Longevity science
77.2K views | +9 today
Follow
Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Vitamin E status may be reliable biomarker for Alzheimer’s: Study

Vitamin E status may be reliable biomarker for Alzheimer’s: Study | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Screening levels of vitamin E in the blood could help to improve the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to new research that suggests the vitamin may also aid in protection.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine
Scoop.it!

Researchers Identify Biomarker and Potential Therapy Target in MS ...

Researchers Identify Biomarker and Potential Therapy Target in MS ... | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers discover proteins in the IL-6 signaling pathway may be leveraged as novel biomarkers of multiple sclerosis (MS) to gauge disease activity and as a target for new therapies.


Via Brian Shields
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

'Heart resilience' biomarker may help predict chemotherapy-induced cardiac damage earlier

By using a blend of high definition cardiac imaging and biomarkers, Ohio State University cancer and heart researchers think they may have a way to catch early heart damage caused by anthracyclines, a class of chemotherapy drugs commonly used to treat breast and childhood cancers.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Biomarkers and Personalized Medicine
Scoop.it!

Potential Biomarker Emerging for Diabetic Neuropathy

Potential Biomarker Emerging for Diabetic Neuropathy | Longevity science | Scoop.it
An emerging biomarker may eventually lead to new approaches for treating diabetics at risk of developing nerve damage, UNSW researchers have found.

Via Brian Shields
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Carbon nanotube transistors designed to detect cancer biomarkers

Carbon nanotube transistors designed to detect cancer biomarkers | Longevity science | Scoop.it
New technique could give conventional immunoassays a run for their money

 

Carbon-nanotube transistors could be used to detect minute quantities of disease biomarkers, such as the proteins implicated in prostate cancer, according to new experiments by researchers in the US. The technique could rival conventional methods when it comes to sensitivity, cost and speed.

 

Conventional techniques to detect proteins are typically based on some form of "immunoassay", with the most famous of these being enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This technique involves introducing an enzyme-modified antibody protein to an unknown amount of target molecule or protein, known as an antigen, and allowing them to bind together. Unreacted antibodies are washed away, leaving behind only antibody–antigen pairs.

 

The reaction can usually be detected by a colour change in the solution or by a fluorescent signal. The degree of colour change or fluorescence depends upon the number of enzyme-modified antibodies present, which in turn depends on the initial concentration of antigen in the sample.

 

Although such tests are routinely used in hospitals and clinics, they are quite long, taking several days or even weeks to complete. They are also costly, complicated to perform and can only detect single proteins at a time.

"Our new nanotube sensors are relatively simple compared to these ELISA tests," team member Mitchell Lerner, at the University of Pennsylvania, told physicsworld.com. "Detection occurs in just minutes, not days, and even at the laboratory scale, the cost of an array of 2000 such sensors is roughly $50 or 2.5 cents per sensor."

 

More importantly still, the sensors are much more sensitive to the target proteins in question. Indeed the Pennsylvania researchers showed that they could detect a prostate-cancer biomarker called osteopontin (OPN) at 1 pg/mL, which is roughly 1000 times lower than that possible with clinical ELISA measurements.


Detecting Lyme disease: The team, which is led by A T Charlie Johnson of Penn's Department of Physics and Astronomy, made its nanotube sensors by attaching OPN-binding antibodies to carbon-nanotube transistors on a silicon chip. Many proteins in the body bind very strongly to specific target molecules or proteins, and OPN is no exception. When the chip is immersed in a test sample, the OPN binds to the antibodies, something that changes the electronic characteristics of the transistor. Measuring the voltage and current through each device thus allows the researchers to accurately measure how much OPN there is in the sample.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Biomarker Test Next Step for New Mesothelioma Drug

Biomarker Test Next Step for New Mesothelioma Drug | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A company that makes stem cell-focused treatments for cancer has taken an important step closer to testing a promising new mesothelioma drug.

The biopharmaceutical company Verastem, Inc. specializes in agents that destroy cancer by killing cancer stem cells.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Psychiatric News Alert: Inflammation Biomarker Linked to Depression

Psychiatric News Alert: Inflammation Biomarker Linked to Depression | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Ray and Terry's 's insight:


Elevated levels in a common blood test used to measure inflammation are associated with increased risk for psychological distress and depression, according to Danish researchers writing online December 24 in Archives of General Psychiatry. Their study looked at the medical records of 73,131 people in Copenhagen. Odds ratios of distress, use of antidepressants, and hospitalization for depression were about double that of the general population for people with CRP levels above the standard cutoff of 10 mg/L.

more...
No comment yet.