Longevity science
75.3K views | +9 today
Follow
Longevity science
Live longer in good health and you will have a chance to extend your healthy life even further
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Piezoelectric skin provides human-like sense of touch

Piezoelectric skin provides human-like sense of touch | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For years now, scientists across the globe have strived to find a method that gives robots an accurate sense of touch, and with good reason. A robot with an improved ability to feel would be better equipped to identify objects, judge its movements with greater care, and perform more tasks overall. In the latest step towards that goal, researchers at Georgia Tech have crafted a new type of touch-reactive material that's sensitive enough to read fingerprints and could provide robots with a sense of touch that resembles our own.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

How to build a bionic man | KurzweilAI

How to build a bionic man | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Rex the bionic man shows how close technology is to catching up with — and exceeding — the abilities of the human body, The Guardian reports.

Housed within a frame of state-of-the-art prosthetic limbs is a functional heart-lung system, complete with artificial blood pumping through a network of pulsating modified-polymer arteries.

He has a bionic spleen to clean the blood, and an artificial pancreas to keep his blood sugar on the level.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Scientists Create Artificial Brain With 2.3 Million Simulated Neurons

Scientists Create Artificial Brain With 2.3 Million Simulated Neurons | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Another computer is setting its wits to perform human tasks. But this computer is different. Instead of the tour de force processing of Deep Blue or Watson’s four terabytes of facts of questionable utility, Spaun attempts to play by the same rules as the human brain to figure things out. Instead of the logical elegance of a CPU, Spaun’s computations are performed by 2.3 million simulated neurons configured in networks that resemble some of the brain’s own networks. It was given a series of tasks and performed pretty well, taking a significant step toward the creation of a simulated brain.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Exclusive: Ray Kurzweil Interview – The Future of Man And Machine

Exclusive: Ray Kurzweil Interview – The Future of Man And Machine | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Video: Singularity Hub’s recent interview with Ray Kurzweil

 

The interview with Kurzweil focused at first on his new book to be released November 13 “How to Create a Mind”, but then moved on to broader topics, such as Kurzweil’s more general thoughts on the future of man and machine, and Kurzweil’s personal goals for his work. The interview features a closeup, raw style.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ray and Terry's from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone. It’s just the latest evidence that big data will have a profound impact on our health care system.

 

How much better? They claim a better than 50 percent reduction in costs and more than 40 percent better patient outcomes.

 

The idea behind the research, carried out by Casey Bennett and Kris Hauser, is simple and gets to the core of why so many people care so much about data in the first place: If doctors can consider what’s actually happening and likely to happen instead of relying on intuition, they should be able to make better decisions.

 

In order to prove out their hypothesis, the researchers worked with “clinical data, demographics and other information on over 6,700 patients who had major clinical depression diagnoses, of which about 65 to 70 percent had co-occurring chronic physical disorders like diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.” They built a model using Markov decision processes — which predict the probabilities of future events based on those immediately preceding them — and dynamic decision networks — which extend the Markov processes by considering the specific features of those events in order to determine the probabilities. Essentially, their model considers the specifics of a patient’s current state and then determines the best action to effect the best possible outcome.

 

Specifically, Bennett and Hauser found via a simulation of 500 random cases that their model decreased the cost per unit of outcome change to $189 from the $497 without it, an improvement of 58.5 percent. They found their original model improved patient outcomes by nearly 35 percent, but that tweaking a few parameters could bring that number to 41.9 percent.

 

IBM has been banging this drum loudly, most recently with two new commercial versions of its Watson system — one of which is designed to determine the best-possible course of treatment for lung cancer patient by analyzing their situations against a library of millions of pages of clinical evidence and medical research.

 

So, although we won’t hear “Paging Dr. Watson” at the hospital anytime soon, there’s an increasingly high chance our doctors will retire to their offices with our charts and ask a computer system of some sort what might be wrong with us and how they might best fix it.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Skip Stein's curator insight, February 12, 2013 8:28 AM

This is compounded by the fact that most of the illnesses in the study are direct results from poor/lousy nutrition.  Since doctors get little or no training in nutrition during all those years in medical school, the obvious solutions, the most natural and inexpensive ones are not even mentioned.  Plant based nutrition can help reduce the impact of many illnesses and in many cases totally reverse/cure the 'disease'.  Things like heart disease, diabetes 2, many cancers and a host of other ailments from depression, hypertension, high cholesterol and a plethora of others.

Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

Advanced humanoid Roboy to be ‘born’ in nine months | KurzweilAI

Advanced humanoid Roboy to be ‘born’ in nine months | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it
Roboy (credit: Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, University of Zurich) Meet Roboy, one of the most advanced humanoid robots, say researchers at the
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ray and Terry's
Scoop.it!

IBM supercomputer used to simulate a typical human brain

IBM supercomputer used to simulate a typical human brain | Longevity science | Scoop.it

The human brain, arguably the most complex object in the known universe, is a truly remarkable power-saver: it can simultaneously gather thousands of sensory inputs, interpret them in real time as a whole and react appropriately, abstracting, learning, planning and inventing, all on a strict power budget of about 20 W. A computer of comparable complexity that uses current technology, according to IBM's own estimates, would drain about 100 MW of power.

 

Clearly, such power consumption would be highly impractical. The problem, then, begs for an entirely new approach. IBM's answer is cognitive computing, a newly coined discipline that combines the latest discoveries in the field of neuroscience, nanotechnology and supercomputing.

 

Neuroscience has taught us that the brain consumes little power mainly because it is "event-driven." In simple terms this means that individual neurons, synapses and axons only consume power as they are activated – e.g. by an external sensory input or other neurons – and consume no power otherwise. This is however not the case with today's computers, which, in comparison, are huge power wasters.

more...
No comment yet.