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New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI

New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), investigators found that epithelial cells — the type that form a barrier between the inside and the outside of the body, such as skin cells — move in a group, propelled by forces both from within and from nearby cells — to fill any unfilled spaces they encounter.

 

The discovery about how cells move inside the body may provide scientists with crucial information about disease mechanisms such as the spread of cancer or the constriction of airways caused by asthma.

 

 

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Moving cells with light holds medical promise | KurzweilAI

Moving cells with light holds medical promise | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown they can coax cells to move toward a beam of light. The feat is a first step toward manipulating cells to control factors such as insulin secretion or heart rate using light.

 

Their research is published April 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

“We have succeeded in using light as a kind of on-off switch to control cells’ behavior,” says principal investigator N. Gautam, PhD, a professor of anesthesiology. “Much of the way cells behave is due to their ability to sense signals in the environment. In these experiments, what the cells sense is the presence of light.”

 

 

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"World's smallest wrench" is able to rotate individual cells

"World's smallest wrench" is able to rotate individual cells | Longevity science | Scoop.it

If you were a scientist looking at a cell with a microscope, what would you do if you wanted get a look at the far side of that cell? You could try reaching in with a very fine-tipped pair of tweezers, but ... you’d probably be better off using something known as a fiber-optic spanner.

 

 

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mdashf's curator insight, December 13, 2012 1:40 PM

the wrench .. hmm its called a wrenchie in Odia (obviously a borrowed word from English) there is a formula why ie is used for ee, ii, i, and y or yi etc

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Immortal worms defy aging | KurzweilAI

Immortal worms defy aging | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

How do they do it?

 

There are two types of worm that can regenerate their cells indefinitely, leading researchers to question—is this a key to immortality?

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Unwinding Nature's Clocks

Unwinding Nature's Clocks | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists at Duke will share a $14 million grant from DARPA to study biological clocks.

 

If scientists can isolate the genes, molecules and signals of human biological clocks, they could find ways to control and repair them if they are broken or damaged. A new DARPA grant will bring together many leading experts on the cell cycle, the circadian clock, the metabolism of yeast, root growth in plants and pulsing processes in bacteria, to deconstruct the molecular and genetic rhythms that keep these organisms alive. These scientists have four years to investigate the diverse rhythms of life.

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New imaging technology could reveal cellular secrets | KurzweilAI

New imaging technology could reveal cellular secrets | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

What causes a cell to metastasize into a cancerous tumor?

 

To find out, Corey Neu, an assistant professor in Purdue University‘s Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and colleagues have combined an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a nuclear magnetic resonance system.

 

An AFM uses a tiny vibrating probe called a cantilever with a tip that travels over the surface of a cell to yield information about materials and surfaces at the scale of nanometers, or billionths of a meter.

 

 

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Biological transistor enables computing within living cells | KurzweilAI

Biological transistor enables computing within living cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Stanford University bioengineers have taken computing beyond mechanics and electronics into the living realm of biology by creating the “transcriptor” — a biological transistor made from DNA and RNA.

In electronics, a transistor controls the flow of electrons along a circuit. Similarly, a transcriptor controls the flow of a specific protein, RNA polymerase, as it travels along a strand of DNA.

 

 

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The most complex synthetic biology circuit yet | KurzweilAI

The most complex synthetic biology circuit yet | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Synthetic biologists at MIT have developed a new sensor that can detect four different molecules. The complex circuit could be used to program cells to precisely monitor their environments.

 

 

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Can an aspirin a day keep cancer away? – - CNN.com Blogs

Can an aspirin a day keep cancer away? – - CNN.com Blogs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

"Aspirin is recognized for its effects in heart-attack prevention. And several studies 'have provided evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, may hold promise in helping to prevent cancer,'...

 

In particular, we show that aspirin reduces the likelihood that cancers will spread..."

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New Type of DNA Discovered? | The Scientist

New Type of DNA Discovered? | The Scientist | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A newly identified form of DNA—small circles of non-repetitive sequences—may be widespread in somatic cells of mice and humans, according to a study in this week’s issue of Science. These extrachromosomal bits of DNA, dubbed microDNA, may be the byproducts of microdeletions in chromosomes, meaning that cells all over the body may have their own constellation of missing pieces of DNA.

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