Ecological sustainable development of environment - Logging
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Ecological sustainable development of environment - Logging
This 'Scoop.it!' site provides resources and information on logging from a number of different perspectives. Along with the resources are also lesson ideas, links with numeracy and literacy, and helpful links to pedagogical research for support.
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Why Trees?

Follow along as this lecture doodle examines some of the basic reasons why trees are important not just for their beauty but also for their contributions to ...
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Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 9:29 AM
Description
This video introduces the importance of trees from many different perspectives in an engaging and illustrative way. The narrator talks about the many benefits of trees including economical, physical, environmental etc. Although it is spoken from a South American perspective, it is easily relatable to Australian climates.

Teaching Idea
Outcome – ENS3.5 and ENS 3.6
This lesson allows students to see how students from different parts of town or with different family backgrounds may value their gardens/trees. It also allows students to make connections in regards to the environment they live in and other parts of the world (particularly America) and how there are similarities. It also demonstrates their understanding of how to act in an ecological responsible manner in relation to tree planting.
After students watch this video, hold a class discussion of the importance of trees in their own local areas. This may be different depending on the location of the students so asking students to talk about specific areas will allow insight for other students. Brainstorm important points from the video and students ideas of the benefits of trees.
This lesson would be an introduction to logging as it ensures students realize the importance of trees and forests.
Students will then create a picture of their local neighborhood labeling trees in the area and their purposes. In a different colour to the rest of the trees, students will draw where they think other trees should go and why it would be beneficial to the local environment. Students then present their drawings to the class and talk about their local neighbourhoods.
To prepare for next lesson ask the students to think about the implications if these trees were to be taken down.

Assessment Idea
Students will be assessed on their drawings and reasoning for current trees and additional trees.

Literacy/Numeracy Strategies
- Explore words in the text that students might not understand, ie. erosion, ultra violet rays. Start a glossary on the board or on a large piece of paper of words relation to forests and logging. Continue glossary throughout unit of work.

Pedagogical research
Incorporating the arts into this lesson helps to create a more authentic and deeper learning experience for the introduction to the topic. This task engages a number of ‘skills and abilities’ and ‘nurtures the development of cognitive, social, personal competencies’ (Fiske, 1999) by having the students watch and listen to a clip and create their own artwork, reflecting on what they’ve heard and considering their own personal environments. By incorporating an oral presentation into the conclusion of the lesson encourages development of students ability to effectively portray their ideas to their listeners and vice versa, referred to by McLaughlin (2006) as ‘communicative competence’.

Friske, E. B. (1999). Champions of change : the impact of arts on learning. The arts education partnership. Washington : the president’s committee on arts and humanities.

McLaughlin, S. (2006). Introduction to language development (2nd Ed). Clifton Park : Thomson Delmar Learning
Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 9:59 PM
Lesson 1
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Australia outlaws illegally-logged wood from abroad

Australia outlaws illegally-logged wood from abroad | Ecological sustainable development of environment - Logging | Scoop.it
In another blow to illegal loggers, Australia has passed the Illegal Logging Prohibition Bill, joining the U.S. in outlawing the importation of illegal logged timber from abroad.
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Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 10:22 AM
Description
This resource is a report from a website that concentrates on rainforests all over the world, providing a global perspective on illegal logging. The report, from November 2012, is about Australia outlawing importation of illegally logged wood and wood products. The report talks about other countries involved in this movement and the effect it can have on the illegal logging industry, and the positive effects on the environment and even the economy.

Teaching Idea
Outcome ENS3.5 and ENS3.6
Students explore how logging affects different people all over the world and how perspectives might be different between local and global levels.
Direct a shared reading session with students, stopping along the way to discuss any new words. Ask students to think about the effects of logging (positive and negative).
Individually, students produce a mind map of the effects of logging and categorise them into:
- Local
- State
- National
- Global
In partners, students share and collaborate their ideas and organise them into table including positive and negative (provide table with headings if necessary).
Provide print outs from other helpful websites:
http://www.illegal-logging.info/item_single.php?it_id=1684&it=new
In pairs, students read the hand outs and answer some reflective questions and discuss with the class:
- If there are so many negative effects of logging, why aren’t more countries passing laws such as these?
- Why might some cultures think that illegal logging is ok?

Assessment Idea
Students understanding will be assessed on their participation in class discussion and their completion of the table showing the effects of logging at different levels.

Literacy/Numeracy
- Students will partake in shared reading out loud when asked and independent reading when reading additional handouts.
- Use some of the numbers throughout the text to put the volume of numbers perspective for children. For example, if you earn $500 a week, how long would it take you to pay off a $55000 dollar fine? Work these out with the students. Do this for different numbers throughout the text.

Pedagogical research
The ‘think, pair, share’ strategy used in this lesson is a technique used to promote ‘cooperative learning’ (McInernery & McInerney, 2010). Not only is cooperative learning suggested to ‘effectively manage students,’ and ‘improve academic achievements’, it also has other non-cognitive benefits for the learner (McInerney & McInerney). These benefits include increased positive attitudes in a number of areas including towards themselves, towards learning and towards their peers. Incorporating cooperative learning in lessons is an effective way of broadening students learning outcomes in a manageable way.

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology : constructing learning (5th Ed). Classroom management and cooperative group work for effective learning. (pp. 201-284). Frenchs Forest : Pearson Australia
Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 10:00 PM
Lesson 4
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History

History | Ecological sustainable development of environment - Logging | Scoop.it
Site history, including indigenous and european, through to the present day
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Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 8:42 AM
Description
This resource provides a brief history of the settlement of the Europeans and development of the Inner city of Sydney. Although the text is interesting, for the purpose of this lesson the pictures shown on this website show a great comparison. The lithograph shows the greenery of the area in 1823 while a recent photo shows the high rises, Centre Point Tower, over all a very highly developed city. Although the lithograph isn’t specifically titled as to what area it is, it will be useful for the purpose of this lesson.

Teaching Idea
Outcome ENS3.6
This lesson allows students to explore different perspectives of one issue. It also shows how different beliefs and backgrounds influence the way people value their environment with the contrast of Indigenous Australians to the European settlers, wanting to use the land for different purposes.
Show students large copies of each of these picture. Discuss the type of destruction and resources that has gone into the development of the city.
Split the class into two groups. One group will be the Europeans at the time of settlement who wanted to clear the area to create a town of buildings, roads, etc. The other group will be the Indigenous Australians who have been living in Australia for thousands of years and have developed an efficient and fulfilling lifestyle – they do not want the Europeans to destroy their land.
You as the teacher will take a walk down ‘conscience alley’. The students will stand in a line with their team, facing the opposition. As you walk down the middle of them one student from the European side will voice one point of their argument, followed by one point from the Indigenous people’s side. Teams take in turn until you reach the end of the alley and make your decision (will the clearing of the land go ahead, or not)
Allow the student’s time to research their side of the debate. Encourage students to use resources and pieces of work used already for logging.
As a follow up or continuing activity, students will write an argument on the topic at hand, providing views from both sides using the different learning experiences from previous lessons on logging.

Assessment Idea
Students will be assessed on their interaction in the group work, their participation in conscience alley and the production of the written argument. The written argument will be a good assessment for the whole topic.

Literacy/Numeracy Strategies
- Students learn the skills of researching to compile information, in this case, to form an argument.
- The glossary should be further added to with words of interest.

Pedagogical Research
Drama ‘has the power to engage all learning styles’, (Ashton-Hay, 2005). Conscience alley creates a debate-type environment, with opposing teams, but all students are required to participate, not only the 8 speakers as in a debate situation. This helps to promote a ‘content-rich learning environment’ (Healy, 2004) as both teams research indepth and present their sides of the debate. Working in large groups, (half the class each group) motivates ‘contexts for communication’ (Healy) which is a fundamental skill for learning.

Ashton-Hay, S. (2005). Drama : Engaging all learning styles. Proceedings 9th international INGED (Turkish English Education Association Conference, 1-19. Retrieved 23rd April 2013 from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/12261/1/12261a.pdf

Healy, C. (2004). Drama in education for language learning. Humanising language teaching. Retrieved 23rd April 2013 from http://www.hltmag.co.uk/sept04/mart7.htm
Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 9:59 PM
Lesson 5
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Illegal logging

Illegal logging | Ecological sustainable development of environment - Logging | Scoop.it
Increasing demand for timber, paper and packaging drives illegal logging, which destroys wildlife, damages communities and distorts trade.
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Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 8:47 AM
Description
This World Wildlife Fund resource provides information about logging from a global perspective. By exploring this website, teachers can identify key learning points in relation to illegal logging around the world, identifying the causes/reasons for illegal logging in an easy to read and accessible format. There are other links on the page to provide further information on forests, deforestation, and forests conservation which are all relevant to logging. The website shows a map of where illegal logging occurs around the world. This resource is a good introduction to logging and is one that students can use for themselves due to the simple lay out and language

Teaching Idea
Outcome - ENS 3.5
Students explore why logging occurs and how Australians can act to decrease effects of logging.
Students explore this website and in small groups, create a summary of the important information used. Prior to this lesson, students are asked to explore their homes to find products made out of wood, and if possible, where they came from and compile a list. Students are asked to explore the classroom and do the same.
With a print out of the map provided on the WWF website, students will match and mark where the products came from.
Ask students to write a report about a chosen timber/wooden item. Students should have access to the internet for this report. Have key questions ready for students who need to answer in their report:
- What is the product and what is it used for?
- Where does the product come from?
- Is the country that the product comes from highly involved with illegal logging?
- What might happen to these areas after many years of illegal logging?
- Why do people illegally log wood?
- How can Australia help to prevent illegal logging in other countries?

Assessment Idea
Students will be assessed on the final report in which they have created as a group. Monitor involvement of individuals throughout this project to ensure all students are benefiting from the learning experience.

Literacy/Numeracy Strategy
- Students build report writing and research skills
- Students need to look at the percentage of illegal logging in each country to determine whether the country’s logging is predominately illegal.

Pedagogical Research
Providing questions to assist students with writing their report can be seen as ‘scaffolding’ or ‘prompts’ (McInerney and McInerney, 2010). These tools are used when students are ‘having difficulty... to extend learners understanding ‘. To differentiate in the classroom, these prompts should only be offered to those who may experience difficulty. Vygotsky, cited in McInerney and McInerney, believed that learning occurs when students are challenged ‘beyond their current level of development’, removing these prompts may help to achieve this learning.


McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology : constructing learning (5th Ed). Special needs and effective learning. (pp. 285-326). Frenchs Forest : Pearson Australia
Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 9:59 PM
Lesson 2
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Deforestation Affects on Animals: text, images, music, video | Glogster EDU - 21st century multimedia tool for educators, teachers and students

Deforestation Affects on Animals: text, images, music, video | Glogster EDU - 21st century multimedia tool for educators, teachers and students | Ecological sustainable development of environment - Logging | Scoop.it
See the Glog! Deforestation Affects on Animals: text, images, music, video | Glogster EDU - 21st century multimedia tool for educators, teachers and students
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Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 8:45 AM
Description
This resource is a child-friendly website that talks about the effect of logging/deforestation on animals around the world. When introducing this website it is important that students are made aware of the close relationship between logging and deforestation.

Teaching Idea
Outcome ENS3.6
This lesson helps students to recognise the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments by putting into perspective the amount of plants and animals that could be potentially affected by logging in their local areas.
After introducing the term deforestation, students will be given time to explore the website. (or the website text can be printed out as a handout to student.) As a class, go through the interesting point and statistics found on the website.
If accessible, students go on an excursion to a local park/grassed or forest area, if not possible, the school grounds will be sufficient. Working in small groups, students conduct an audit of the animals and plants found in the area. Students should write names and descriptions for the living things found. If possible, take photos to print off for the classroom. Encourage students to think about other animals that might live in the area that wouldn’t be seen at the certain time of the day/year, or with people around to help them realise how many animals may live in said area. If possible, provide students with a plant encyclopaedia/information book to help identify plants they found.
Students will create a table of the animals and plants they found with columns titled. The table should include a small picture of the animal (drawn), name of plant/animal, distinct features, importance to the environment, implications to environment if species were extinct/endangered.
When complete, ask students to answer reflective questions such as:
- How many species of flora and fauna did you find?
- If this is the number of plants and animals in such a small area, how many do you think area at risk all over the world?

Assessment Idea
Students will be assessed on the table they produce and the participation in audit.

Literacy/Numeracy
- Students link words and pictures together, learn names and spelling of flora and fauna.
- Create a number of word problems in relation to the figures involved with their audit to help them recognise the scale of such a problem worldwide.

Pedagogical research
Tables are a helpful way of organising information in a simple, easy to access way. Tables also teach students ‘to think in a comparative way’ (Petty, 2009). For this activity it helps to compare the different flora and fauna found and their affects on the environment. To help some students, Petty suggests using tables as a ‘scaffolding’ tool. For example, you could provide a part completed table with the name and description of the animals already complete.


Petty, G. (2009). Evidence- based teaching : a practical approach 2nd ed. Cheltenham : Nelson Thornes Ltd
Lucinda Hopkins's comment, April 24, 2013 10:00 PM
Lesson 3