. The scientists observed a clear preference for these species to use certain classes of promoters for specific biological processes. Moreover, in humans, they found that different tissues use distinct classes of promoters, reflecting an emerging promoter network. Depending on the tissue type, comparisons made between these classes of promoters reveal a complementarity between their patterns whereas some other classes of promoters have been observed to occur in competition. Furthermore, they also noticed the existence of some transitional states between these classes of promoters that may explain certain evolutionary mechanisms, which suggest a possible predisposition for specific levels of gene expression and perhaps for a different number of factors responsible for triggering gene expression. They conclusions from all this are based on comprehensive data from three different databases and a new computer model whose core is using Kappa index of coincidence.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Genomics at your fingertips: DNA Sequencing in the Primary Care Office - The Doctor Weighs In

Genomics at your fingertips: DNA Sequencing in the Primary Care Office - The Doctor Weighs In | Longevity science | Scoop.it
RT @EricTopol: Genomics at Your Fingertips http://t.co/iehVcVfP by @drkevincampbell HT @cyphergenomics #CDoM

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Brian Shields's curator insight, February 9, 2013 2:17 AM

Interesting article on the possible future development of sequencing in the primary care office.  The article builds off a new technology reported by Anne Eisenberg in a recent NY Times article. This technology from a company called Knome, allows a single Lab or office to sequence a person's genome.  The technology costs about $125,000.

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GenomeTV: Biotech Video Collection and Lecture Series

GenomeTV: Biotech Video Collection and Lecture Series | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The Genomics in Medicine Lecture Series is sponsored by NHGRI, in collaboration with Suburban Hospital and Johns Hopkins. Each lecture takes place at Suburban Hospital's lower level auditorium at 8600 Old Georgetown Road in Bethesda, Md.

 

All are welcome to the hour-long lectures, which begin at 8 a.m. on the first Friday of the month, from December 2011 through June 2012.

 

Plus, check out the video collection for How-To Genome Sequencing and more.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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