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Red meat tied to worse colon cancer outcomes: study

People who report eating the most red and processed meat before being diagnosed with colon cancer are more likely to die during the next eight years, according to a new study.

 

"It's another important reason to follow the guidelines to limit the intake of red and processed meat," said Marjorie McCullough, the study's lead author from the American Cancer Society in Atlanta.

 

 

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Upregulation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway i... [J Cell Biochem. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

"Results showed that curcumin induces growth arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Its effect was more obvious on the highly COX-2 expressing cell line..."

 

 

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Biotivia Longevity's curator insight, June 26, 2013 9:24 PM

Curcumin features a lot in research studies. Men with prostate concerns could look into adding curcumin to their diet. Curcumin is an active ingredient of the spice turmeric.

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Pluripotent cells from pancreatic cancer cells first human model of cancer's progression

Pluripotent cells from pancreatic cancer cells first human model of cancer's progression | Longevity science | Scoop.it

University of Pennsylvania scientists have used stem-cell technology to create a research cell line from a patient with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma(PDAC).

 

This first-of-its-kind human-cell model of pancreatic cancer progression was published this week in Cell Reports from the lab of Ken Zaret, PhD, professor of Cell and Developmental Biology.

 

"It is the first example using induced pluripotent stem [iPS] cells to model cancer progression directly from a solid tumor, and the first human cell line that can model pancreatic cancer progression from early to invasive stages," says Zaret, also the associate director of the Penn Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

 

 

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Vegetable fats tied to less prostate cancer spread

Vegetable fats tied to less prostate cancer spread | Longevity science | Scoop.it

After being diagnosed with prostate cancer, men who eat a diet high in vegetable fats, such as those in nuts and olive oil, may be less likely to have their disease spread, a new study suggests.

 

 

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‘Junk DNA’ plays active role in cancer progression, researchers find | KurzweilAI

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have found that a genetic rogue element produced by sequences until recently considered “junk DNA” could promote cancer progression.

 

The researchers, led by Dr Cristina Tufarelli, in the School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health Sciences, discovered that the presence of this faulty genetic element — known as chimeric transcript LCT13 — is associated with the switching off of a known tumor suppressor gene (known as TFPI-2) whose expression is required to prevent cancer invasion and metastasis. Their findings suggest that LCT13 may be involved in switching off TFPI-2.

 

 

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UK tries out new model for gene testing in cancer patients

UK tries out new model for gene testing in cancer patients | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Britain launched a research program on Monday that should eventually allow all cancer patients to have access to the kind of genetic analysis that led Hollywood star Angelina Jolie to decide to undergo a double mastectomy.

The project, involving the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in London, the U.S. gene sequencing firm Illumina, geneticists and cancer doctors, aims to find a way to allow more cancer genes be tested in more people.

 

 

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T-Cell Therapy Eradicates an Aggressive Leukemia in Two Children

T-Cell Therapy Eradicates an Aggressive Leukemia in Two Children | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Two children with an aggressive form of childhood leukemia had a complete remission of their disease—showing no evidence of cancer cells in their bodies—after treatment with a novel cell therapy that reprogrammed their immune cells to rapidly multiply and destroy leukemia cells. A research team from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania published the case report of two pediatric patients Online First today in The New England Journal of Medicine. It will appear in the April 18 print issue.

 

The current study builds on Grupp’s ongoing collaboration with Penn Medicine scientists who originally developed the modified T cells as a treatment for B-cell leukemias. The Penn team reported on early successful results of a trial using this cell therapy in three adult chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients in August of 2011. Two of those patients remain in remission more than 2½ years following their treatment, and as the Penn researchers reported in December 2012 at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology, seven out of ten adult patients treated at that point responded to the therapy. The team is led by the current study’s senior author, Carl H. June, M.D., the Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy in the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of Translational Research in Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center.

 

“We’re hopeful that our efforts to treat patients with these personalized cellular therapies will reduce or even replace the need for bone marrow transplants, which carry a high mortality risk and require long hospitalizations,” June said. “In the long run, if the treatment is effective in these late-stage patients, we would like to explore using it up front, and perhaps arrive at a point where leukemia can be treated without chemotherapy.”

 

The research team colleagues adapted the original CLL treatment to combat another B-cell leukemia: ALL, which is the most common childhood cancer. After decades of research, oncologists can currently cure 85 percent of children with ALL. Both children in the current study had a high-risk type of ALL that stubbornly resists conventional treatments.

The new study used a relatively new approach in cancer treatment: immunotherapy, which manipulates the immune system to increase its cancer-fighting capabilities. Here the researchers engineered T cells to selectively kill another type of immune cell called B cells, which had become cancerous.

 

The researchers removed some of each patient’s own T cells and modified them in the laboratory to create a type of CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) cell called a CTL019 cell. These cells are designed to attack a protein called CD19 that occurs only on the surface of certain B cells.

 

By creating an antibody that recognizes CD19 and then connecting that antibody to T cells, the researchers created in CTL019 cells a sort of guided missile that locks in on and kills B cells, thereby attacking B-cell leukemia. After being returned to the patient’s body, the CTL019 cells multiply a thousand times over and circulate throughout the body. Importantly, they persist for months afterward, guarding against a recurrence of this specific type of leukemia.

 

While the CTL019 cells eliminate leukemia, they also can generate an overactive immune response, called a cytokine release syndrome, involving dangerously high fever, low blood pressure, and other side effects. This complication was especially severe in Emily, and her hospital team needed to provide her with treatments that rapidly relieved the treatment-related symptoms by blunting the immune overresponse, while still preserving the modified T cells’ anti-leukemia activity.

 

“The comprehensive testing plan that we have put in place to study patients’ blood and bone marrow while they’re undergoing this therapy is allowing us to be able to follow how the T cells are behaving in patients in real time, and guides us to be able to design more detailed and specific experiments to answer critical questions that come up from our studies,” Kalos said.

 

The CTL019 therapy eliminates all B cells that carry the CD19 cell receptor: healthy cells as well as those with leukemia. Patients can live without B cells, although they require regular replacement infusions of immunoglobulin, which can be given at home, to perform the immune function normally provided by B cells.

 

The research team continues to refine their approach using this new technology and explore reasons why some patients may not respond to the therapy or may experience a recurrence of their disease. Grupp said the appearance of the CD19-negative leukemia cells in the second child may have resulted from her prior treatments. Unlike Emily, the second patient had received an umbilical cord cell transplant from a matched donor, so her engineered T cells were derived from her donor (transplanted) cells, with no additional side effects. Oncologists had previously treated her with blinatumomab, a monoclonal antibody, in hopes of fighting the cancer. The prior treatments may have selectively favored a population of CD19-negative T cells.

 

“The emergence of tumor cells that no longer contain the target protein suggests that in particular patients with high-risk ALL, we may need to broaden the treatment to include additional T cells that may go after additional targets,” added Grupp. “However, the initial results with this immune-based approach are encouraging, and may later even be developed into treatments for other types of cancer.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Soumya Rao's comment, May 1, 2013 5:17 AM
Wow... really amazing!!! Hope it transforms lives soon...
Nacho Vega's curator insight, May 1, 2013 1:58 PM

YES we CAN!!!

Nacho Vega's comment, May 1, 2013 2:02 PM
YES we CAN!
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Clinical trial first for less invasive procedure to treat prostate cancer

Clinical trial first for less invasive procedure to treat prostate cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Patient says he felt back to normal eight days after procedure and has no enduring side effects (Clinical trial first for less invasive procedure to treat prostate cancer: Patient says he felt back...
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New diagnostic technology may lead to individualized treatments for prostate cancer - Cedars-Sinai

NanoVelcro Chip device captures and isolates potentially high-risk cancer cells

Via Brian Shields
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Brian Shields's curator insight, April 14, 2013 11:02 AM

A great advancement may be on the horizon for the treatment of patients with Prostate Cancer.  The use of circulating tumor cells or "liquid biopsies" may prevent the need for painful and invasive procedures to obtain biopsy tissue.

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Cancer checkpoint: Mitochondrial metabolic regulator SIRT4 guards against DNA damage

Cancer checkpoint: Mitochondrial metabolic regulator SIRT4 guards against DNA damage | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Healthy cells don't just happen. As they grow and divide, they need checks and balances to ensure they function properly while adapting to changing conditions around them.

 

Researchers studying a set of proteins that regulate physiology, caloric restriction and aging have discovered another important role that one of them plays. SIRT4, one of seven sirtuin proteins, is known for controlling fuel usage from its post in the mitochondria, the cell's energy source. It responds to stressful changes in the availability of nutrients for the cell.

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Muscadinex's curator insight, April 8, 2013 6:29 PM

This is an interesting article on the SIRT4 gene. Resveratrol plays an important part in activating these cells longevity properties.

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High speed cancer-cell testing | KurzweilAI

High speed cancer-cell testing | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

Fast, precise, inexpensive cancer-cell testing device (credit: EPFL)

 

Among a significant percentage of patients, the risk of metastasis of cancer is particularly expressed by the presence of an abnormal amount of protein HER2 on the surface of cancer cells.

 

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 3, 2013 2:04 PM

A new diagnostic device has been developed that tests for the presence of a protein on the surface of cancer cells. The test can be done in just a few minutes compared to the current lengthy traditional method.

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Record gene haul points to better cancer screening

Record gene haul points to better cancer screening | Longevity science | Scoop.it

 

LONDON (Reuters) - New research has nearly doubled the number of genetic variations implicated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancer, offering fresh avenues for screening at-risk patients and, potentially, developing better drugs.

The bumper haul of 74 gene changes that can increase risks for the three hormone-related cancers, announced by scientists on Wednesday, is the result of the largest ever study of its kind.

 

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Carbon nanotube transistors designed to detect cancer biomarkers

Carbon nanotube transistors designed to detect cancer biomarkers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New technique could give conventional immunoassays a run for their money

 

Carbon-nanotube transistors could be used to detect minute quantities of disease biomarkers, such as the proteins implicated in prostate cancer, according to new experiments by researchers in the US. The technique could rival conventional methods when it comes to sensitivity, cost and speed.

 

Conventional techniques to detect proteins are typically based on some form of "immunoassay", with the most famous of these being enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This technique involves introducing an enzyme-modified antibody protein to an unknown amount of target molecule or protein, known as an antigen, and allowing them to bind together. Unreacted antibodies are washed away, leaving behind only antibody–antigen pairs.

 

The reaction can usually be detected by a colour change in the solution or by a fluorescent signal. The degree of colour change or fluorescence depends upon the number of enzyme-modified antibodies present, which in turn depends on the initial concentration of antigen in the sample.

 

Although such tests are routinely used in hospitals and clinics, they are quite long, taking several days or even weeks to complete. They are also costly, complicated to perform and can only detect single proteins at a time.

"Our new nanotube sensors are relatively simple compared to these ELISA tests," team member Mitchell Lerner, at the University of Pennsylvania, told physicsworld.com. "Detection occurs in just minutes, not days, and even at the laboratory scale, the cost of an array of 2000 such sensors is roughly $50 or 2.5 cents per sensor."

 

More importantly still, the sensors are much more sensitive to the target proteins in question. Indeed the Pennsylvania researchers showed that they could detect a prostate-cancer biomarker called osteopontin (OPN) at 1 pg/mL, which is roughly 1000 times lower than that possible with clinical ELISA measurements.


Detecting Lyme disease: The team, which is led by A T Charlie Johnson of Penn's Department of Physics and Astronomy, made its nanotube sensors by attaching OPN-binding antibodies to carbon-nanotube transistors on a silicon chip. Many proteins in the body bind very strongly to specific target molecules or proteins, and OPN is no exception. When the chip is immersed in a test sample, the OPN binds to the antibodies, something that changes the electronic characteristics of the transistor. Measuring the voltage and current through each device thus allows the researchers to accurately measure how much OPN there is in the sample.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rise in high-end treatment for low-risk prostate cancer

The proportion of U.S. men with early, slow-growing prostate cancer who received robotic surgery and other expensive treatments increased between 2004 and 2009, according to a new study.

 

Researchers found that use of those therapies also rose among men who were unlikely to die from prostate cancer because they were sick with other chronic diseases when their cancer was diagnosed.

 

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New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI

New discovery of the ways cells move could boost understanding of spread of cancer | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), investigators found that epithelial cells — the type that form a barrier between the inside and the outside of the body, such as skin cells — move in a group, propelled by forces both from within and from nearby cells — to fill any unfilled spaces they encounter.

 

The discovery about how cells move inside the body may provide scientists with crucial information about disease mechanisms such as the spread of cancer or the constriction of airways caused by asthma.

 

 

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Osteoporosis drug stops growth of breast cancer cells, even in resistant tumors, study suggests

Osteoporosis drug stops growth of breast cancer cells, even in resistant tumors, study suggests | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A drug approved in Europe to treat osteoporosis has now been shown to stop the growth of breast cancer cells, even in cancers that have become resistant to current targeted therapies, according to a Duke Cancer Institute study.

 

The findings, presented June 15, 2013, at the annual Endocrine Society meeting in San Francisco, indicate that the drug bazedoxifene packs a powerful one-two punch that not only prevents estrogen from fueling breast cancer cell growth, but also flags the estrogen receptor for destruction.

 

 

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Promising New Cancer Drugs Empower the Body’s Own Defense System

Promising New Cancer Drugs Empower the Body’s Own Defense System | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The early success of a new class of cancer drugs, revealed in test results released here over the last several days, has raised hope among the world’s top cancer specialists that they may be on the verge of an important milestone in the fight against the disease.

 

 

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Immunotherapy is not just for melanoma anymore

Diagnosed with advanced lung cancer over a year ago, Gabe Tartaglia was loath to undergo the kind of harsh chemotherapy that had devastated his sister before her death three years earlier from pancreatic cancer.

 

He decided to enter a clinical trial for a new drug designed to trigger the immune system to fight cancer. The results were better than anyone expected.

 

 

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A Natural Cancer Drug From Soggy Soybeans?

A Natural Cancer Drug From Soggy Soybeans? | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A four-hour bath could release powerful anti-cancer proteins locked inside the hull of normal soybeans. (A Natural Cancer Drug From Soggy Soybeans?
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ABDUL RAZAK MOHAMED SIKKANDER's curator insight, May 3, 2013 2:02 AM

what chemical composition present in soggy soyabeans to avoid cancer cells

 

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Scientists discover why a specific cancer drug is so effective | KurzweilAI

Scientists discover why a specific cancer drug is so effective | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists from the Manchester Collaborative Center for Inflammation Research (MCCIR) have discovered why a particular cancer drug is so effective at killing cells. Their findings could be used to aid the design of future cancer treatments.

Professor Daniel Davis and his team used high quality video imaging to investigate why the drug rituximab is so effective at killing cancerous B cells. It is widely used in the treatment of B cell malignancies, such as lymphoma and leukaemia — as well as in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

 

 

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Researchers Map the 3D Structure of the Telomerase Enzyme

Researchers Map the 3D Structure of the Telomerase Enzyme | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Researchers from UCLA and UC Berkeley have, for the first time ever, solved the puzzle of how the various components of an entire telomerase enzyme complex fit together and function in a three-dimensional structure.

 

The telomerase enzyme, which is known to play a significant role in aging and most cancers, represents a breakthrough that could open up a host of new approaches to fighting disease.

 

The creation of the first complete visual map of thetelomerase enzyme, which is known to play a significant role in aging and most cancers, represents a breakthrough that could open up a host of new approaches to fighting disease, the researchers said.

"Everyone in the field wants to know what telomerase looks like, and there it was. I was so excited, I could hardly breathe," said Juli Feigon, a UCLA professor of chemistry and biochemistry and a senior author of the study. "We were the first to see it."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Some drinking tied to longer life post-breast cancer

Women with breast cancer who had a few alcoholic drinks per week before their diagnosis were slightly less likely to die from their cancer, according to a study that followed newly-diagnosed patients for 11 years, on average.

Moderate drinking before and after a breast cancer diagnosis was also tied to better heart health and fewer deaths from non-cancer causes, the study team found.

 

 

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New cancer radiation therapy treatment with no harmful side effects

New cancer radiation therapy treatment with no harmful side effects | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Shortly after the discovery of the neutron in 1932, some scientists recognized the potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a cancer treatment. But despite decades of research, the problem of finding a delivery agent that would more effectively target the tumor without harming surrounding tissue persisted. Researchers at the University of Missouri (MU) may finally have found a solution.

 

BNCT traditionally involves injecting tumors with the non-radioactive boron-10 isotope capture agent that is then radiated with a beam of epithermal neutrons that interact with the capture agent to produce a biologically destructive nuclear caption reaction. This results in the formation of boron 11 with the release of lethal radiation in the form of alpha particles (helium-4) and lithium ions that kill the tumor. Although numerous clinical studies have demonstrated the safety of BNCT, the challenge has been finding more tumor-selective boron delivery agents.

 

 

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Thomas Jefferson University Researchers Discover New Pathways that Drive Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Thomas Jefferson University Researchers Discover New Pathways that Drive Metastatic Prostate Cancer | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Elevated levels of Cyclin D1b could function as a novel biomarker of lethal metastatic disease in prostate cancer patients, according to a pre-clinical study published ahead of print on December 21...Read the whole entry... »...

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Vitamin E anti-cancer mechanism mooted by researchers

The supposed anti-cancer effects of vitamin E have been long suggested. Now researchers believe they may have identified a key mechanism behind these properties.
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