Location Is Everywhere
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Countries as Named in Their Own Languages

Countries as Named in Their Own Languages | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A map of the world’s endonyms.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's interesting to see these maps for a number of reasons. First, names are important. I have had so many people mispronounce my name, sometimes daily, including when I am presented at conferences or other important events. Your name is part of the essence of who you are, your ancestry and roots. I cringe at commentators when I'm watching sport on TV or even at the match. The greats used to not only practice pronouncing names right, they used to go and ask them. The same seems to me to be important with our origins. In this case the title might better be called exonyms, rather than endonyms. I don't say I was born in the Koninkrijk der Nederlanden. I would either say Holland (which is in fact two states of Nederland. I have heard people say the Commonwealth of Australia in formal speeches, but if you were to ask an Aussie, they would say they are from Australia. I love the concept of the map, but to be true endonyms, tell us what the man in the street calls their country, That's what they connect to, that's their homeland. As to using other alphabets that I can't read, it would be nice to have the Roman lettering equivalent, I think that could be done together like a Tokyo street sign without being disrespectful. Cool concept though:)
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Uber's food service is coming to Melbourne

Uber's food service is coming to Melbourne | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

stUber is set to launch its food deliver service in Melbourne as early as next month, despite its ridesharing service still being deemed illegal in Victoria.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Uber is a wild card that in my opinion is changing industries that:
1. Wouldn't be threatened if they had come up with similar ideas as service innovation in the first place. Perhaps they are guilty of not being in touch with their customers.
2. Are well placed to compete given they currently own the customers and by acknowledging that the app and map model customers have embraced, they like could easily be provided by the incumbents.
3. Are so mired in thinking they control how customers should be treated, they feel through unions or other means, they can dictate what services should be limited to.

I don't understand why any city would not want a ride share system of any sort (besides the fact that services like food delivery, including bundling products from different restaurants, such as is common in tourist towns, has been normal business for years).

In many cities around the world, we have too many cars and we are trying to encourage ride sharing and reduced numbers of single occupancy vehicles, especially during peak travel times. Surely any service not funded by tax and rate payers that helps meet those goals must be beneficial. If customers don't like the new services, they won't use them. The better the transport services available , the less likely that younger people will feel the need to buy cars at all.

 

If Uber drivers and their vehicles are subject to the same licensing and qualification requirements as their legacy equivalents, then scare tactics don't make sense. Of course we shouldn't by default assume that current technologies should be continued, because they are the incumbent. In New Zealand electronic hubometers are normal on trucks, digital driver logbooks are replacing paper, improving accuracy and saving time and Uber's map concept and GPS systems stop cab drivers from bidding for jobs by saying they are somewhere much closer to the customer than they really are.

 

If we stubbornly stuck to old rules, we would still require a flag marshal to walk in front of every car to warn pedestrians that there is a vehicle coming as they did in London a little over a hundred years ago, when they said there should never be another fatality caused by a motor vehicle.

One thing I don't fully understand is why Uber is coming up with names for each of their services. Is it a launch strategy? Is it a plan to be able to try new services and abandon them if they fail? A competitive strategy to compete with other rapid rise start-ups? We have
Uber
UberX
UberXL
UberSelect
UberPool
UberFood
UberBlack
UberAssist
UberSUV and I'm sure there are more. I guess before too long it could be Uber Alles.

Anyway, bottom line, I am all for innovation. If Uber drivers have to conform to the same legal requirements as any other service provider, then lets have at it. Maybe we can even find ways to embrace their services with others, like the last mile add-ons to public transport services we are seeing piloted in parts of Germany and the Netherlands.

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Facebook Is Making a Map of Everyone in the World

Facebook Is Making a Map of Everyone in the World | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
And they’re using a brand new A.I. technique and a whole lot of computing power to do it.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Just have a think about what you posted on your Facebook account since you first started. Now think about what you told your Government on your national Census, which is once every few years. Who did you give more data to? What's the point of the data? Facebook want to sell it. What does that mean in your country? This is gold for town planners, transport planners and so much more. If I was to want to open a big plant, I could easily find out where I wold be most likely to find the workers I need, close to the population types I need, close to the markets or transport hubs I want to move them around to. If I wanted to open up a music studio for Christian Death Metal bands, a few dollars on my Facebook account would probably find me the perfect location i the world. If I wanted to set up a dealership for electric cars, I'd be able to find the cities where people are most likely to buy them, not just because of population density, other transport problems, local cost of living, fuel costs etc, but because people in that area care enough about their environment and there is a high enough density of people buying cars. When you start talking about the data Facebook have about about their 1.31 Billion active users, this is the biggest database goldmine in history. The question is who will get access to it at what cost. What information can good data scientists and business analysts glean, when location is brought into the loop, even when individual people's names are not provided. Pretty much anything you want to know. What can it be used for? By law abiding citizens looking to build a better world and life for themselves, their friends, family and country, and by benevolent democratic governments, immense good can be achieved. In the hands of dictators, of non-democratic Governments, of criminals, the information could be equally powerful. Want to shut down communities of people who do not think the way we want them to, find them by investing a few thousand dollars with Facebook. Want to find out which communities have lots of valuable artifacts where a high percentage of people are away overseas on holiday in March. That will be there too. All you will have to do is ask the right questions. So my question is, given that we have surrendered privacy and most of the people I know, did that because we are law abiding and don't have anything to hide and we live in a country of freedom of speech and belief. But I don't remember any governance about what can be done with our data. Who is the guardian and how do we ensure it is only being used for benevolent purposes? Or is it like climate change seems to be heading? Too little too late?
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BMW tests car-sharing service in Seattle, taking on Car2Go in first U.S. move since halting S.F. pilot - GeekWire

BMW tests car-sharing service in Seattle, taking on Car2Go in first U.S. move since halting S.F. pilot - GeekWire | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
BMW appears to be expanding its DriveNow car-sharing service in Seattle, taking direct aim at Car2Go in one of its most successful markets. GeekWire reader
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It makes total sense, there are the obvious concerns about abuse, people leaving cars dirty inside, smoking in them, but in reality BMW will no doubt have cameras and other forms of sensors and I'm sure anyone abusing the membership system will quickly find an debit on their credit card and the door will fail to open next time they want to use them. This is a great concept and it appears there are sufficient users to make it pay, for the DriveNow company, BMW and for the city to provide EV parking spots. With 50,000 registered users, if I read that right, this can have a significant beneficial impact to urban traffic congestion.
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Traffic Lite Social GPS & Maps – Applications Android sur Google Play

Traffic Lite Social GPS & Maps – Applications Android sur Google Play | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Obtenez des rapports de circulation en temps réel sur les routes populaires près de chez vous. Cartes GPS sociaux Routes
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I clicked on the link, read the blurb, which is in English by the way:) I thought to myself, if they do everything that Waze does and Waze isn't [particularly successful in my part of the world, why would I want to try a look alike? Then Google Play told me I didn't have a Google device, which is true, so I carried on with my day:)
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American Panorama is a series of interactive maps that let's you explore American history.

American Panorama is a series of interactive maps that let's you explore American history. | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

a wealth of uses for thiAmerican Panorama is a series of interactive maps that lets you explore American history.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

In an age when mass migration has grown to epic proportions, the ability to see what is happening is highly valuable for everyone from individuals, to municipalities, to Government.
All the data is there and the opportunities to learn from the past are huge. Whether it is understanding the ethnic shifts in your part of the world, tracing back your family history, or more practical things like planning where you want to live and work, there are a wealth of uses for technology like this. Most if it just comes down to someone using pretty much off the shelf geospatial visualization tools and big data containing place names or coordinates.

 

What doesn't seem to happen enough yet is making that data available to the untrained public in a user friendly way. The intelligence that can come out of historical data is immense.

 

If your origins are from another part of the world (something that is fact for every person in New Zealand and most in the North America), being able to follow a trail on a map should become a standard  genealogy tool and would make fascinating viewing of how people looked for a better way of life and how that may have started in Italy or Germany or Great Britain, moved from one country to the next, through a country, then into cities, then into parts of the city until in some cases assimilation and in others, ethnic enclaves.

 

We can learn a lot from history and in my opinion we can all learn from the perspective that most of us are at least descended from migrants. My blue eyes didn't originate in Holland where I was born. They are probably the result of Scandinavians who invaded parts of Europe in waves over a number of centuries along with many other ethnicities to the point that they seeded new genetic mixes throughout Europe, just as a future generation of Europeans and Brits  did in shifting their homes to the Americas and the South Pacific in later years.

 

Migration is as much part of our culture as it was for the hunter gatherers of our prehistoric ancestors. It's just that now we can cross the world in 24 hours.

 

A picture speaks a thousand words and tools like these today could help us all understand a little more about how we came to be in the places we currently inhabit. Some of the stories that we can glean from these tools could help us understand how to make the most of some of the changes happening today. There might be other answers besides building walls and perhaps a reminder that the ethnic purity that many people try to protect is a myth. We are a rich amalgam of origins and DNA, which was probably one of the key things that has stopped our generation of humans from wiping themselves out.

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Canada to require bus and truck drivers to log hours electronically

Canada to require bus and truck drivers to log hours electronically | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
After years of study, the federal government says it's working to implement new safety regulations that are aligned with U.S. efforts to tackle fatigue among truck and bus drivers.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was having a discussion with someone earlier this week about how far behind some parts of the world are when it comes to GPS vehicle tracking and other technologies. I note that in Canada some operators especially owners drivers are looking for incentives. I would start by looking at insurance companies. As the article says, one of the major causes of crashes is driver fatigue. Drivers with hand written log books can easily doctor the books in order to reach their destinations and I can imagine reasons why Canadian truck drivers might want to, especially in winter when they are over their hours, but don't want to park up for 12 hours in the freezing cold in the middle of nowhere if weather conditions or other issues have caused delays. So staying alive and not crashing seems to me to be a good incentive. Forcing the issue might also reduce the use of substances from caffeine to others including illegal substances that might keep drivers awake and alert for some time, but the crash (pun intended) afterwards when their bodies resources are depleted and the drugs wear off are a common clause of people even momentarily falling asleep behind the wheel. I would suggest that as the Federal Government looks at how to make this work, they send working groups to New Zealand, where we have been using this technology for over a decade, even if fatigue and safety were not the primary reason the tech was employed, which was in fact a reduction in fuel tax for km driven off public roads, such as milk tankers and forestry trucks which spend a lot of time on private farm roads.
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GPS doodles and the art of turning exercise into an adventure

GPS doodles and the art of turning exercise into an adventure | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

When Stephen Lund first saw his cycling movements mapped out in red on GPS tracking website Strava, he immediately recognised the service's potential beyond ...

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Stephen isn't the first person I've blogged about who has used Strava to create images by riding a bike using GPS on his mobile as he wheels through a city or country.

I still haven't reached the holy grail for my walking where I  can generate a map on my mobile that shows me one one image which roads I haven't walked on, so that every day I can do a different route anywhere in the world, but that's another story.

Taking this step a bit further, imagine where you could take this doodling concept? Brands could sponsor rides to get people to ride their logo on a map. Cities could come up with competitions to encourage more people to ride (and walk) and either create art, or follow tracks that other people have designed so that they can complete art pieces by doing exercise.

Like Swarm/Foursquare, imagine thousands of people going out over the weekend, getting gamified exercise on their Eco-friendly transport, having fun, perhaps getting digital badges, or maybe special discounts or rewards by checking in at retailers along the way, include the locations of shops or cafes where they can hydrate and off course public toilets.

Sounds perhaps like an app that could be developed as a plug in to Strava by a consortium of government, retailers, developers, cycle and walking industry players and perhaps co-funded by a drug company. Who's up for this?

 

 

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Amateur archaeologists are finding lost Roman roads using lasers

Amateur archaeologists are finding lost Roman roads using lasers | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
"Latest News – NEW ROAD DISCOVERED," reads David Ratledge's page on the Roman Roads Research Association. "After only 45 years of searching, I have at long last found the Roman Road from Ribchester to Lancaster!" Ratledge, an amateur archaeologist, has indeed been looking for evidence of Roman roads in Lancashire, England for 45 years. He has...
Luigi Cappel's insight:
We used LiDAR among other technologies to develop an accurate road centre line in New Zealand to support car navigation and particularly Fleet Management. We used it both from our mapping car and with aerial orthophotography and today it is of course becoming widely used in the support of driverless cars and it needs to be, although it is still just one of the technologies employed for this purpose. It is not the holy grail. Perhaps however it may also be used to locate holy grail as in this story where it was used to locate a once important Roman road. Sometimes as we travel on our journey into the future, it is easy to forget that horses, carts and chariots have been traveling similar routes for more than 2,000 years. So while we pat ourselves on the back for being so clever and the massive rate of change, we might do well to remember that they had long straight roads long before we started thinking about creating faster horses. Perhaps there is more we can learn from them. What particularly interests me is that we are discovering this, i.e. the information was lost, and that the discovery was by an amateur archaeologist. In a thousand years from now, as per the old song "In the Year 2525, if man is still alive", what will they think of us? Homo mobilis? Will they think we were clever?
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Self-Driving Cars Clear a Hurdle, With Computer Called Driver

Self-Driving Cars Clear a Hurdle, With Computer Called Driver | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Federal highway regulators, aiming to help companies figure out how to meet safety standards when designing cars, are willing to consider a computer running an autonomous vehicle as the “driver.”...

Luigi Cappel's insight:

It seems to have been on again - off again with insurance companies accepting liability for any accidents caused by driverless cars.
One way or another I have been in the ITC industry all of my career. I have dealt with computer crashes, failed backups, failed updates and much more during those years at work and at home.
Some of those problems came from the technology, faulty chips are not unusual, if not commonplace. Sometimes updates work, sometimes updates contain new bugs or problems. Sometimes backups work, sometimes they don't.
Systems that control some of our most important technologies fail from time to time, especially when they are overloaded, take electronic banking for example. The banks typically guarantee our money of things go wrong, but what happens if something goes wrong at 130km per hour?
I love the confidence and it may be that it is the computer that fails, or it may be that the computer fails to comprehend decisions made by humans. There will be some very interesting cases of crashes where the human driver may not have broken the law, however the car computer may have misinterpreted what happened and in fact cause a crash.
I heard a statistic on the news recently about plane crashes, saying some huge percentage, most plane crashes were caused by pilot error. We very rarely hear about computer malfunctions or equipment malfunctions (at least in the media, I have been grounded many times due to technology failure as will most frequent fliers. Of course plane manufacturers have significant financial assets at their disposal in the case of a law suit, as would Google or a car manufacturer.
Things are going to get very interesting. Don't get me wrong, I totally support platooning of trucks and other forms of autonomous vehicle use. I just have a few concerns that I am sure will get sorted, right?

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Connected Semis Will Make Trucking Way More Efficient

Connected Semis Will Make Trucking Way More Efficient | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Connected cars are nice, says Zonar CEO Brett Brinton. But when it comes to trucks, "we believe it's a completely different story."
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I don't know about you, but this sounds like what Fleet Management companies in New Zealand have been doing for years.
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These maps show how far $50 of gas will get you

These maps show how far $50 of gas will get you | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

How to take a fabulous road trip for just $50.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is great for Americans, may you enjoy many miles of happy motoring, but for we Kiwi's the scale doesn't seem to work the same. With the price of oil coming down, Americans have gone from paying $3.50 a gallon in 1980 to less than $2 a gallon today. In New Zealand in 1981 we were paying $NZ2.70 a gallon.

So going by the same ration, we should be getting it really cheap! But no, we are now paying around $8.10 a gallon for 91 Octane.

Oil companies tell us that the price of a barrel of oil doesn't have much to do with the cost of petrol at the pump. However this Washington Post (reasonably reputable) article links the fact that oil prices are at their lowest ever is a key factor. That is true, because we pay in excess of $2.70 a gallon in petrol tax, about the same as Americans pay for their entire fuel delivered to the petrol tank of their cars. I wouldn't have thought the cost of moving oil, given it's refined locally would be much more than in the USA and I also wouldn't have thought the cost of running a gas station would be much different either.

So I wonder if someone could explain to me why, with the cost of oil being so low, in America they are paying about 40% less for their fuel per gallon than they paid in 1980 at the same time as we are paying around 300% more?

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The future of mobility: How transportation technology and social trends are creating a new business ecosystem

The future of mobility: How transportation technology and social trends are creating a new business ecosystem | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

How will advances in transportation technologies and shifts in social attitudes shape the future of mobility?

Luigi Cappel's insight:

As a futurist one of the hardest things to come to grips with, but the most important reality is that significant change takes time, a lot of time. In relation to previous eras, change happens very quickly, but it doesn't take place as quickly as we think and they are evolutionary rather than revolutionary.

If you think the fit-bit is a revolution that occurred overnight, think again. When did you first get a pedometer? I think I got my first one about 15 years ago, but it could be longer. Of course this is a simple and low cost technology. Driverless cars as a total shift has massive implications as this article points out, not only to the way we drive and the implications for what happens on the road, but also to whole industries dependent on car purchasing and ownership.

I agree that the shift to reduced car ownership is being accelerated in cities due to the emergence of wild card companies like Uber and Lyft. I also strongly agree that the shift will occur at varying rates in different countries around the world and between cities well provisioned with safe, comfortable and timely public transport, versus rural areas where motor vehicle ownership is essential.

The benefits of reduced numbers of vehicles on the road (at massive costs to the GDP of some economies) will be enormous, once they develop all the supporting systems, but that takes time.

In the meantime, vehicle production and sales have yet to peak and whilst they may be safer, that also gives many inexperienced drivers more false security and other than through campaigns on fatigue, distracted and drug and alcohol impaired driving, many are driving faster in more powerful cars, without the skills to control them.

Back to the article, I recommend it to you as a more balanced view of the changes to come.

If you don't want to read the article, here are the fundamental conclusions:

1: Industries will rise and fall. It's a great time to be thinking about new careers and investments in new segments and a great time to get out of some as well.

2: The potential benefits of disruptors are compelling. They are creating the tipping points.It usually takes disruption to manifest significant change.

3: The auto industry can lead the changes, but traditional businesses as I have frequently blogged, find it very difficult to change. It's significant that many of the changes today are not coming from Toyota, Ford or GM, but from Google, Tesla and OEMs. not to mention the Internet of Things and telecommunications.

4: The insiders and the disrupters need each other. Uber doesn't work without someone making cars, driven or autonomous. Transport networks and management need both in order to deal with urban growth.

5: Profound disruption will extend far past the automotive industry. It will pervade everything we do.

6. It will not happen as quickly as many think it will, but the benefits of the technological developments will impact on our lives soon.

 

 

 

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Auckland Council GIS Viewer

Auckland Council GIS Viewer | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Have you ever wondered what your neighborhood used to look like, what the area around your house looked like 30-40 years ago?

 

I was discussing with a friend how much Torbay has changed. Long Bay Beach used to have batches on it, now they have all been removed, but the farmland behind it is being built up faster than the bang of the auctioneers gavel.

 

I used to work for the company that did the aerial photography for North Shore Council before it became amalgamated into the super city and we also owned the White's Aviation Library, which has a million or more historic photos of pretty much every location and historic event in the country (now owned by the Alexander Turnbull Library. It was interesting looking at my old house in Glenfield, or at least where it was built. It's not that many decades ago that it was just farmland, pasture with one big tree as a feature.

 

Anyway I was told about the Auckland Council GIS Viewer. I knew it existed, I've used it in the past, but what I didn't know is that they have a slider bar which allows you to view the area you are interested in, such as centered on your home and see what it looked like from 1940 to 2010. Hopefully 2015-16 will magically appear soon, because some of the greatest changes have happened in that time.

 

If you're not in Auckland, I don't know if there are equivalents for your area, but I sure found it fascinating.

 

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Animated Maps Illustrate the Hell of Bay Area Commuting

Animated Maps Illustrate the Hell of Bay Area Commuting | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Your hellish commute has never looked so pretty. A new set of animated maps plots the commutes of 3.3 million Bay Area residents commuting to 110,000 destinations.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

When was the last time you looked at your census data? We get the forms every 3 years or so, fill them in and many people complain on Facebook about giving up their privacy.

As this example shows, there s a goldmine of wealth in the data and I frequently ask people when they last looked at it. I have worked with many businesses in putting location based data on a map and helped them improve their productivity.

The challenge is thinking outside the square and working out what questions to ask, which is the classic big data question. I've been interested in predictions about the need for data scientists and we definitely need them, but I have to say that to turn this data into usable intelligence requires people to understand the business problem and then to ask questions of people who are so mired in how they do business that they often can't see the wood for the trees. As well as business scientists, we need business analysts, but more importantly, people who understand how different types of business work and businesses prepared to listen, rather than just bean-counters and shareholders looking for an extra 5% profit on last year by reducing spend on marketing, staff remuneration and inventory.

How would you be able to make positive results out of these maps? What if you were in the hospitality industry? How about gas stations, retail, franchising, car-pooling? What might you do differently? What about looking where you live and work, it's really interesting looking at these maps, how many people swap from one side to the other side of the city? Does that seem odd to you? Watch the animations a few times.

 

Then go and have a look at the data for your data. It's available for free.

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Entrepreneurs realised three words can pinpoint ANYWHERE on the planet

Entrepreneurs realised three words can pinpoint ANYWHERE on the planet | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Chris Sheldrick, pictured, and Jack Waley-Cohen's London-based company, what3words, is used to help map parts of the world which are not covered by precise street addresses.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Apparently my office is at Happy.Slip.Poster although I'm not sure if anyone would take me seriously if I shared that information. I do get the concept that this is better than postcodes, even in the UK and fantastic in countries where numbering systems are rudimentary and some where streets don't even have names.

 

I really like the concept, but I think it would take a very special strategy to get people to adopt it en masse. What do you think? Try out the map and search for one of your special places.

 

Perhaps if they tied this in with someone like Uber and add some element of gamification? I can't see the traditional car navigation companies buying into this unfortunately. I know they are very interested in common landmarks, like 'turn right at McDonalds'. But if I was going there I think a cabbie might find it easier for me to ask for McDonalds in Albany, than vitality.finger.become

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Dutch driverless shuttle first to hit public roads

Dutch driverless shuttle first to hit public roads | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A driverless electric shuttle took its first load of passengers a few hundred meters down a route in a rural section of the Netherlands. WePod shuttle is hoping to operate a fleet of the robotic vehicles in the area in the coming years.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
The story doesn't tell you if the driverless shuttle has exclusive use of this path, which would be interesting to know, noting other vehicles in the background. I also looked at the expression on the face of the man in the blue official jacket, but it could be that he is telling people about the consequences of not paying their fare. But seriously, there are likely to be many routes that are pretty safe and connectors, like the driverless train that has been running at Narita airport between terminals for over 25 years make a lot of sense.
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Wireless charging of electric buses to be put to real world test in Germany

Wireless charging of electric buses to be put to real world test in Germany | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
German transport operator RNV is to run a trial of Bombardier's PRIMOVE technology that enables the wireless charging of electric buses by inductive energy transfer.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is very innovative. The first concepts I had seen in Germany and the Netherlands for magnetic inductive bus charging was by having the magnetic equivalent of electric trolleybus wires. That concept was going to be very expensive both to construct and maintain and also potentially very inefficient due to attenuation. If today's systems can provide enough top up power at each bus stop, which already has an electrical supply, the concept is greatly improved. Congratulations to Bombardier for coming up with this concept!
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Revealed, the death maps of Europe

Revealed, the death maps of Europe | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Pensioners in northern Spain, north eastern Italy, and in southern and western France survived up to age 94 thanks mainly to their Mediterranean diet, a study by the University of Porto found.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
As I head for my oncologist appointment this morning, mortality maps seem to be an appropriate topic, especially given the number of people that have been talking to me about the importance of diet, including in relation to cancer recovery or reduction. One of the key ingredients in longevity appear to be diet. I've read many articles in the past showing relationships between diet and exercise and although this article doesn't seem to agree, drinking of wine and altitude also commonly feature in research on life expectancy. I noted another few interesting trends: 1. Life expectancy continues to be increasing rapidly, i.e. more people are living longer. Women continue to outlive men consistently which most families can attest to. I put it down in part to lifestyle (risk-taking) and testosterone. 2. If you have a look at the map you might see the correlation between low lands and high country. Obviously there could be many reasons for that. 3. Countries like the Netherlands which prides itself on its social welfare and health systems, provides great pension plans so that people don't have to still be working in their 70's, do not rank well on the longevity stakes. Although my late grandmother was only a year off 100 and if my grandfather hadn't gone snow blind hiking in the Swiss Alps in his 80's and died of boredom a few years later, in Amsterdam, I suspect that despite his daily Chesterfield cigarette and glass of red wine, he would also have easily reached his mid 90's. It would seem there is a lot of strength in an argument for a healthy diet full of colorful vegetables and unprocessed foods. Perhaps another inconvenient truth.....
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We must pool car sensor data to solve problems on the road - HERE 360

We must pool car sensor data to solve problems on the road - HERE 360 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Has there ever been a more exciting time in the automotive industry? Whether you want to call it “the start of a revolution” like Mary...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is something I have frequently blogged about and it is quite critical. It is interesting, but shows leadership, when a brand of car navigation and travel information services calls for data sharing and there may even be some internal debate about this.

 

The issue is partly about how each brand of motor vehicle manufacturer and OEM suppliers of hardware, software and services to the industry maintains their unique value proposition. After all if all cars had the same features, we might as well have 2 or 3 brands and that just to keep each one on their toes.

 

However the scenario I have explored previously where brands like Volvo (to pick on just one brand) have systems where Volvo's of certain models can tell other Volvo's that there is black ice ahead, perhaps a pothole or some reason why other vehicles in the vicinity have recently had to brake harshly to avoid an incident or a crash. Great if you have one of those cars, but what if you have a Toyota or a Mitsubishi?

 

There is a significant global movement based on open data. V2V or vehicle to vehicle communications is just one of the jargon terms focused on how vehicles tell each other information that improves road safety, reduces congestion and facilitates the road to the future of driverless cars. Without sharing data, that future could be stalled by a major road block.

 

The challenge for brands is how they cooperate and still stand out in a competitive market. The ideal situation in my humble opinion (IMHO) would be that brands of data, motor vehicles and accessories stand out if they DON'T participate in data sharing. Imagine being the car brand that doesn't talk to other car brands and share information, more importantly doesn't receive it. Perhaps there will be safety ratings similar to those already employed in many countries around safety features such as ABS, air bags and crumple zones.

 

Would you want to be in one of the vehicles driving on a pre-dawn  ski trip through heavy fog, that can't talk to other cars that would have told your car that all the vehicles around that blind corner in front of you in a 120km per hour area have come to a dead stop?

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UK roads to become connected and autonomous vehicle test-track

UK roads to become connected and autonomous vehicle test-track | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Miles of roads in the UK are to be used for testing connected and autonomous vehicle technologies. The UK Connected Intelligent Transport Environment project will evaluate new tech in real-world driving conditions.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Another great example of funds and supported projects designed to help develop smarter cities. With urban growth these are totally essential. I would hope that countries work closer together on these projects because reinventing lots of wheels doesn't make them compatible and in countries where you can drive across borders, systems need to continue working seamlessly. Or countries like New Zealand where the majority of car imports are used cars from other countries, particularly Japan, which were never designed to be driven outside of that country. My greatest concern is to ensure that OEM aftermarket solutions are developed at the same pace because there are a number of potential wild cards. 1. Less people will buy cars. 2. There will be a resultant growing stock of aged cars. 3. If those cars are not able to communicate on these new networks then a primary function of the new technologies may be to protect the new vehicle occupants from the old, rather than improving urban travel mobility, journey predictability, reducing congestion and costs; and network efficiency. I sometimes wonder which cart is driving the horse. Is it the Google's and BI leaders, the car manufacturers, central and local governments, oil companies or the people?
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Fully autonomous cars not due until 2050 -

Fully autonomous cars not due until 2050 - | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Experts have said we will have to wait some time for autonomous cars, with all vehicles predicted to be 'highly autonomous' by 2040 but not fully driverless until 10 years later.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
That's not what everyone is wanting to hear is it? Highly autonomous means loads of safety components and location aware intelligence; cars communicating with each other across common standards, but it still has a driver behind the seat, ready to maintain control if necessary. A very interesting survey attached to this article says that 49% of Britons would not travel in a driverless car based on safety fears. So what does that mean to us? I doubt that I will be worrying too much if driverless cars will not be a mass market option for another 35 years. What I am pleased with though, is the significant increase of Government investment in this technology, hopefully also for use in public transport, because I see far more value in coming up with ways that the majority of transport users no longer feel a need to own their own large vehicles. Whether it is pods of some sort that pick you up from your origin and connect you to a Public Transport platoon and then disconnect and take you to your destination. That would seem to me to be much more valuable than individually owned vehicles, says someone who enjoys driving. Particularly given the increased urban population during that time. Many large cities will double in population, but there is insufficient land to proportionally increase the amount of pavement for them. As I have said many times in previous blogs, if 95% of crashes are due to human error (nice generic term) then safety technology is essential. My fear is that the more technology we have, the less driving skills we need and the less alert we are likely to be to a situation where the 'driver' needs to take back control of the vehicle. Not an easy thing to do if you re not even facing forward as in some of these images and videos. Sometimes I wonder if we are still trying to build faster horses instead of novel 21st century transport solutions.
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New London Underground map shows how expensive it is to rent stop-by-stop

New London Underground map shows how expensive it is to rent stop-by-stop | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Another handy London Underground map has been released, this time showing how
expensive it is to rent at each Tube stop
Luigi Cappel's insight:
In my book about buying a house using location based services http://amzn.to/241MlcT I wrote about looking at a property you might be interested in based on crime maps. I'm not sure if there is a crime map based on the London Tube routes, but it wouldn't be hard to overlay the two data sets, or at least identify suburbs. It would be really interesting to see if the prices for rents compare with the frequency and types of crime in the area. Sometimes you might get what you pay for.
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USDOT reports to US Congress on DSRC for connected vehicles

USDOT reports to US Congress on DSRC for connected vehicles | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The US Department of Transportation has released its report to the United States Congress assessing the status of dedicated short-range communications for connected vehicle technologies. The findings are that they are ready for deployment.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
And we get closer and closer to connected cars. As I have blogged before, this is an offshoot of the development of driverless cars. As with the space program and military technology, the longer term futuristic concepts feed short term beneficial technologies. What this report essentially does is gives auto manufacturers the opportunity to start developing V2V communications technologies on a radio spectrum that they believe will generate minimal risk of interference. As a consequence, at the very last, cars manufactured for the US market will start featuring technologies such as communicating cruise control, proximity detection and alerts and event alerts, for example airbag deployment. The key to the success is that manufacturers agree on standards so we no longer have situations where only cars of a certain brand will 'talk to each other'. There also remain security issues, as there is with the entire Internet of Things (IoT). Imagine being able to hack 10% of vehicles on a stretch of freeway...
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Britain's silliest place names

Britain's silliest place names | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

From Bottom Burn to Netherthong, a new map highlights the silliest towns and
villages in Britain

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is something you just need to go and look at. There are 10 pages of maps with some of the silliest place names you have ever heard of and they are all real.

I used to think 'only in America, but when it comes to place names , I think perhaps Britain takes the cake. Imagine coming back from a road trip and when people ask where you have been you list places like Bottom Burn, East Breast, Dickland, Shyte Brook, Thonglands, Loose Bottom, Brown Willy, Great Snoring, Frolic and Cockplay, the only redeeming factor would be that you didn't have to say you live there.

It reminds me of the guy who owned the second hand shop in Eketahuna in New Zealand who had an outrigger sailboat air freighted from the Pacific Islands and when he inquired as to why it hadn't been delivered, he was told that it had been sent back to the Islands because no such place existed. I can attest to the fact that it exists. I used to work with a colleague who was born there and I met and had coffee with the guy who bought the outrigger.

It has recently become famous because they are closing the only pub in town, which doesn't leave much for anyone. On the other hand, for those who say that you can't buy a house in New Zealand any more. There are houses in Eketahuna for sale for as little as $45,000. I'm not sure what you would do for a job, you might need to work on a farm or commute to Levin, but a 3 bedroom house for under US$30,000 or 20,000 British pounds wouldn't be too bad to retire on a pension. Don't take my word for it, check it out here http://bit.ly/1Qlxfoy.

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