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Baby’s life saved with 3D printed device to restore breathing | KurzweilAI

Baby’s life saved with 3D printed device to restore breathing | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A bioresorbable splint used for first time, successfully stopped life-threatening tracheobronchomalacia, a case featured in New England Journal of Medicine.

 

Every day, a baby, Kaiba, stopped breathing, his collapsed bronchus blocking the crucial flow of air to his lungs. Parents April and Bryan Gionfriddo watched helplessly.

 

 

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Unique droplet network 3D printer produces synthetic tissues

Unique droplet network 3D printer produces synthetic tissues | Longevity science | Scoop.it

While the prospect of 3D printers pumping out biological tissues and replacement organs has many justifiably excited, researchers at Oxford University have gone in a slightly different direction with the creation of a custom 3D printer capable of producing synthetic materials that have some of the properties of living tissues.

 

Rather than being intended for supplying spare parts for damaged replicants, the new materials could be used for drug delivery or replacing or interfacing with damaged tissues inside the human body.

 

 

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3D-printing human embryonic stem cells for drug testing, future replacement of human organs | KurzweilAI

3D-printing human embryonic stem cells for drug testing, future replacement of human organs | KurzweilAI | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A new 3D printing process using human stem cells could pave the way to custom replacement organs for patients, eliminating the need for organ donation and immune suppression, and solving the problem of transplant rejection.

 

The process, developed at Edinburgh-based Heriot-Watt University, in partnership with Roslin Cellab, could also speed up and improve the process of reliable, animal-free drug testing by growing three-dimensional human tissues and structures for pharmaceuticals to be tested on.

 

 

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Estibaliz Undiano Hernandez's curator insight, November 17, 2013 7:22 AM

Mediante este pequeño artículo me gustaría destacar la importancia de las nuevas técnicas tecnológicas. Es una manera de ir sustituyendo poco a poco la experimentación animal en la ciencia. La técnica que aquí se describe es además sencilla y no produce riesgo alguno para la salud.

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Cell-powered "bio-bots" get a wriggle on

Cell-powered "bio-bots" get a wriggle on | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Using a 3D printer, researchers at the University of Illinois have developed synthetic "bio-bots" about seven millimeters long that are powered by embedded cardiac cells that give them the ability to "walk" on their own.

 

The researchers say they are just scratching the surface of what is possible, with their work potentially leading to millimeter-scale medical or environmental sensors that that can seek out and neutralize harmful toxins.

 

The bio-bots, which are made primarily out of a flexible hydrogel, move using a long leg that acts like a flagellum. The leg is coated with heart cells from the common rat so that when the cells beat, they cause the leg to swing, thrusting the robot forward.

 

 

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You are your own donor: paving the way for 3D-printed biological tissues

You are your own donor: paving the way for 3D-printed biological tissues | Longevity science | Scoop.it
A new approach to medical 3D printing is set to speed up the production of body-parts.

 

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to print three-dimensional blood vessels in seconds. If the technique proves scalable, it could revolutionize regenerative medicine.

 

Imagine being able to recover from a heart attack by replacing your faulty aortic valve with a brand new one, made of your own cells...

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Joel Finkle's curator insight, January 7, 5:13 PM

Printable blood vessels - that could be useful for coronary bypass, and basic structure of printing replacement organs.  There's a lot of hand-waving about using your own cells (where do they come from, what stem cell processes?), but the potential is there.

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How 3D Printing The Human Body Works [Infographic]

How 3D Printing The Human Body Works [Infographic] | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Imagine for a second that you are suffering from some kind of liver illness that reduces your liver function to 10%. In order to recuperate, you would need a liver transplant or another fix that increases your liver’s function. In the future, that could be entirely possible thanks to 3D printing.

 

As a matter of fact, scientists and engineers all say that it won’t be long before we can print custom made full organs to replace the non-functioning ones.

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3ders.org - Australian researchers develop body parts using 3D printing | 3D Printer & 3D Printing News

3ders.org - Australian researchers develop body parts using 3D printing | 3D Printer & 3D Printing News | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Researchers at Melbourne's St Vincent's Hospital is working on developing human organs by building body cells layer by layer using a 3D printer.

 

The team has used the 3D printer to make body cells, including muscle cells, nervous systems cells and cartilage. Professor Mark Cook, director of neurosciences at St Vincent's Hospital, said 3D body part printing was like 'bubble jet printers'.

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Sieg Holle's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:07 PM

Moores law at work -wow

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Scientists print human embryonic stem cells on 3D printer

Scientists print human embryonic stem cells on 3D printer | Longevity science | Scoop.it

For the first time, scientists have printed human embryonic stem cells using a 3D printer.

 

Using stem cells as a form of ink, the Heriot-Watt University team led by Dr Will Wenmiao Shu think they will soon be able to print human tissue.

Bioengineer Alan Faulkner-Jones built the printer using parts from an old 3D printer. It uses a valve-based technique to deposit whole life cells onto a surface.

 

The team printed tiny droplets of bio ink, each containing up to five cells from an embryonic human kidney and an embryonic cell line.

 

Ninety-nine percent of cells tested were alive and viable for replication. "It's accurate enough to produce 3D micro-tissue." said Dr Shu.

 

"The printed cells can still maintain their potency, which is their ability to differentiate into any other cell types in our body."

  

That differentiation occurs when the stem cells are combined with nascent cells from specific organs, like the liver or lungs, which emit chemical signals to transform the stem cells into liver or lung tissue.

 

Dr Shu's team want to produce human liver tissue by 2015 and build individual organs with their stem cell printer soon after. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Inexpensive home-brewed prostheses created using 3D printers

Inexpensive home-brewed prostheses created using 3D printers | Longevity science | Scoop.it

When Ivan Owen from Washington State posted a video of his handmade mechanical hand prop on YouTube, little did he expect that he would be contacted by Richard Van As, a South African amputee and fellow craftsman living 10,000 miles away. Together, they designed and built a working prosthetic finger for Richard that we covered last October. After raising money to build more prototypes, the two went on to complete an entire prosthetic hand for a young boy named Liam who was born without fingers on his right hand, the design of which they are sharing online free of charge.

 

 

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New At The Dentist: 3D Printing “Dental Crowns While You Wait”

New At The Dentist: 3D Printing “Dental Crowns While You Wait” | Longevity science | Scoop.it

If you have ever had a dental crow, you know that the whole ordeal takes time. You have impressions made, a temporary cap, and a wait while the lab produces your permanent crown. 

 

But wait- there is an solution to make the whole procedure more efficient.

 

A new system is being used by a handful of dentists to scan patients’ teeth and create crowns for them while they wait. A process that normally takes two weeks, now only takes an hour.

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3D printed robotic exoskeleton gives young girl a helping hand

3D printed robotic exoskeleton gives young girl a helping hand | Longevity science | Scoop.it

A two year old girl born with arthrogryposis, a congenital disease that left her unable to lift her own arms, although able to walk, has been given a new lease on life by a 3D printed robotic exoskeleton, enabling her to move freely for the very first time.

 

 

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3D printer technology used to produce customized drugs

3D printer technology used to produce customized drugs | Longevity science | Scoop.it

Efforts to create customised medicines using 3D printer-based technology are being developed in Glasgow. Researchers have used a £1,250 system to create a range of organic compounds and inorganic clusters - some of which are used to create cancer treatments.

 

Longer term, the scientists say the process could be used to make customised medicines. It is predicted that this technique will be used by pharmaceutical firms within five years, and by the public within 20.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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