Location Is Everywhere
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Uber knows you'll probably pay surge pricing if your battery is about to die

Uber knows you'll probably pay surge pricing if your battery is about to die | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Uber's surge pricing can be annoying. Why pay more if you can wait 15 minutes and pay less? And that's exactly the point — surge pricing is meant to apply downward pressure to demand throug
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is not a question that many people would be thinking about and unlikely to come from conventional research. The implications are significant though because battery level in your mobile is something that can be shared with applications.

Imagine marketing opportunities if you were able to detect low battery in someone's mobile. For example:

1. A restaurant, bar or food business app with proximity could offer a free charge while you eat.

2. Any destination running a loyalty program, for example a gas station brand could offer the same. Quick charge while you fill up and buy a coffee. Same for movie theaters who want you to keep your phone off anyway would win your loyalty over other chains.

3. Mobile GPS mapping applications (that suck battery power) could offer directions to a location where you could charge it (if you don't have a charger with you, it happens). At the very least it would be good PR to let you know you were down to say 30% and build loyalty towards that service.

4. Public Service apps like Civil Defence would also serve well if they sent you a battery low warning, especially if there were conditions such as storm warnings in the area or other current alerts.

5. Corporate Apps such as field sales or service automation.

So Uber have kindly shared an interesting observation. Who is going to act on it?
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$30K Retrofit Turns Dumb Semis Into Self-Driving Robots

$30K Retrofit Turns Dumb Semis Into Self-Driving Robots | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A new startup called Otto is promising an autonomous kit than can make existing trucks drive themselves.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's a work in progress, but an aftermarket upgrade that can convert an ordinary truck (manufactured after 2013) into a driverless truck for $30,000 doesn't sound like a bad investment.

From what I can glean at this stage all the prototype does is stay within a lane. It can't change lanes without a driver, but will slow down and platoon behind anything ahead in it's lane. A bit of a shame if that's a vehicle traveling at very slow speeds.

However this is a project in development with some high flying leadership from companies like Google Maps and Tesla.

It's sort of comparable to a plane that requires (legally at least) a pilot to take off and land. This truck requires a driver to change lanes and I to manoevre through intersections and complex road networks. It could however give a driver a lot more rest time when they are on the freeway which would have them being more alert when needed.

What I feel a lot of previous news stories have been a bit misleading is countered in the following statement from the article: "Google’s self-driving cars, for example, can’t go anywhere without extremely high-res maps in hand". These don't exist in many parts of the world, or at least don't exist commercially.

Having driven guided by car navigation systems from leading brands in New Zealand, Australia, the USA and Europe. I have had many experiences where I've been on roads that aren't on maps, where the maps are inaccurate and where there have been significant changes to roads such as realignments. This despite navigation brands claiming to have highly accurate maps that are frequently updated.

If you look through my blogs you will find countless stories of accidents and mishaps where humans (who are in control of vehicles) have driven into rivers and canals, got stuck between buildings on narrow roads and more; and that is with a driver behind the wheel. Here are just 18 examples http://bit.ly/25bn9DL. If you troll through my blogs you will find many more,

A human should be able to recognize that what they are being told is different to what they are seeing. LiDAR and other technologies ate pretty good, but they do not work perfectly and not in all conditions which is why mapping cars use a combination of several technologies. HD Mapping is still relatively new and in many countries limited to small parts of the roading network.

The concept is fantastic and there are distinct benefits from low cost retrofit systems, however IMHO it is going to take several years before we see driverless vehicles becoming a trend in any significant numbers (outside of specified freeways) and if the technology is pushed to hard and fast to be commercialized, the industry could be significantly set back due to fall out after accidents or crashes. This is why truck manufacturers are involving insurance companies as supporters at an early stage.

It's fine to use insurance companies as a reference at this point and good, well meaning publicity, however one must remember that insurance companies are risk averse and will change their mind in an instant if they find they are paying out on significant claims.
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You'll Never Get Lost Again With These Futuristic GPS Sneakers

You'll Never Get Lost Again With These Futuristic GPS Sneakers | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A British airline is trying to make GPS shoes that will help tourists get around foreign areas easier and safer.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Where did you get those shoes. I have to be honest, I have never purchased a pair of shoes on a plane. But would I like a pair of these? Probably, because I know other people would use them and you could do fun things with them like creating tourist oriented location based games.

They could be great to take people on tourist trails and help them find their way back to their hotel. They could take you to places of interest like the nearest storefront of a particular British Airline, but now I',m being facetious. Great idea, but I would have thought the type of person who would buy these would already have a very smartphone.

Nevertheless, back when I was exploring the streets of London, Paris, New York and other places where you don't want to look like a tourist by consulting your map all the time, like the time I almost got mugged exploring the outskirts of Vegas, a shoe that buzzes when you should turn right isn't a bad idea.

Go Easyjet, I love innovation and I commend you for that.
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This elevator could shape the cities of the future

This elevator could shape the cities of the future | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A new magnetic levitation elevator can go up and down, side to side, and right out the building to connect with the surrounding city.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I continue to be amazed at the number of developments that seem to be coming straight out of Jules Verne and HG Wells novels.

There was a ride I went on in one of the Disney World parks in Orlando that worked like this, although it was very mechanical and didn't have the smooth ride that you would expect from a Mag-Lev system. It went up and down, sideways and then threatened to toss you out of the wall of the building.

As we migrate to super cities with massive buildings, it makes total sense to have elevators that can not only take you up and down buildings, but through blocks of buildings.

It would be great to start with mega-campuses like hospitals, and big government hives where large numbers of people are housed and travelators are not practical, as used in airports. I would expect to also see more of these systems on elevated sidewalks in cities, where you can step from a slow one across to a faster band and back as you reach your destination.

Of course in some cities you can already walk up and down main streets faster than motorized traffic can travel, but why not design cities where everyone cane travel safely at a meaningful pace, that means that oil fired vehicles are not the most practical means of transport. Public transport doesn't have to be restricted to buses, trains and ferries does it?
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GM, Lyft to Test Self-Driving Electric Taxis

GM, Lyft to Test Self-Driving Electric Taxis | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
General Motors Co. and Lyft Inc. will begin testing a fleet of self-driving Chevrolet Bolt electric taxis on public roads within a year, a move central to the companies’ joint efforts to challenge Silicon Valley giants in the battle to reshape the...
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Are you ready to get into a taxi that has no driver. It sounds almost as scary as the first cars must have appeared to people watching from the comfort of their horses. According to this story, you might get the chance in the US within a year.
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Autism Glass Takes Top Student Health Tech Prize [Slide Show]

Autism Glass Takes Top Student Health Tech Prize [Slide Show] | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A Stanford grad student's invention uses Google Glass to help autistic children recognize facial and social cues in real time
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great example of the evolution of complementary technologies that spill into unexpected areas. The chat about Google Glass has gone quiet among the masses who quickly moved on to buying Fitbits. Meanwhile others have continued to explore the potential to put glass to good use.

Whilst the story is about helping autistic people interpret emotions, the developer, now 20, when he was 17, created the foundation for Sension http://www.sension.co/ which interprets the degree of engagement of people.

This IP was sold to Japanese company GAIA who have been involved in the social challenges of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) for some time. One of the areas they are using this technology in is using glass technology to identify whether a driver is alert or perhaps nodding off behind the wheel.

Fatigue is a major cause of crashes and many companies are looking at developing solutions in this space. For example:

-The CDC has a prototype system that monitors facial expressions to see if you are dozing off behind the wheel bit.ly/21XwXvC. It sets off a sound alarm as well as activates your hazard lights to warn other drivers that you may have a problem.

-Plessey Semiconductor is working on a solution called EPIC or Electrical Potential Integrated Circuit which can monitor your heart rate through technology in the drivers seat, through many layers of clothing. They are developing this with researchers at Nottingham Trent University in the UK.

-Nissan is racing ahead in the production race. Their 2016 Maxima Sport will have a system which learns your  steering style on the wheel and will alert you if your driving behaviour changes or if it notices that you appear to not be controlling the steering wheel. It will beep, let you know how long you have been driving and ask you if you might be ready for a coffee through the console display. http://on.mash.to/27erSTN

These are just a few examples. Marques like Mercedes and BMW have been working on this technology for several years, but typically in top of the line models.

Given that Nissan is able to put a system into a standard 2016 vehicle retailing at $36,000 you would think that it would now be possible to also install something into commercial vehicles, especially long distance trucks where drivers may be behind the wheel for up to 11 hours on a shift.
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Milford company’s GPS app charts the scenic route

Milford company’s GPS app charts the scenic route | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
MILFORD >> Most navigation Apps are designed to get people to their destination as quickly as possible, but now there’s a new app designed by two men from Milford that takes walkers and drivers via the slower, scenic routes.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
These guys could be onto a winner here, the key not so much about being on the long route, because all major nav systems have options such as 'Avoid Main Roads' which could be a great way to see Route 66. However the concept here is crowd sourced information about routes and locations of interest.

For starters most areas have scenic routes, but navigation systems typically don't have them noted as such. All navigation systems have POI or Points of Interest ranging from shops to parks, beaches and public toilets. What they don't have so much of is the really cool places that a lot of people don't know about.

For example, I take a less congested route to work where I go past magnificent beaches, there are many random places in New Zealand where you can see seals, penguins, bird colonies, dolphins, old abandoned villas and other attractions that you might never find out about, just on the side of the road. The concept of sharing rides or walks isn't new of course and there are apps out there designed to give you walking and riding tours for special interests but these are typically localized.

A few years ago my wife and I did a blues music history tour of 4 States. There was no app, there were leaflets and brochure-ware, which is still extremely common in the US outside of the big cities and they were very difficult to navigate. They were fine for identifying places to see, but to put them together into a route was a nightmare which cost me many evening hours after long days of traveling, when I would rather have been relaxing.

A great market would be for people doing road trips. I remember spending an evening with a couple who did a Winnebago tour circumnavigating the coast of Australia. They said that the best sites they found and sights they saw were provided by word of mouth by other people doing the same type of trip. For example they told me about a camping ground they were going to go to in the Northern Territory. They said they were told by other travelers  about a freedom camp on the beach with showers, toilets etc and the most amazing sunsets that they would never have found otherwise. It wasn't on the map and a few miles up a dirt road from the place they were going to spend the night at.

The Round Scenic Route sounds like a great application. If the founders read this blog, I am still looking for an app that lets me log every road I have walked or driven on and by mode. I'm sure cyclists would want this as well.

The idea is I would be highly motivated to be able to say I have walked on every street in the neighborhood and over time I'd also like to be able to do the same, phasing the walk called Te Araroa http://www.teararoa.org.nz/ which goes from the top of the New Zealand to the bottom over a numb of years. I'd like to be able to look at a map on my mobile device that highlighted every road I have been on, not just overlay specific routes which is what apps like Map my Run and Strava do very well.

There are plenty of commercial travel apps out there that are good for tourism in sectors, but they are typically commercially focused, because they are funded by advertising revenue, on advertisers Points of Interest, rather than those wonderful hidden gems that locals and 'off the main road' travelers know about.
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New Program Makes Free GPS Wristbands Available To Ohio Co. Families - EagleCountryOnline.com

Ohio County parents can get help keeping tabs on children or other loved ones who might wander off.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
If you have followed my blogs in the past you will know that I have long advocated for GPS trackers for people with autism and other conditions where they may become lost or disoriented, I even looked very closely at setting up my own business distributing them.

What is really cool about this story is that Rising-Sun Ohio schools have purchased a quantity to provide free of charge for use with children who have special needs.

The frustration is that these concepts have been obvious for so long but it's probably been 10 years since I started pushing for technologies like these to be made available and suitable for he purpose and people who would be using them.
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All Indian Cell Phones To Have Panic Buttons From January 1

All Indian Cell Phones To Have Panic Buttons From January 1 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Come January 1, 2017. Every mobile phone in India will be fitted with a panic button that can be used by women in danger, Minister for Child and Women Development Maneka Gandhi said on Friday.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had a weird dream this morning where a bunch of hoods were chasing me to rob me. I hid in a closet in a hall they were ransacking and realizing it was a a dream decided I would wake up instead of seeing how it played out.

As I woke up, I thought to myself I could ring 111 (our 911) but if I had to talk to the call centre, I would be giving up my location to the hoods. I then decided that I would txt someone and ask them to call the Police, That would take some time and there is no guarantee that they would even see the text in time to help.

So the next thought was why isn't there a simple mobile system that isn't easily able to be triggered accidentally like the panic button on my car's remote (which probably woke the neighborhood yesterday).

It should be easy to develop a tool like Facebook Live or Skype to contact Police, activate the GPS so they can find you and view through one or both of the cameras on the phone so they can get a visual on what is going on.

So why don't we have a system like that when today in many places there are as many or more mobiles with GPS and cameras than there are people?
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Cities are the New Nations

Cities are the New Nations | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
“Political geography is not determinant anymore, because cities are more important.”
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It is interesting that for the first time I can remember, I seem to be talking to more people looking to leave Auckland city than planning to stay. Of course we are now one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in. Unfortunately cost of housing is now out of hack with incomes.

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Top 10 American Cities for Working Moms

Top 10 American Cities for Working Moms | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Can one really have it all? We set out to find where in the U.S. a career woman can find the best opportunities for herself and her kids.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
We still live in a world where there is income inequality between the genders, but there are cities that offer great lifestyle, good incomes and some in this list where female executives significantly outnumber meny.

The tide is changing and it's about time. Of course there are parts of the US and parts of the world where women may be seen to be treated as second class citizens. I have seen plenty of that myself.

You do need to take some care when examining these statistics, because there are some lower paying jobs, such as domestic household work that are dominated by women. Taking that into consideration it is interesting that a city like Orlando, with its many hotels, resorts and theme parks, where women earn on average 95% of men's salary. There are programs designed specifically to educate and promote women into executive positions.

I'm just sharing the link and stats here, but I'm happy to weigh in that I work in a business that has many female executives including my own CE and they are all very good at their work. I don't believe that there are many jobs where women can't equal men in performance. I also believe that the mix should reflect the gender balance in society.

These sorts of statistics are available in most countries, so if you are a family and looking at relocating, this may be one of the statistics for cities and suburbs from your national census demographics that you want to check out for a couple of reasons:
1. It will impact on your earning and lifestyle potential.
2. It may reflect on the local societal attitude towards gender equality and how happy you will be living in a particular area.

In my book Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services amzn.to/1RSgyEH I point out a lot of statistics you should consider. Equal pay wasn't one of the things I thought of at the time. You will however find many other valuable insights if you are considering moving to another suburb, city, state or country.
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Pizza Hut turns to algorithms and GPS tracking to increase sales

Pizza Hut turns to algorithms and GPS tracking to increase sales | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Yup, it’s the 'Uber-ization' of pizza, as Pizza Hut joins the wave of chain restaurants embracing tech.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had an idea many years ago which I called Pizza on the Beach. The idea was that using GPS on your phone and prepaying so that it didn't end up being abused by childish pranks, you could order your pizza from anywhere, using a smartphone app and using the GPS on your phone, the delivery person could easily find you even if you were catching some rays on the beach. Like my old favorite app "Where's My Car?'

Pizza Hut appear to be inspired by Uber in this case with the concept being, you can tell where and how far away the pizza is that you ordered. This is a nice simple feature and really good if someone has to go outside and meet the person doing the delivery, or if you are preparing other things to time with the delivery of your food.

It's interesting how one innovation leads into another. Have you thought of any ideas for an industry that could gain an unfair advantage or enhance their service delivery based on what Uber are doing?
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The driverless truck is coming, and it’s going to automate millions of jobs

The driverless truck is coming, and it’s going to automate millions of jobs | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A convoy of self-driving trucks recently drove across Europe and arrived at the Port of Rotterdam. No technology will automate away more jobs — or drive more economic efficiency — than the driverless truck.

Shipping a full truckload from L.A.

Luigi Cappel's insight:
I sat next to a politician on a plane last week who quizzed me and then told me that driving is the number one occupation for men in the world. The irony is that the industry can't entice young people into the role and there is a major shortage of truck drivers. Young people don't want the work.

They simply can't get enough drivers and that causes major problems to the value chain in business, food, pretty much everything we do. In most countries trucks are the most efficient and essential form of getting goods from manufacturers, and from ports, to customers or the next part of the value chain.

It will be a long time before humans are fully replaced, but given not enough people want to drive these vehicles, right now that also means we are paying too much for our goods and services. As the writer pointed out, trucks are also limited by the safety requirements that limit the number of hours a driver is permitted to operate the vehicle, whilst the trucks themselves would be more productive and efficient if they could be used 24:7.

Solving the road freight problem will have major spin-offs for other industries and will create new jobs as most new technologies do.

When I was at elementary school I was told that my problem was going to be what to do with my spare time because technology was going to replace a large proportion of jobs. So why am I working 50+ hour weeks? We shouldn't be watching these new technologies with angst, we should be thinking about how to take advantage of reduced freight costs and increased efficiency.
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Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services - Kindle edition by Luigi Cappel. Crafts, Hobbies & Home Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services - Kindle edition by Luigi Cappel. Crafts, Hobbies & Home Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com. | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services - Kindle edition by Luigi Cappel. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
If you are considering buying a house anywhere in the world, you have a lot to think about. It is one of the most important but stressful decisions you will make in your life. The lessons you will make in doing so will be costly and can be minimized.

How do you decide that it is the right one for you? How do you remember which feature wall went with the bathroom you liked?

What sort of people live in the neighborhood? Are they like you in age, young families, is there a lot of crime, what's it going to be getting to work or getting the kids to school? Are there school zones that you might need to think about. What's the resale value like?

It is a very scary market, yet we often rely on sales agents who are motivated to get the best deal for their clients (if they are any good) and wanting to move properties on as quickly as possible.

You are the one that will be stuck with your purchase. Whether you are a first home buyer in Los Angeles or buying rental properties in the hot market in Auckland  or Tauranga, New Zealand, this is well worth a read and could be your best investment, for less than the price of 2 cups of coffee.

Sometimes you get a lot more than you paid for. It's rare, I know. If you are buying., or know someone who is buying, I strongly recommend checking it out. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FMIB6LW/ref=rdr_kindle_ext_tmb
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GPS 'gotcha' gets Winona man in bike theft; police find number of bikes, parts in house

GPS 'gotcha' gets Winona man in bike theft; police find number of bikes, parts in house | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A GPS unit hidden in a bike tire has led to felony theft charges against a Winona man who had a number of bikes and parts inside his residence.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
You might think it's only a bike, but what if it was your bike, or jet ski, or the Gibson Les Paul that you saved up for years to buy?

A very common thread is that when they catch criminals who steal things, using GPS tracking they tend to find a treasure trove of other things that crook has stolen from people. Of course for anyone who has been robbed, especially at home, it is the violation of their home, the place they should feel totally safe. The psychological impact is just as serious as the loss, which can often be covered by insurance.

Given the small number of theft crimes that get solved, its about time that we came up with low cost solutions that allow us, the masses, to track our valuables that get stolen and get convictions over the thieves.

At the moment GPS technology tends to require a GPS chip, a lot of battery power and a SIM card. A reasonable investment for an expensive item that may be at higher risk of being stolen, like a bike, motorbike, car, boat etc.

New technologies are being developed that use technology like WiFi, but at the moment there are no easy ways for people to locate the missing item unless there is a critical mass of people having a shared app keeping an eye out for missing devices in the background. This would be a great device/concept for a mobile network brand to offer, using low powered transmitters detectable by a mobile phone.

Perhaps a city could combine this technology in their network of wireless devices in order to locate stolen vehicles. Programs overseas where they have left bait bikes, cars and other devices have proven successful in catching recidivist thieves.

This is a classic example of something that will happen and will seem so obvious when it does. Its just a shame we have to wait so long for it. Meanwhile GPS tracking devices for pets, children and expensive assets are getting cheaper.  Just not cheap enough to achieve critical mass yet.
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Patrol vehicles to be monitored using GPS

Patrol vehicles to be monitored using GPS | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So the Police tried GPS in 7 of their cars and they decided they were useful. Do you ever feel like sometimes you've fallen into a time warp or woken up in a different dimension? Yet stories like this pop up every day. I know some parts of the world are less affluent than others, but that's just another reason why they should be using this technology which is a small fraction of what it used to be.
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App allows public to share GPS co-ordinates of real-time crime with police

App allows public to share GPS co-ordinates of real-time crime with police | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
BDlive covers economics, business and politics as the website of Business Day, the South African national daily newspaper, including Business Times
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is interesting because it follow hard on the heels of a story I wrote just a couple of weeks ago. The concept of ringing Police is relevant but outdated (not redundant) given that:
1. Most of us have Smartphones with GPS
2. Sometimes you don't want other people hearing you call the Police as it may add risk to the situation.
3. Location is one of the most important things that you need to be able to share with emergency services and you may not know or be able o describe your exact location.
I hope that we see more apps like this in the very near future and it's interesting to read about this one in South Africa.
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Uber turns its hand to yacht rides

Uber turns its hand to yacht rides | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A taxi ride is just a tap of an app away in the modern world, and now so is that yacht trip you've always dreamed of.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Why not right, as long as the skippers comply with safety regulations, but if money changes hands they will have to have the right qualifications or they will also have their insurance voided. As soon as money changes hands it becomes a commercial vessel as most yacht owners know.

On the other hand, many yacht owners don't do trips they would like to do for lack of people to join them and help out as crew.
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Sony patents contact lens that records what you see

Sony patents contact lens that records what you see | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Sony has been awarded a patent for a smart contact lens that would be capable of recording video.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So what would you do with this if it worked, forget about the technology, that will undoubtedly become possible. When Google Glasses came and went, many people were keen, but not on the glasses themselves, so here's a possibility, although this  particular patent is only about capturing, transmitting and storing images rather than displaying anything to the user.

Obviously the spy industry will be all over this whether its government, private eyes or trolls. It would also be very useful for Police an security industries for recording incidents for use as evidence.

I could see them as being very useful in serous event management, such as on the scene of a crash, an earthquake or some form of disaster where .images could be sent through to supporters whilst keeping the person on the ground totally free to do their work.

It does have a transmitter, but doesn't seem to have a microphone and of course if it had anything like GPS, it would need a massive battery, so it's not going to replace GPS tracking units.

Most sports that use tech like GoPro will be happy wearing smaller devices, but I can't imagine any reason why they would go for contact lenses.

I do believe that one day lenses like this will enable some blind people to see, which is the most important opportunity in my mind. My late grandfather burnt his corneas from snow blindness and was given experimental artificial eyes which allowed hm to see shadows and shapes, but they were big and looked like fly's eyes. That was probably 20 years ago, so the concept isn't new.

I would certainly have privacy and security issues with this concept being used in an uncontrolled way. Whilst privacy is all but history, if someone points a mobile or a camera at you, you know you are being recorded. In this case you would have no idea at all. 

What do you think, how would you use them? How would you feel about other people using them. When Google Glasses first came out many people said they would refuse to attend meetings with anyone wearing them, but today with cameras in pens, watches and our Smartphones it would be incredibly easy for people to record discretely anyway.
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Fixing the American Commute

Fixing the American Commute | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
American transportation is a mess. As the costs of repairs rise—fixing U.S. transportation would cost nearly the entire annual federal budget—and automotive technology advances, cars, often seen as a problem, may be our best hope.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
"Americans spend 5.5 billion hours a year stuck in traffic." Imagine what would happen to the economy if even half of that was spent producing goods and services.

As the article says, the concept of building your way out of the traffic problem worked in the 1950's when America had plenty of money and space. You could argue they still have space, but in urban areas, where everyone seems to want to live, or feel they need to in order to get a decent job and lifestyle, green spaces are becoming smaller and sprawl is getting bigger.

Despite the stories we read about people in NYC that have never owned a car and don't even have a license, the number of cars being registered each year are increasing at an alarming pace.

Ride-share and driverless vehicles are certainly part of the puzzle, as are more efficient modes of public transport, but what about home working, flexi-time or satellite offices? Businesses spend a massive amount of money on buildings and location infrastructure, but not so much on training management and staff to be able to work from home. A simple fact is that many companies don't trust their staff and in some cities there are consultancies being set up to teach them how.

Take Unified Comms for example. It has been around for over 10 years in sophisticated forms and today many people have access to a wide variety of communication channels including instant messaging, VoIP, Smartphones, Tablets and communications networks from wireless to fiber. Yet, this is not being taken into the equation and I have to wonder if part of the reason is that the cost burden is being shared with the employee who frequently are not compensated for increased travel costs, or the costs of providing their own Internet and communications systems at home.

If a modest percentage of people were taught how to be productive working at home, and they did that 4-5 days a month it could have a huge impact not only on productivity, but also on the transport network. Of course there are businesses that need front-line staff on the job, that won't change, but not everyone needs to be there all day every day. It is commonly accepted that a 5% improvement in traffic congestion has a positive impact on at least 15% of the commuters.

With population growth, there is a high likelihood that driverless cars, driverless public transport with shuttle hubs not dissimilar to those Jules Verne described well over 100 years ago will make a difference, but with population growth predicted in many cases at 30-40% in the next 30 years, these are also just short term answers.

Older generations might be happy for a slower lifestyle taking their many years of business problem solving into the country, once they have built the security foundations and raised their families, but population growth means youngsters who will want to be in the cities where the action, the entertainment and adventure lifestyle. So now, again as predicted in Science Fiction 100 years ago we build higher and higher. Skyscrapers become the norm because the greatest growth will be urban.Businesses will eventually realize the experience they are losing as the average age of decision makers drops.

The most important solutions, in my mind, aren't so much in transport technology, but in people recognizing that they have responsibilities, that it is their choices to work in cities. Business needs to become more eco-centric because they are ultimately the ones driving people to commute. Why just as an example do we have big breweries and FMCG manufacturers in large urban centers? When I visited Jack Daniels in Lynchburg TN, they seemed to be fine about being out in the country, so did their workers.

They are near a freeway but not near the sea, they are a massive exporter and half of their staff can walk to work. Why are they so different? I'm sure their staff remuneration costs compensate for transport costs, because the real estate is cheaper and they don't have to pay big city salaries, which are partly high because otherwise people couldn't afford the cost of getting to work.

Whilst we need to adapt our transport systems, the biggest shift that business needs to make is a mind shift. Board rooms don't seem to be very good at that. That's why innovative disruptors, from small towns, or from shared incubation spaces manage to beat large institutional businesses. Those big businesses should keep an eye on the number of old wealth names that have been around for generations that are going broke. It's nothing to do with a decline in product and service consumption.

Getting off my soap box now.
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GPS Helps Solve Dispute Over Trashed Turf

GPS Helps Solve Dispute Over Trashed Turf | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A South Florida man says a Miami-Dade County garbage truck took more than his garbage when it went by his house last summer.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great example of the value of GPS data although it took a news agency's help to prove the point. It's a shame that it sometimes has to come to this. Credit to Miami-Dade County. One might wonder about the driver's word though, risking the reputation of his employer by only telling half the story.
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Why restaurants need a hyper-local influencer marketing strategy

Why restaurants need a hyper-local influencer marketing strategy | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The founders of Pizza Pilgrims know a thing or two about influencer marketing.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was so frustrated with Foursquare, I was an ambassador but they wouldn't let people manage multiple clients and the reality is when it comes to local or hyper-local, small businesses are not tech savvy and whilst some of them understand how to and do build relationships through showing an interest in and understanding their client, they mostly don't know much about marketing, but I digress.

Even simple non tech things they could do would make a difference. If you like what we did for you, tell a friend; could now be, if you like what we did for you tell a friend on Facebook.

If big business mostly doesn't get the concept of mavens and influencers, it's pretty unlikely that restaurants will. I'm not disagreeing with the concept, I'm just saying that most hospitality businesses, in fact most businesses not only don't understand influencer marketing, it's not something they would even think about.

This concept is great in the big cities where people follow people and fads. If they know that a famous person eats there, they will want to go and smart establishments that use this concept have those pictures on the walls (now called selfies) with the owner and a famous guest. The more pictures, the greater the implication of success. Some have autographed prints on the walls of sports teams, but that's not what we are talking about and they quickly fade.

All businesses can benefit from influencer marketing. I learned about it when I studied marketing decades ago. In the local world it's more about supporting local for example the boys who score tries at the high school rugby match  might get a free hamburger and off course the team goes with them. But going much further is just not understood. If marketing companies and consultants can make a business out of that in a hyper-local market, that's awesome. If hyper-local means a street corner in Manhattan, I get that opportunity.

In my neighborhood we have some good restaurants, but they would not go past loyalty cards,provide good service, do a little advertising and if possible stay in business. Whilst they are trying really hard to stay in business, they are not focusing on any innovative ideas. They are focusing on what they know how to do, which is either run a business which is better than working for a boss; or perhaps following a passion, like perhaps they enjoy cooking, or being able to employ and support unskilled family members.

The hospitality trade has a high turnover with many new owners being taught how to run the business by the vendors who couldn't make it profitable. May are owned by immigrants who had to invest in a business in order to be allowed to stay in the country. They do what they know how to do, cook their traditional dishes and throw in a few things that locals are used to.

It's an interesting thought though. Even in a local area, it wouldn't be hard to find personalities who have done well for themselves, identities that  people look up to who would be happy to support local. Sports people, community leaders, musicians, writers, and artists. Maybe that's an idea for the local main-street business association to think about.

How do they make it attractive for their local influencers to promote local business to a wider audience? A couple of weeks ago I saw Duncan Garner do a show on our local RSA in Browns Bay. It became a bit advertorial which I'm sure it wasn't. I was thinking to myself, don't tell everyone what great value it is, but the flip side is, I do want to support the RSA and their restaurant. I do want to support local. Maybe this should be a topic for the main-street groups to think about instead of the same old things that they do every year like decorate the street, run market days and publish local promotional papers.

It's not a panacea but it's a good start. I'll bet that just in my local suburb we have lots of notable people. As to who stops by on the way to or from MERC or Long Bay Beach,  the list would be a mile long.

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'GPS Bullets' Are Helping Cops Avoid High-Speed Chases - Newsy

Transcript: Law enforcement agencies are starting to roll out GPS bullets they can shoot at vehicles to avoid getting involved in high-speed chases. The GP
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Sounds a bit scary at first, but these bullets are GPS transmitters and are designed for use in tracking suspects who fail to stop when required by Police. Often Police are forced to alt a pursuit for safety reasons and they need to resort to other strategies.

These devices developed by StarChase are mounted behind the grill of the Police car and a laser is used to help sight it. Given the circumstances, shooting at a moving target, their hit rate can be improved, but it is helping US Police catch offenders and reducing crime whilst improving safety of all people, including the offender themselves.

Civil rights campaigners have been consulted and say that as long as that is the only purpose they are used for, they have no problem with the technology.

It seems that once again ideas that come from Science Fiction are becoming reality and around 100 Police Departments in the USA have now deployed this technology.
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This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. But as we discussed
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This use of a map on the Slate platform is very academic and slick. It's worth a watch for 2 reasons. First the way it uses maps. If you pause the animation, you can click on a dot and get the history of the specific ship you are looking at, not just seeing icons moving across a screen.

It's also a very interesting look at slavery. Having visited and stayed at plantations in Louisiana and Tennessee, you get to understand that this is all about people, but you also get the impression that most of it was about the United States, but in actual fact if you'll pardon the pun, they didn't cotton on to the concept of ownership of African people in the very beginning.

I think you will find this map tool and the story they use it to tell very interesting and eye opening.
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This Audi has a beautiful electric longboard hidden in its bumper

This Audi has a beautiful electric longboard hidden in its bumper | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
At Beijing's auto show this week, Audi unveiled its Connected Mobility Concept, a trucklet based on the production Q3.

But with this concept, the vehicle itself doesn't really matter
Luigi Cappel's insight:
At first glance it's, whatever how many people who would ride a long board would be able to afford a new Audi.

Then let's look at the pros and cons If you don't know how to handle a skateboard, put up the handle and you have a serious scooter.

If you want a mobile shopping trolley, load it up and it will carry your groceries and become a driverless shopping basket that follows your smartphone, like a 4 wheeled rat following the Pied Piper.

Great for commuters who can't get a park close enough to their destination. Issues: Is it legal on the footpath? Would you let it on the road? It can travel on batteries at up to 18km per hour.

How many people would be wanting to use it who don't know how to ride a scooter or a longboard? What 's the risk of crashes and injuries?

Kudos to Audi for coming up with a novel solution for the last mile. I can't see this being huge with the usual Audi buyer, but it it could be huge for the 2nd hand buyer!
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