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Sunscreen is valuable, but different types produce different results

Sunscreen is valuable, but different types produce different results | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Physical or chemical sunscreen... Do you know the difference and the proper application?

 

Many of us find false comfort in high SPFs or do not reapply often enough to protect from free radicals.

 

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Common household chemical tied to heart disease risk: MedlinePlus

Common household chemical tied to heart disease risk: MedlinePlus | Longevity science | Scoop.it

People who had higher levels of a common synthetic chemical in their blood were more likely to have heart disease or have had a stroke, in a new U.S. study.

 

These are preliminary statistics and do not prove that the chemical causes heart disease, but the connection warrants a closer look.

 

 

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Yale study links common chemicals to osteoarthritis

Yale study links common chemicals to osteoarthritis | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new study just published in Environmental Health Perspectives, is the first to look at the associations between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), and osteoarthritis. This is a potentially huge discovery because these chemicals, (when referred to together, known as PFCs) are widespread in the environment and known to contaminate humans and wildlife. PFCs are used in more than 200 industrial processes and consumer products including grease-proof paper food containers, stain and water-resistant fabrics and personal care products.

"We found that PFOA and PFOS exposures are associated with higher prevalence of osteoarthritis, particularly in women, a group that is disproportionately impacted by this chronic disease," Sarah Uhl, who authored the study along with Yale Professor Michelle L. Bell and Tamarra James-Todd, an epidemiologist at the Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, said in a press statement.

 

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