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Your Next Doctor Could Save Your Life From Hundreds Of Miles Away

Your Next Doctor Could Save Your Life From Hundreds Of Miles Away | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Right now about 10 percent of ICU beds in the US are monitored in part from an off-hospital site. And the number of sites using remote monitoring are on the rise, increasing exponentially over the past 5 to 7 years.

 

Tele-ICU monitoring involves satellite-linked video and communications links to electronic records so that the distant intensivists – doctors that specialize in intensive care – can watch over the patient in real-time, 24 hours a day. A video camera operates on-demand to observe the patient and communicate with them via a microphone and speakers. Through this two-way communication tele-intensivists can aid local intensivists by helping to enforce the patient’s daily goals, review their performance with them and respond to alarms if the local doctor has been called away.

 

 

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Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone. It’s just the latest evidence that big data will have a profound impact on our health care system.

 

How much better? They claim a better than 50 percent reduction in costs and more than 40 percent better patient outcomes.

 

The idea behind the research, carried out by Casey Bennett and Kris Hauser, is simple and gets to the core of why so many people care so much about data in the first place: If doctors can consider what’s actually happening and likely to happen instead of relying on intuition, they should be able to make better decisions.

 

In order to prove out their hypothesis, the researchers worked with “clinical data, demographics and other information on over 6,700 patients who had major clinical depression diagnoses, of which about 65 to 70 percent had co-occurring chronic physical disorders like diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.” They built a model using Markov decision processes — which predict the probabilities of future events based on those immediately preceding them — and dynamic decision networks — which extend the Markov processes by considering the specific features of those events in order to determine the probabilities. Essentially, their model considers the specifics of a patient’s current state and then determines the best action to effect the best possible outcome.

 

Specifically, Bennett and Hauser found via a simulation of 500 random cases that their model decreased the cost per unit of outcome change to $189 from the $497 without it, an improvement of 58.5 percent. They found their original model improved patient outcomes by nearly 35 percent, but that tweaking a few parameters could bring that number to 41.9 percent.

 

IBM has been banging this drum loudly, most recently with two new commercial versions of its Watson system — one of which is designed to determine the best-possible course of treatment for lung cancer patient by analyzing their situations against a library of millions of pages of clinical evidence and medical research.

 

So, although we won’t hear “Paging Dr. Watson” at the hospital anytime soon, there’s an increasingly high chance our doctors will retire to their offices with our charts and ask a computer system of some sort what might be wrong with us and how they might best fix it.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Skip Stein's curator insight, February 12, 2013 8:28 AM

This is compounded by the fact that most of the illnesses in the study are direct results from poor/lousy nutrition.  Since doctors get little or no training in nutrition during all those years in medical school, the obvious solutions, the most natural and inexpensive ones are not even mentioned.  Plant based nutrition can help reduce the impact of many illnesses and in many cases totally reverse/cure the 'disease'.  Things like heart disease, diabetes 2, many cancers and a host of other ailments from depression, hypertension, high cholesterol and a plethora of others.

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Healthspot replaces doctor's office with a telepresence kiosk

Healthspot replaces doctor's office with a telepresence kiosk | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Telepresence physicians have been predicted since Hugo Gernsback foresaw the “radio doctor” in the 1920s. HealthSpot of Dublin, Ohio takes this idea a step further with its HealthSpot Station. It’s a telepresence kiosk that acts as an alternative to the traditional doctor’s office.

 

 

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Are e-visits as good as office appointments?

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new study suggests that e-visits for sinus infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs) may be cheaper than in-person office visits and similarly effective.For e-visits,...
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Telepresence Robots Invade Hospitals – “Doctors Can Be Anywhere, Anytime”

Telepresence Robots Invade Hospitals –  “Doctors Can Be Anywhere, Anytime” | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Imagine your doctor is 20 miles away, but is still able to assess you as a patient

 

The doctor can steer you down the hall, check your vitals, and talk to you. And, as long as there is a nurse on location, the doctor can check your heart beat over headphones.

 

Introducing Roda, a telepresence robot designed for hospital use.

 

 

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Patient safety efforts may prevent diagnostic errors

Electronic alerts and other technology-based aids may help prevent costly missed or delayed diagnoses, according to a new review of past evidence.

 

 

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Team Of Doctors Successfully Perform Double Arm Transplant On Veteran

Team Of Doctors Successfully Perform Double Arm Transplant On Veteran | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The most extensive bilateral arm transplant to date has been successfully achieved thanks to an interdisciplinary team of doctors and nurses at John Hopkins Hospital. The operation, which was performed on December 18, lasted 13 hours and involved 16 physicians from orthopedics, vascular medicine, plastic surgery, and other disciplines from five hospitals.

 

 

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Yearly payments to Canada's doctors exceeds $20B: report

Yearly payments to Canada's doctors exceeds $20B: report | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Canada's doctors are paid more than $20 billion overall a year, making physicians' services the third largest component of health-care spending after hospitals and drugs, a report released Tuesday says.
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Wearable ViSi Mobile System lets doctors wirelessly monitor patients

Wearable ViSi Mobile System lets doctors wirelessly monitor patients | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The ViSi Mobile vital signs monitor built by Sotera Wireless of San Diego, California. This wearable sensor pack uses Wi-Fi technology and is claimed to allow doctors using a tablet or smartphone to remotely monitor patient vital signs with the accuracy of an intensive care unit.

 

Designed around the concept of “monitoring in motion,” the ViSi Mobile consists of several units made of rugged, water-resistant plastic. These include a wrist unit with monitor readout, chest sensors, a blood pressure cuff monitor and a thumb sensor. These are connected to the existing hospital data infrastructure via Wi-Fi with WPA2 encryption for security.

 

 

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Paging Dr. Watson: IBM and Cleveland Clinic Collaborate to Train Watson in Medicine

Paging Dr. Watson: IBM and Cleveland Clinic Collaborate to Train Watson in Medicine | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Can you imagine telling someone a century ago that a hundred years hence a stack of electrified silicon would be studying for its medical exam?

 

IBM announced its question answering machine Watson will begin to study medicine.

 

The students and staff at the Cleveland Clinic will do for Watson what the rest of us do for Google—hone its answering accumen by using it. 

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