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Personalized bone substitutes created from skin cells | KurzweilAI

Personalized bone substitutes created from skin cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Patient-specific bone substitutes from skin cells for repair of large bone defects are now possible, thanks to research by a team of New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute scientists.

 

The study represents a major advance in personalized reconstructive treatments for patients with bone defects resulting from disease or trauma. It promises to lead to customizable, three-dimensional bone grafts on-demand, matched to fit the exact needs and immune profile of a patient.

 

 

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3ders.org - Australian researchers develop body parts using 3D printing | 3D Printer & 3D Printing News

3ders.org - Australian researchers develop body parts using 3D printing | 3D Printer & 3D Printing News | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Melbourne's St Vincent's Hospital is working on developing human organs by building body cells layer by layer using a 3D printer.

 

The team has used the 3D printer to make body cells, including muscle cells, nervous systems cells and cartilage. Professor Mark Cook, director of neurosciences at St Vincent's Hospital, said 3D body part printing was like 'bubble jet printers'.

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Sieg Holle's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:07 PM

Moores law at work -wow

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Bioteeth generated from your own cells | KurzweilAI

Bioteeth generated from your own cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers are developing a method to replace missing teeth with new bioengineered teeth generated from a person’s own gum cells.

Current implant-based methods of whole tooth replacement fail to reproduce a natural root structure and as a consequence of the friction from eating and other jaw movement, loss of jaw bone can occur around the implant.

Research towards producing bioengineered teeth (bioteeth) has largely focused on generating immature teeth (teeth primordia) that mimic those in the embryo that can be transplanted as small cell pellets into the adult jaw to develop into functional teeth, the researchers say.

 

 

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Gel inspired by mussels might act as filling putty for blood vessels

Gel inspired by mussels might act as filling putty for blood vessels | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Mussels have an amazing ability to cling to rocks, even when buffeted by large waves and ocean debris on a daily basis. Now, scientists have created a bioadhesive gel inspired by those mussels, that could potentially be used to reinforce weakened blood vessels.

The gel, which was developed by a team at MIT, is capable of withstanding the flow velocity of the human bloodstream. It is said to be similar to an amino acid present in the mussel’s byssus – this is a fibrous adhesive material that's stiff enough to keep the mollusk in place, yet stretchy enough to flex without snapping.
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Lab-grown brain tissue might lead to bioengineered implants

Lab-grown brain tissue might lead to bioengineered implants | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of researchers from MIT and Harvard Medical School have devised a cheap way of artificially growing three-dimensional brain tissues in the lab. Built layer by layer, the tissues can take on just about any shape and closely mimic the cellular composition of the tissue found in the living brain.

 

The advance could allow scientists to get a closer look at how neurons form connections, predict how cells of individual patients will respond to different drugs, and even lead to the creation of bioengineered implants to replace damaged brain tissue.

 

In recent years, we've seen big leaps forward in the technology we use to grow artificial bones, cartilage and blood vessels. As of late, scientists have even managed to grow biocompatible (though not naturalistic) brain tissue. One big hurdle remains, however: brain tissue contains thousands of different cell types, all intricately interconnected and present in varying concentrations in different areas of the brain, which is tough to recreate in the lab.

 

 

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The big question: "What is the future of human physical enhancement?" (Wired UK)

The big question: "What is the future of human physical enhancement?" (Wired UK) | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Wired talks to the experts about what to expect from the future of the human ability...

 

Aubrey de Grey
Chief science officer, SENS Foundation
"Medicine is distinct from human enhancement, but they may intersect. Somatic gene therapy will treat many diseases including the defeat of aging, but also allow such enhancements as skin luminescence. Tissue engineering may also allow us to have gills. The sky is the limit."

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The most complex synthetic biology circuit yet | KurzweilAI

The most complex synthetic biology circuit yet | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Synthetic biologists at MIT have developed a new sensor that can detect four different molecules. The complex circuit could be used to program cells to precisely monitor their environments.

 

 

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The New Medicine: Hacking our biology to extend our lives- IEEE Spectrum

The New Medicine: Hacking our biology to extend our lives- IEEE Spectrum | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The New Medicine: Hacking Our Biology is part of the series “Engineers of the New Millennium” from IEEE Spectrum magazine and the Directorate for Engineering of the National Science Foundation.

 

These stories explore technological advances in medical inventions to enhance and extend life.

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Weeding out problem stem cells for safer therapy | KurzweilAI

Weeding out problem stem cells for safer therapy | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Mayo Clinic researchers have found a way to detect and eliminate potentially troublemaking stem cells to make stem cell therapy safer.

 

Induced Pluripotent Stem cells, also known as iPS cells, are bioengineered from adult tissues to have properties of embryonic stem cells, which have the unlimited capacity to differentiate and grow into any desired types of cells, such as skin, brain, lung and heart cells.

 

 

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Light-activated skeletal muscle “blurs the boundary between nature and machines”

Light-activated skeletal muscle “blurs the boundary between nature and machines” | Longevity science | Scoop.it

MIT researchers have genetically engineered muscle cells to make them flex in response to laser light.

 

“With bio-inspired designs, biology is a metaphor, and robotics is the tool to make it happen'" says Professor Asada. "With bio-integrated designs, biology provides the materials, not just the metaphor. This is a new direction we’re pushing in biorobotics.”

 

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Scientists Create Sensor As Sensitive As Real Skin

Scientists Create Sensor As Sensitive As Real Skin | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While prosthetic limbs continue to improve, tactile feedback is one feature that many are keen to incorporate into the prosthetics but it remains a very difficult technology to develop. But now scientists have developed a new device so packed with sensors it is about as sensitive as human skin. Just as Moore’s Law continues to benefit the integrated circuit, packing ever more sensors into a smaller area will allow such devices to one day be built into everything we touch.

Some areas of our skin, like the lips and fingertips, are more sensitive to the touch because of a greater density of receptors that translate mechanical force into neuronal signals. The sensory device built by scientists at Georgia Tech is a new kind of transistor that converts mechanical force into electricity. The force bends nanoscale wires made of zinc oxide. When the wires bend back, zinc and oxide ions create an electrical potential that is converted to electrical current of a few millivolts. Converting mechanical energy to electrical energy is known as the piezoelectric effect.

 

 

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Designing interlocking building blocks to create complex tissues

Designing interlocking building blocks to create complex tissues | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a new "plug-and-play" method to assemble complex cell microenvironments that is a scalable, highly precise way to fabricate tissues with any spatial organization or interest -- such as those found in the heart or skeleton or vasculature.

 

The study reveals new ways to better mimic the enormous complexity of tissue development, regeneration, and disease, and is published in the March 4 Early Online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

 

 

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Devices aim to deliver on stem-cell therapies | KurzweilAI

Devices aim to deliver on stem-cell therapies | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Working with bioengineers and neurosurgeons, Daniel Lim, a neurosurgeon and stem-cell scientist at the University of California, San Francisco, has designed a needle that bends for for delivering stem cells to the brain,  Nature News reports.

The device can deposit cells anywhere within a 2-centimetre radius along a track, a volume bigger than an entire mouse brain.

 

 

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Biologists engineer algae to make complex anti-cancer ‘designer’ drug | KurzweilAI

Biologists engineer algae to make complex anti-cancer ‘designer’ drug | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Biologists at UC San Diego have succeeded in genetically engineering algae to produce a complex and expensive human therapeutic drug used to treat cancer.

Their achievement opens the door for making these and other “designer” proteins in larger quantities and much more cheaply than can now be made from mammalian cells.
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Cows used to produce milk that protects against HIV

Cows used to produce milk that protects against HIV | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Scientists have vaccinated pregnant cows, in order to get them to produce HIV-inhibiting antibodies in their milk.

 

Cows cannot contract HIV themselves. But they do produce antibodies in response to the invader. The milk that is first produced when a calf is born has a high level of antibodies (to protect the newborn from infection). This milk contained HIV antibodies when the cows were given HIV vaccines while pregnant.

 

If the scientists can formuilate a cream using this milk, it could be used to protect against the spread of HIV.

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How to create beating heart muscle cells | KurzweilAI

How to create beating heart muscle cells | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

UCLA stem-cell researchers have found for the first time a surprising and unexpected plasticity in the embryonic endothelium, the place where blood stem cells are made in early development.

 

They found that the lack of one transcription factor, a type of gene that controls cell fate (by regulating other genes), allows the precursors that normally generate blood stem and progenitor cells in blood-forming tissues to become something very unexpected — beating cardiomyocytes, or heart muscle cells.

 

 

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Woman’s Ear Regrown In Her Forearm | Singularity Hub

Woman’s Ear Regrown In Her Forearm | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Doctors at Johns Hopkins University were able to give a woman her ear back by first growing it beneath the skin of her forearm.

 

The doctors reconstructed an incomplete ear using the limited amount of skin she had left on her face and neck for reconstruction. The ear was then planted beneath the skin of her forearm.

 

Cartilage from Walter’s rib cage, and skin and arteries from other areas of her body were placed in her arm...

 

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Bi-Fi: New cell-to-cell communication process could revolutionize bioengineering

Bi-Fi: New cell-to-cell communication process could revolutionize bioengineering | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The internet has revolutionized global communications and now researchers at Standford University are looking to provide a similar boost to bioengineering with a new process dubbed “Bi-Fi.”

 

The technology uses an innocuous virus called M13 to increase the complexity and amount of information that can be sent from cell to cell. The researchers say the Bi-Fi could help bioengineers create complex, multicellular communities that work together to carry out important biological functions.

 

 

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‘Drag and Drop’ DNA Design | Singularity Hub

‘Drag and Drop’ DNA Design | Singularity Hub | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Imagine if DNA compilation was as easy to understand as Windows or iOS. Scientific study would no longer be necessary to engineer new combinations and just about anyone could drag and drop bits of genetic code into a workable sequence.

 

Amirav-Drory wants to create a graphic user interface to empower people in just this way.

 

His new software, Genome Compiler (free and available for download at www.genomecompiler.com), converts the various parts of a DNA sequence into easy-to-understand, and easily manipulable, icons.

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Lab-grown human blood vessels could help study diseases, grow tissues for transplant

Lab-grown human blood vessels could help study diseases, grow tissues for transplant | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A team of bioengineers at the University of Washington has developed the first structure for growing small human blood vessels in the laboratory. The vessels behave remarkably like those in a living human and offer a better and much more modular approach to studying blood-related diseases, testing drugs and, one day, growing human tissues for transplant.

The past year alone has brought remarkable advances in blood vessel regrowth in the human body...

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