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Small sponge-like implant 'traps' spreading cancer cells

Small sponge-like implant 'traps' spreading cancer cells | Longevity News | Scoop.it

A small sponge-like implant that can mop up cancer cells as they move through the body has been developed by US researchers.

So far tested in mice, it is hoped the device could act as an early warning system in patients, alerting doctors to cancer spread. The implant also seemed to stop rogue cancer cells reaching other areas where new tumours could grow.

The findings appear in Nature Communications .

About 5mm (0.2in) in diameter and made of a "biomaterial" already approved for use in medical devices, the implant has so far been tested in mice with breast cancer. Experiments showed that implanting the device in either the abdominal fat or under the skin sucked up cancer cells that had started to circulate in the body.

The implant mimicked a process where cells broken loose from a tumour were attracted to other areas in the body by immune cells, the researchers said. They found that these immune cells set up camp on the implant - a natural reaction to any foreign body - drawing the cancer cells in.

Initially, the researchers "labelled" cancer cells so they would light up and be easily spotted. But they then moved on to a special imaging technique that can distinguish between cancerous and normal cells, and found they could detect cancer cells that had been caught in the implant.

Unexpectedly, when they measured cancer cells that had spread in mice with and without the implant, they found that the device not only captured cancer cells, it reduced the numbers present at other sites.

Researchers have long been looking for ways to detect the spread - or metastasis - of cancer at an early stage, but cancer cells that circulate in the bloodstream are rare and hard to detect.

Study leader Prof. Lonnie Shea, from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan, said they were planning the first clinical trials in humans fairly soon. "We need to see if metastatic cells will show up in the implant in humans like they did in the mice, and also if it's a safe procedure and that we can use the same imaging to detect cancer cells," he said.

He said they were continuing work in animals to see what happened to the overall outcome if cancer spread was detected at a very early stage - something which was not yet fully understood. Lucy Holmes, Cancer Research UK's science information manager, said: "We urgently need new ways to stop cancer in its tracks. "So far this implant approach has only been tested in mice, but it's encouraging to see these results, which could one day play a role in stopping cancer spread in patients."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Planarian regeneration model discovered by AI algorithm

Planarian regeneration model discovered by AI algorithm | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“An artificial intelligence system has for the first time reverse-engineered the regeneration mechanism of planaria — the small worms whose extraordinary power to regrow body parts has made them a research model in human regenerative medicine.The discovery by Tufts University biologists presents the first model of regeneration discovered by a non-human intelligence and the first comprehensive model of planarian regeneration, which had eluded human scientists for more than 100 years. The work, published in the June 4 issue of PLOS Computational Biology (open access), demonstrates how “robot science” can help human scientists in the future.To bioengineer complex organs, scientists need to understand the mechanisms by which those shapes are normally produced by the living organism.However, there’s a significant knowledge gap between the molecular genetic components needed to produce a particular organism shape and understanding how to generate that particular complex shape in the correct size, shape and orientation, said the paper’s senior author, Michael Levin, Ph.D., Vannevar Bush professor of biology and director of the Tufts Center for Regenerative and Developmental Biology.“Most regenerative models today derived from genetic experiments are arrow diagrams, showing which gene regulates which other gene. That’s fine, but it doesn’t tell you what the ultimate shape will be. You cannot tell if the outcome of many genetic pathway models will look like a tree, an octopus or a human,” said Levin.“Most models show some necessary components for the process to happen, but not what dynamics are sufficient to produce the shape, step by step. What we need are algorithmic or constructive models, which you could follow precisely and there would be no mystery or uncertainty. You follow the recipe and out comes the shape.””
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Josep M Torra Colom's curator insight, June 6, 2015 5:53 AM

añada su visión ...

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The AI Revolution: Our Immortality or Extinction | Wait But Why

The AI Revolution: Our Immortality or Extinction | Wait But Why | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Superintelligent AI is either going to be a dream or a nightmare for us, and there's not really any in-between.”
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How To Live Longer: Scientists Are Pushing To Make 120 The New 70

How To Live Longer: Scientists Are Pushing To Make 120 The New 70 | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“But what scientists are less sure of is whether those extra decades of life will also result in a higher quality of life.”
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Immortality: PayPal Billionaire Seeks to Defy Death - Guardian Liberty Voice

Immortality: PayPal Billionaire Seeks to Defy Death - Guardian Liberty Voice | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Not satisfied with the trappings of life that $2.2 billion affords, PayPal founder, Peter Thiel, seeks to defy death in the quest for immortality.”
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Lithium for Life Extension? - h+ Magazine

Lithium for Life Extension? - h+ Magazine | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Communities with naturally-occurring lithium in their drinking water enjoy greater longevity.”
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Immortal jellyfish: Does it really live forever?

Immortal jellyfish: Does it really live forever? | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“The Turritopsis nutricula jellyfish has displayed a remarkable ability to regenerate its cells in times of crisis.”
While it is often joked that cats have nine lives, a certain species of jellyfish has been deemed “immortal” by scientists who have observed its ability to, when in crisis, revert its cells to their earliest form and grow anew. That means that these tiny creatures, 4 mm to 5 mm long, potentially have infinite lives.
The creature, known scientifically as Turritopsis nutricula, was discovered in the Mediterranean Sea in 1883, but its unique regeneration was not known until the mid-1990s. How does the process work? If a mature Turritopsis is threatened — injured or starving, for example — it attaches itself to a surface in warm ocean waters and converts into a blob. From that state, its cells undergo transdifferentiation, in which the cells essentially transform into different types of cells. Muscle cells can become sperm or eggs, or nerve cells can change into muscle cells, “revealing a transformation potential unparalleled in the animal kingdom,” according to the original study of the species published in 1996.
But Turritopsis can — and do — die. Their regeneration only occurs after sexual maturation, therefore they can succumb to predators or disease in the polyp stage. But because the jellyfish are the only known animal with this “immortality,” scientists are studying them closely, with the hopes of applying what they learn to issues such as human aging and illness.
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Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | KurzweilAI

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | KurzweilAI | Longevity News | Scoop.it
Obese vs. lean mouse (credit: Wikimedia Commons) Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that engineered probiotic bacteria (“friendly”
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Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance | Longevity News | Scoop.it
Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that engineered probiotic bacteria (“friendly” bacteria like those in yogurt) in the gut produce a therapeutic compound that inhibits weight gain, insulin resistance, and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice.“Of course it’s hard to speculate from mouse to human,” said senior investigator Sean Davies, Ph.D., assistant professor of Pharmacology. “But essentially, we’ve prevented most of the negative consequences of obesity in mice, even though they’re eating a high-fat diet.”The findings published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation (open access) suggest that it may be possible to manipulate the bacterial residents of the gut — the gut microbiota — to treat obesity and other chronic diseases.Davies has a long-standing interest in using probiotic bacteria to deliver drugs to the gut in a sustained manner, in order to eliminate the daily drug regimens associated with chronic diseases. In 2007, he received a National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award to develop and test the idea.Other studies have demonstrated that the natural gut microbiota plays a role in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “The types of bacteria you have in your gut influence your risk for chronic diseases,” Davies said. “We wondered if we could manipulate the gut microbiota in a way that would promote health.”To start, the team needed a safe bacterial strain that colonizes the human gut. They selected E. coli Nissle 1917, which has been used as a probiotic treatment for diarrhea since its discovery nearly 100 years ago.They genetically modified the E. coli Nissle strain to produce a lipid compound called N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)*, which is normally synthesized in the small intestine in response to feeding. NAPE is rapidly converted to NAE, a compound that reduces both food intake and weight gain. Some evidence suggests that NAPE production may be reduced in individuals eating a high-fat diet.“NAPE seemed like a great compound to try — since it’s something that the host normally produces,” Davies said.The investigators added the NAPE-producing bacteria to the drinking water of mice eating a high-fat diet for eight weeks. Mice that received the modified bacteria had dramatically lower food intake, body fat, insulin resistance and fatty liver compared to mice receiving control bacteria.They found that these protective effects persisted for at least four weeks after the NAPE-producing bacteria were removed from the drinking water. And even 12 weeks after the modified bacteria were removed, the treated mice still had much lower body weight and body fat compared to the control mice. Active bacteria no longer persisted after about six weeks.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Deborah Verran's comment, July 26, 2014 10:31 AM
NB This research was performed in mice. The value of probiotics as for eg in some manufactured brands of yoghurt remains to be seen.
Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, July 27, 2014 7:39 AM

The term biofortification is often applied to the nutritional enhancement of crops via selective breeding or genetic modification. I felt that term was suitable for describing the genetic enhancement of probiotics as these bacteria confer nutritional benefits and are often incorporated into functional foods.

 

I also find this technology fascinating because it much simpler and than other comparable therapies such as a bionic pancrease http://sco.lt/6W8BuL

 

Functional foods are another topic which interest me and more scoops on the topic can be read here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/food-health-and-nutrition/?tag=Functional+Foods

 

Pierre-André Marechal's curator insight, July 28, 2014 12:23 PM

A vos commentaires...  PAM

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New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment.”The test, called the cMethDNA assay, accurately detected the presence of cancer DNA in the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancers up to 95 percent of the time in laboratory studies. The findings were described in the April 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research.Currently, there is no useful laboratory test to monitor patients with early stage breast cancer who are doing well, but could have an asymptomatic recurrence, says Saraswati Sukumar, Ph.D., who is the Barbara B. Rubenstein Professor of Oncology and co-director of the Breast Cancer Program at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.Generally, radiologic scans and standard blood tests are indicated only if a woman complains of symptoms, such as bone aches, shortness of breath, pain, or worrisome clinical exam findings. Otherwise, routine blood tests or scans in asymptomatic patients often produce false positives, leading to additional unnecessary tests and biopsies, and have not been shown to improve survival outcomes in patients with early stage breast cancer who develop a recurrence.Sukumar, also a professor of pathology at Johns Hopkins, says that the current approach to monitoring for recurrence is not ideal, and that "the goal is to develop a test that could be administered routinely to alert the physician and patient as soon as possible of a return of the original cancer in a distant spot. With the development of cMethDNA, we've taken a first big step toward achieving this goal."To design the test, Sukumar and her team scanned the genomes of primary breast cancer patients, as well as DNA from the blood of metastatic cancer patients. They selected 10 genes specifically altered in breast cancers, including newly identified genetic markers AKR1B1, COL6A2, GPX7, HIST1H3C, HOX B4, RASGRF2, as well as TM6SF1, RASSF1, ARHGEF7, and TMEFF2, which Sukumar's team had previously linked to primary breast cancer.The test, developed by Sukumar, collaborator Mary Jo Fackler, Ph.D., and other scientists, detects so-called hypermethyation, a type of chemical tag in one or more of the breast cancer-specific genes present in tumor DNA and detectable in cancer patients' blood samples. Hypermethylation often silences genes that keep runaway cell growth in check, and its appearance in the DNA of breast cancer-related genes shed into the blood indicates that cancer has returned or spread.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NASA Supercomputer Simulation Shows Neutron Stars Ripping Each Other Apart to Form a Black Hole

NASA Supercomputer Simulation Shows Neutron Stars Ripping Each Other Apart to Form a Black Hole | Longevity News | Scoop.it
A newly released video from NASA shows a pair of neutron stars colliding and ripping each other apart to form a black hole.

This supercomputer simulation shows one of the most violent events in the universe: a pair of neutron stars colliding, merging and forming a black hole. A neutron star i
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Is This How We'll Cure Cancer?

Is This How We'll Cure Cancer? | Longevity News | Scoop.it
With a radical new treatment, Joseph Jimenez is dedicating Novartis to one overarching mission: vanquishing mankind's ancient adversary. Its breakthrough might be the most tangible... ever.
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Roadmap to Immortality: Genetic, Regenerative Medicine, and Digital - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

Roadmap to Immortality: Genetic, Regenerative Medicine, and Digital - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Roadmap to Immortality: Genetic, Regenerative Medicine, and Digital Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies We have created the Human Physical Immortality Roadmap to persuade people that radical life extension is possible within our lifetime.”
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Parsley - Life Extension

Parsley - Life Extension | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Parsley is now recognized as a superfood with an array of potent nutrition dividends. The volatile oils and flavonoids in parsley deliver potent antimicrobial and anticancer benefits, act as a diuretic, and even protect against vision loss.”
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Nearly indestructible virus yields tool to treat diseases

Nearly indestructible virus yields tool to treat diseases | Longevity News | Scoop.it
By unlocking the secrets of a bizarre virus that survives in nearly boiling acid, scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have found a blueprint for battling human disease using DNA clad in near-indestructible armor. "What's interesting and unusual is being able to see how proteins and DNA can be put together in a way that's absolutely stable under the harshest conditions imaginable," said Edward H. Egelman, PhD, of the UVA Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics. "We've discovered what appears to be a basic mechanism of resistance - to heat, to desiccation, to ultraviolet radiation. And knowing that, then, we can go in many different directions, including developing ways to package DNA for gene therapy."The virus SIRV2 belongs to a common crenarchaeal virus family, the Rudiviridae. It was first discovered in 1998 in the hot acidic sulfurous springs of Iceland. According to previous studies, SIRV2 infects Sulfolobus islandicus, a single-celled microorganism that grows optimally at 80 degrees Celsius and at pH 3. The virus has a very stable rod-shaped viral capsule, about 900 nm long and 23 nm in width.Now, Dr Prangishvili, Dr Egelman and their colleagues have used cryo-electron microscopy to generate a 3D reconstruction of the SIRV2 virion, which revealed a previously unknown form of virion organization.The team identified surprising similarities between SIRV2 and the spores bacteria form to survive in inhospitable environments.“Some of these spores are responsible for very, very horrific diseases that are hard to treat, like anthrax. So we show in this study that this virus actually functions in a similar way to some of the proteins present in bacterial spores,” said Dr Egeleman, who is the senior author on the paper published in the journal Science. “Understanding how these bacterial spores work gives us potentially new abilities to destroy them,” he said.Dr Egeleman and co-authors also found that SIRV2 survives the inhospitable conditions by forcing its DNA into what is called A-form, a structural state identified by pioneering DNA researcher Rosalind Franklin more than a half-century ago.“This is, I think, going to highlight once again the contributions she made, because many people have felt that this A-form of DNA is only found in the laboratory under very non-biological conditions, when DNA is dehydrated or dry. Instead, it appears to be a general mechanism in biology for protecting DNA,” Dr Egelman said.
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15 Tips That Help You Live to Be 100

15 Tips That Help You Live to Be 100 | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Since we all get older every year, it raises an important question: "What should I be doing if I want to continue my annual renewal and stay healthy so I can continue to enjoy the journey?"...”
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The state of life extension science: a physicist’s thoughts on how soon.

The state of life extension science: a physicist’s thoughts on how soon. | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“RT @TheTranshuman: The state of life extension science: a physicist’s thoughts on how soon. http://t.co/MpMXX82InO http://t.co/LlilZl513p”;
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The Current State of Machine Intelligence

The Current State of Machine Intelligence | Longevity News | Scoop.it
A few years ago, investors and startups were chasing “big data”. Now we’re seeing a similar explosion of companies calling themselves artificial intelligence, machine learning, or collectively “machine intelligence”. The Bloomberg Beta fund, which is focused on the future of work, has been investing in these approaches.Computers are learning to think, read, and write. They’re also picking up human sensory function, with the ability to see and hear (arguably to touch, taste, and smell, though those have been of a lesser focus).Machine intelligence technologies cut across a vast array of problem types (from classification and clustering to natural language processing and computer vision) and methods (from support vector machines to deep belief networks). All of these technologies are reflected on this landscape.What this landscape doesn’t include, however important, is “big data” technologies. Some have used this term interchangeably with machine learning and artificial intelligence, but I want to focus on the intelligence methods rather than data, storage, and computation pieces of the puzzle for this landscape (though of course data technologies enable machine intelligence).We’ve seen a few great articles recently outlining why machine intelligence is experiencing a resurgence, documenting the enabling factors of this resurgence. Kevin Kelly, for example chalks it up to cheap parallel computing, large datasets, and better algorithms.Machine intelligence is enabling applications we already expect like automated assistants (Siri), adorable robots (Jibo), and identifying people in images (like the highly effective but unfortunately named DeepFace). However, it’s also doing the unexpected: protecting children from sex trafficking, reducing the chemical content in the lettuce we eat, helping us buy shoes online that fit our feet precisely, anddestroying 80's classic video games.
Big companies have a disproportionate advantage, especially those that build consumer products. The giants in search (Google, Baidu), social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest), content (Netflix, Yahoo!), mobile (Apple) and e-commerce (Amazon) are in an incredible position. They have massive datasets and constant consumer interactions that enable tight feedback loops for their algorithms (and these factors combine to create powerful network effects) — and they have the most to gain from the low hanging fruit that machine intelligence bears.
Best-in-class personalization and recommendation algorithms have enabled these companies’ success (it’s both impressive and disconcerting that Facebook recommends you add the person you had a crush on in college and Netflix tees up that perfect guilty pleasure sitcom).
Now they are all competing in a new battlefield: the move to mobile. Winning mobile will require lots of machine intelligence: state of the art natural language interfaces (like Apple’s Siri), visual search (like Amazon’s “FireFly”), and dynamic question answering technology that tells you the answer instead of providing a menu of links (all of the search companies are wrestling with this).Large enterprise companies (IBM and Microsoft) have also made incredible strides in the field, though they don’t have the same human-facing requirements so are focusing their attention more on knowledge representation tasks on large industry datasets, like IBM Watson’s application to assist doctors with diagnoses.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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John Vollenbroek's curator insight, April 25, 2015 2:53 AM

I like this overview

pbernardon's curator insight, April 26, 2015 2:33 AM

Une infographie et une cartographie claire et très intéressante sur l'intelligence artificielle et les usages induits que les organisations vont devoir s'approprier.

 

#bigdata 

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Melatonin: New Research Shows Impressive Health Benefits - Life Extension

Melatonin: New Research Shows Impressive Health Benefits - Life Extension | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“ New research indicates that melatonin does much more than help some people sleep better. Exciting studies show that melatonin’s multifaceted effects may improve treatment outcomes in cancer patients and extend their lives.”
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TRAP-1 knock-out mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related diseases

TRAP-1 knock-out mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related diseases | Longevity News | Scoop.it
While developing a new cancer drug, researchers at The Wistar Institute discovered that mice lacking a specific protein live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses. The mice, which lack the TRAP-1 protein, demonstrated less age-related tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation when compared with normal mice. Their findings could change how scientists view the metabolic networks within cells.In healthy cells, TRAP-1 is an important regulator of metabolism and has been shown to regulate energy production in mitochondria, organelles that generate chemically useful energy for the cell. In the mitochondria of cancer cells, TRAP-1 is universally overproduced. The Wistar team’s report, which appears in the journal Cell Reports (available online now), shows how “knockout” mice bred to lack the TRAP-1 protein compensate for this loss by switching to alternative cellular mechanisms for making energy.“We see this astounding change in TRAP-1 knockout mice, where they show fewer signs of aging and are less likely to develop cancers,” said Dario C. Altieri. M.D., Robert and Penny Fox Distinguished Professor and director of The Wistar Institute’s National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Center. “Our findings provide an unexpected explanation for how TRAP-1 and related proteins regulate metabolism within our cells.”“We usually link the reprogramming of metabolic pathways with human diseases, such as cancer,” Altieri said. “What we didn’t expect to see were healthier mice with fewer tumors.”Altieri and his colleagues created the TRAP-1 knockout mice as part of their ongoing investigation into their novel drug, Gamitrinib, which targets the protein in the mitochondria of tumor cells. TRAP-1 is a member of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) family, which are “chaperone” proteins that guide the physical formation of other proteins and serve a regulatory function within mitochondria. Tumors use HSP90 proteins, like TRAP-1, to help survive therapeutic attack. “In tumors, the loss of TRAP-1 is devastating, triggering a host of catastrophic defects, including metabolic problems that ultimately result in the death of the tumor cells,” Altieri said. “Mice that lack TRAP-1 from the start, however, have three weeks in the womb to compensate for the loss of the protein.”The researchers found that in their knockout mice, the loss of TRAP-1 causes mitochondrial proteins to misfold, which then triggers a compensatory response that causes cells to consume more oxygen and metabolize more sugar. This causes mitochondria in knockout mice to produce deregulated levels of ATP, the chemical used as an energy source to power all the everyday molecular reactions that allow a cell to function.
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9 Obvious Steps to Immortality - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

9 Obvious Steps to Immortality - Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“9 Obvious Steps to Immortality Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies Maria Konovalenko discusses personalized medicine services, why you should participate in clinical trials of geroprotector drug candidates, Personalized science, Why...”
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Salk: One single injection of FGF1 stops type-2 diabetes in its tracks for 2 days

Salk: One single injection of FGF1 stops type-2 diabetes in its tracks for 2 days | Longevity News | Scoop.it
In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. The discovery by Salk scientists, published today in the journal Nature, could lead to a new generation of safer, more effective diabetes drugs.The team found that sustained treatment with the protein doesn't merely keep blood sugar under control, but also reverses insulin insensitivity, the underlying physiological cause of diabetes. Equally exciting, the newly developed treatment doesn't result in side effects common to most current diabetes treatments.Controlling glucose is a dominant problem in our society," says Ronald M. Evans, director of Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory and corresponding author of the paper. "And FGF1 offers a new method to control glucose in a powerful and unexpected way."Type 2 diabetes, which can be brought on by excess weight and inactivity, has skyrocketed over the past few decades in the United States and around the world. Almost 30 million Americans are estimated to have the disease, where glucose builds up in the bloodstream because not enough sugar-carting insulin is produced or because cells have become insulin-resistant, ignoring signals to absorb sugar. As a chronic disease, diabetes can cause serious health problems and has no specific cure. Rather it is managed—with varying levels of success—through a combination of diet, exercise and pharmaceuticals.In 2012, Evans and his colleagues discovered that a long-ignored growth factor had a hidden function: it helps the body respond to insulin. Unexpectedly, mice lacking the growth factor, called FGF1, quickly develop diabetes when placed on a high-fat diet, a finding suggesting that FGF1 played a key role in managing blood glucose levels. This led the researchers to wonder whether providing extra FGF1 to diabetic mice could affect symptoms of the disease.Evans' team injected doses of FGF1 into obese mice with diabetes to assess the protein's potential impact on metabolism. Researchers were stunned by what happened: they found that with a single dose, blood sugar levels quickly dropped to normal levels in all the diabetic mice."Many previous studies that injected FGF1 showed no effect on healthy mice," says Michael Downes, a senior staff scientist and co-corresponding author of the new work. "However, when we injected it into a diabetic mouse, we saw a dramatic improvement in glucose."
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Autodesk Builds Its Own Real Virus, Based on Systems Biology

Autodesk Builds Its Own Real Virus, Based on Systems Biology | Longevity News | Scoop.it
Autodesk, a company which develops design software, produced a synthetic Phi-X174 bacteriophage, a virus that infects E. coli bacteria but is totally benign for humans. The effort was a sort of scientific homage to the work of the J. Craig Venter Institute, which first produced the self-replicating synthetic virus back in 2003, following a more than five-year research effort. In Autodesk’s case, it took a little more than two weeks and about $1,000.That achievement says a lot about how far the science of synthetic biology has come — and a lot about where Autodesk is going.
Via Marko Dolinar, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Samuel Viana's curator insight, May 23, 2014 12:56 PM
A AutoDesk, criadora do software de modelação AutoCAD, criou o seu primeiro vírus. Mas não é um vírus informático, como à primeira vista possa parecer, mas sim biológico, já que a Autodesk também se lançou neste campo de pesquisa já lá vão dez anos. Este vírus é capaz de infectar a "clássica" bactéria-modelo E. coli.
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Magnetars --Creation of the Most Awesome Magnets in the Cosmos Solved

Magnetars --Creation of the Most Awesome Magnets in the Cosmos Solved | Longevity News | Scoop.it
Magnetars are the bizarre super-dense remnants of supernova explosions. They are the strongest magnets known in the Universe — millions of times more powerful than the strongest magnets on Earth. A team of European astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope...
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Secret to longevity revealed - Times of India

Secret to longevity revealed - Times of India | Longevity News | Scoop.it
“Times of India Secret to longevity revealed Times of India ... weight lived longer than people who were underweight.”
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