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The New Medicine: Hacking our biology to extend our lives- IEEE Spectrum

The New Medicine: Hacking our biology to extend our lives- IEEE Spectrum | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The New Medicine: Hacking Our Biology is part of the series “Engineers of the New Millennium” from IEEE Spectrum magazine and the Directorate for Engineering of the National Science Foundation.

 

These stories explore technological advances in medical inventions to enhance and extend life.

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How a Tiny Robot Could Check Your Health from Inside Your Body

How a Tiny Robot Could Check Your Health from Inside Your Body | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Tiny ‘Living’ Robot modeled after the parasitic lamprey is under development to monitor human health from within.


Its biologically-inspired design sets it apart from other tiny, health-monitoring robots under development.

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Artificial jellyfish created from rat heart tissue and silicone

Artificial jellyfish created from rat heart tissue and silicone | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Harvard University and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) looking to gain a better understanding of how biological pumps such as the heart work, have created an artificial jellyfish from rat heart muscle and silicon.

 

This is just neat biological science...

 

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The Plot Thickens: New Layer of Genetic Information Uncovered

The Plot Thickens: New Layer of Genetic Information Uncovered | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Scientists have long thought that part of our genetic code was redundant. Further, they thought that the redundant code contained only duplicate information. A new discovery indicates that the redundant bits contain unique and speed-related instructions for protein formation.


“By measuring the rate of protein production in bacteria, the team discovered that slight genetic alterations could have a dramatic effect. This was true even for seemingly insignificant genetic changes known as “silent mutations,” which swap out a single DNA letter without changing the ultimate gene product. To their surprise, the scientists found these changes can slow the protein production process to one-tenth of its normal speed or less.”


“This new discovery challenges half a century of fundamental assumptions in biology. It may also help speed up the industrial production of proteins, which is crucial for making biofuels and biological drugs used to treat many common diseases, ranging from diabetes to cancer.”

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