Location Is Everywhere
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Tripbirds uses the social graph and check-ins to provide travel tips | Tnooz

Tripbirds uses the social graph and check-ins to provide travel tips | Tnooz | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
TLabs Showcase on travel startups featuring Sweden-based Tripbirds, a new travel service which taps into the social graph of Facebook and check-ins for travel advice.
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon

Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
I've been reading a book called 'Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do' by Tom Vanderbilt, which resonates very well with me. Now I'm no petrol head, but I still like driving my car and it is still m...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It only takes a little pain to have people hop in their cars. A wet day, having to stand on a bus, or having to stand on the side of the road and watch the bus go by. Driving is part of our culture. We are how we move. Even in cities where driving is impractical, like Tokyo, I have friends who still own a car, almost a status symbol because of the costs of even parking your car. They go driving in the weekend and enjoy the countryside.

The most popular and profitable radio time, even today when so many people are connected to their smartphones for entertainment, is drive-time. Of course this is also when we get our critical traffic reports.

We don't even want to get out of our cars. An estimated 22% of ALL restaurant meals in America are ordered through the window of a car.

I really like the footer, that a pedestrian is someone who has just parked their car.

Just last night I was reading in the news that sales of new passenger cars in New Zealand have gone up in the first months of this year by 3.6% breaking a 26 year record. Sales of commercial vehicles for the first four months in this country are up 14% on the same period last year.

Still think more people are ditching their cars?

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QLD's traffic conditions in the palm of your hand - myGC.com.au

QLD's traffic conditions in the palm of your hand - myGC.com.au | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Queensland Government has launched a new traffic and travel information system to help Gold Coasters – and others living and visiting the state – to better plan their journey before hitting the road. The new QLDTraffic website and smartphone app (download it now from the App Store or Google Play) replaces the old 131 940 …
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It has suddenly become a lot easier to navigate the traffic in Queensland thanks to a new website and Smartphone app for Apple and Android and it packs a lot of punch including the ability to customise it according to your needs.

Worried about driver distraction, set up the app according to your needs and the exceptions you have set up, for regular routes as well as one off's. It will send you notifications and audio information so that you don't need to read about events once you are on the road.

The app provides access to webcams, current, real time travel information as well as future events like scheduled road closures. You can filter information including crashes, floods, road closures and special events, traffic flow and congestion, hazards and restrictions. It includes all the current maps so you can plan your alternate route when unplanned events occur while you are driving.

The proof is in the pudding and of you are in Queensland, I would love to get some feedback on your experience with this free app. 
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How searching for a GPS location almost cost a man his life

How searching for a GPS location almost cost a man his life | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Iraqi expat recalls how he got involved in an accident which could have turned fatal
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's nice for once to see a balanced story that isn't saying the GPS made me do it. This man was driving on a busy multi lane highway at 80km per hour when he decided to enter his destination into the GPS.

Every time you startup your quality GPS you get a safety reminder telling you to select your address and mode before starting the car. You have to click a box saying you accept this as part of the terms and conditions of using the device.

In order to enter an address, confirm that it is the right one, confirm your mode of transport, potentially select from a number of different routes, accept the route and click start, you have taken your eyes off the road for a long time. If you took your eyes off the road for 30 seconds at that speed you would have traveled around 660 meters if my math is right. Over half a km on a busy highway that was so busy that he couldn't change lanes when he found he was about to crash. 

I won't defend any data entry into a phone while driving other than dialing an emergency number if you have to for safety reasons. 911 doesn't take long to enter if you don't have it preset or have voice control dialing. 

Not only was this guy very lucky, but the drivers in the vehicles all around him dodged a bullet too. The warning instructions on the flash screen are there for a reason, not just to fulfil a moral, ethical or legal requirement. 

Credit to him for sharing this safety story. 
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GPS Act Aims To Stop Warrantless Smartphone Tracking Done With Cell-Site Simulators

GPS Act Aims To Stop Warrantless Smartphone Tracking Done With Cell-Site Simulators | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Bipartisan bill makes warrantless tracking of smartphone users through cell-site simulators illegal.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I love living in a country where corruption is low and we are relatively safe, providing we use common sense in where we go and when.

I am all for any technology that legally (i.e. with a warrant) makes it easier for criminals and criminal suspects to be monitored. I have no problem with many of the technologies available being used legally.

Some of the problems we have to deal with include:

1. There are law enforcement officers that abuse their position. It's not just stuff we see on TV.

2. A lot of this technology can be purchased over the counter in security stores. Why is this legal.

3. Even more of this technology can be purchased online. 

4. Criminals can use this technology and I'm sure they do, because it is so easy to access. 

I'm so glad I live in New Zealand. 
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Amazon Echo: How People Use The Virtual Assistant?

Amazon Echo: How People Use The Virtual Assistant? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Amazon Echo speaker deploys the voice assistant Alexa to carry out several tasks. A new survey reveals that people use Alexa for simpler tasks for the home such as setting a timer, rather than enlisting its help to shop.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I love wildcards where companies develop solutions that end up being used in ways that they didn't conceive of, or did they?

Unfortunately Alexa isn't available on my side of the world yet (I checked again this morning) which is a real shame because I am really looking forward to trying it out.

This is going to be big, as the Virtual Personal Assistant takes advantage of knowledge based learning and big data. As we have found on the Gartner Hype Cycle, these things always take longer than we hoped. Google and others will of course also up their game as this becomes a new leap in the concepts that I described in my book 'Unleashing the Road Warrior'.

So what wildcard am I talking about? Apparently 36.5% of users tried to use it to find real time traffic information. I'm sure that's not what Amazon was thinking about when they designed it, but now their servers will be mapping out databases that provide this information and given that Alexa will know where you are, finding this info could be as simple as the back seat driver talking to the phone in the front using far-field voice recognition technology. 
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Can your smartphone make you a safer driver? - BBC News

Can your smartphone make you a safer driver? - BBC News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Drivers using mobile phones on the road are four times more likely to have an accident - but can apps also make us safer?
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Using gamification to get drivers to voluntarily lay off the use of their phone and drive efficiently and safely makes a lot of sense. 

There has been a lot of discussion about legislation to force cell phone manufacturers to disable phones from working in cars traveling over a certain speed. There are lots of reasons why this won't work.

The phone can't distinguish between a passenger and a driver.

Telecommunications companies will lose billions in revenue.

Customers will find hacks.

How do you distinguish between safety or navigation apps and apps considered unnecessary during driving. Who makes that call?

How do you apply exemptions to people who need their mobile phone under certain potentially unpredictable circumstances, for example emergency services, people taken somewhere against their will, voluntary Search & Rescue, people in an emergency environment like an earthquake or a mass evacuation as with the Oroville Dam? Imagine all the people trying to leave as instructed but needing to know where their friends and family are. 

Do 2,000 vehicles on the evacuation route pull over and stop to make calls, creating a massive traffic jam because their phone is blocked from making them over 10 miles per hour, or does the entire 200,000 people being evacuated in a critical life or death emergency get forced to drive at 9 miles per hour? 

Gamification makes lots more sense. New Zealand's eRoad Fleet Management company has had so much success with their gamified monitoring of safe driving that frequently drivers contact their dispatcher to find out their weekly position on the leader board, all wanting to be the best driver or the most improved driver. Research has proven time and again that whilst helpful, there doesn't have to be a prize.  

A voluntary system would allow people to make the call if they need to use their device while driving and in this system, it looks like they lose all the points they gained this week if the transgress. They therefore have a reason to not use their phone and bragging rights in their company if they do well. 

I have always felt that most people will do the right thing under the right circumstances. Sometimes they need more of an incentive than knowing they are doing the right thing, but it doesn't need to be much more.
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Fatigue test could stop drowsy drivers from getting behind the wheel

Fatigue test could stop drowsy drivers from getting behind the wheel | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
It is estimated driver fatigue plays a role in up to a third of all fatal accidents on Australian roads. Now, Victorian researchers are developing a roadside test to identify tired drivers and take them off the road.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great initiative. Using 'Smart glasses' drivers will be asked to undergo a short roadside test which will endeavor to identify drowsy drivers and if they are significantly tired, encourage them to take measures to keep themselves and other road users safe.

This is still work in progress and the results are not as yet highly definitive, but doing it at times and places when the risk is highest will increase awareness and return some degree of evidence back to researchers and Government departments.

I'm sure any driver stopped would be more conscious of the risks. A common response when people are stopped is that they weren't tired. According to the Sleep Health Foundation, a fifth of Australian adults have fallen asleep while driving and nearly a third drive while drowsy at least once a month. Those are disturbing numbers which are mirrored all over the world. 

As the software behind the glasses become more sophisticated and reliable, people will be surprised about the state they are in. Someone who says he isn't tired, but is driving with windows open, music blaring and a hot coffee must have some suspicion that they are not 100% alert. 

I blogged recently that there should be many more driver revivers on highways and that they can be almost cost neutral if there is an opportunity to upsell to barista coffee and food, using the lure of free filter coffee. A sign and a genuine free coffee and conveniences would be all it takes. Let's save some more lives.
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Six Best Practices for Use of Cruise Control in Commercial Transportation | Fuel Marketer News | Fuel Supply, Marketing, Distribution, Transportation, Logistics News, Information and Opinion

Six Best Practices for Use of Cruise Control in Commercial Transportation | Fuel Marketer News | Fuel Supply, Marketing, Distribution, Transportation, Logistics News, Information and Opinion | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was having a discussion with a friend last night about her elderly mother who is still driving a manual car and we were postulating that you are much more focused on all aspects of your driving.

This report demonstrates that cruise control and now adaptive cruise control potentially creates more opportunity for driver distraction as you are more relaxed, trusting that the car has everything in control. 

Here we have scientific evidence of the risks. These new technologies designed to help us drive more safely and compensate for unexpected behavior by the vehicle in front of us, also make us more lackadaisical and the problem is that it takes a significant amount of time to refocus our brains to a level appropriate for the conditions.  

I've heard similar comments from colleagues and others who are driving cars with these new technologies.
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The subscription economy: a new way to travel

The subscription economy: a new way to travel | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Our expectations have changed drastically: on-demand services increasingly sit at the top of consumer lifestyle essentials, with the likes of Spotify and Amazon Prime creating new business models which are leaving competitors behind
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I grew up in an environment where public transport was limited to times when there was peak demand and then of course it was overloaded. The consequence was that at the age of 15 when we got our driver's license, everyone started saving like mad for a car. I had times where if I missed the last bus, I would have to walk or hitchhike long distances. 

On a Sunday for example the last bus to my home from the city was at 7.25PM. I only had to walk the whole way once, 17km! Another time I got a lift with a teenager who wanted to show me his new skill of doing handbrake skids. When we hit the lamp post on my side of the car, I walked the final 5km. 

Owning and driving a car became a right of passage and still is for some people. Public transport in many areas still doesn't meet the needs of people to travel anywhere, any time they want or need to. There are of course taxis but not everyone can afford those. My last cab to the airport was $130. There are or course other solutions today and we are heading in the direction where with MaaS affordable transport could be available to everyone in urban areas at least.

Mobility as a Service seems to me to be the solution we have been waiting for. An on-demand model that is costed such that you can travel anywhere you want and anytime you want without paying a premium over owning your own vehicle and all that comes with it like insurance, maintenance, registration, replacing tyres and other components that wear and tear makes a lot of sense.

These days a lot of people have a vehicle because they feel they need one, but would be just as happy not having one. We all agree that most of us only use our vehicles for an hour or two a day and most of them depreciate from the moment you buy them, new  or used, which is not great for probably the second most expensive asset we buy and over a lifetime most of us buy and lose money on many vehicles. 
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La. man burglarizes home while wearing GPS ankle monitor

La. man burglarizes home while wearing GPS ankle monitor | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Police received a tip that John Davis was involved in a burglary and his ankle monitor confirmed his location
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This could seem like I'm flogging a dead horse but read the sub head in this story. "Police received a tip that John Davis was involved in a Burglary and his ankle monitor confirmed his location."

The GPS ankle bracelet sends of an alarm when the person leaves the perimeter or geofence surrounding their detention location.

Either the Police or their agent receives that alarm and should be confirming that he is in a permitted location or not. If not take action. But what seems to happen is that Police find out after the crime has been committed. 

How is this possible. If the system (including the monitoring isn't working, then I have to say, I don't want someone like this living anywhere near me, they should be locked up. We have a recidivist criminal doing what they do best. He was probably grinning from ear to ear as he was taking away the sanctity and security of a family's home. 
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Street outside primary to shut morning and afternoon to protect pupils

Street outside primary to shut morning and afternoon to protect pupils | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Officials in Camden, north London, will close the street outside St Joseph's Catholic Primary each morning and afternoon to protect children from pollution and traffic as they come and go from school.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Great idea, but without any scientific study behind it and being a narrow street, I'm not sure this achieves much more than promoting important points.

This is clearly not a busy street and if parents a dropping their kids of from cars, they are might even be breathing higher levels of carbon monoxide and other toxic fumes on a street with more traffic.

It also sounds like a lot of work, putting bollards out at certain times to stop traffic when there are electronic methods both for advising traffic when they can't use the road and capturing the details of any who ignore the ban.

Nevertheless the safety of our children is paramount and I am all for anything that protects children from any sort of harm.
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Shipping industry vulnerable to cyber attacks and GPS jamming

Shipping industry vulnerable to cyber attacks and GPS jamming | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The shipping industry is increasingly at risk from cybersecurity attacks and a gap in insurance policies is leaving them vulnerable.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
With a huge amount of freight and of course the tourist cruising industry, GPS jamming and spoofing has the potential to create havoc in international trade as well as safety of people on board these ships.

With the value of sea cargo, modern day pirates no longer need to just sit in wait along major trade routes on the East Coast of Africa, they can potentially attract and attack them anywhere on the ocean either by disabling their systems, or by spoofing their location such that they think they are of course and are then directed straight to pirates wanting to take over the ship or its contents. This is relatively low cost crime with huge returns and its a wonder we haven't seen more of it, unless it is being kept under wraps.

Navies, air forces, DARPA  and other military services have long been experimenting with these technologies both as aggressors and in self defence, but given the current political climate may not want to be sharing their developments such that potential future enemies might get hold of them. 

They are of course developing alternative technologies but these also come with similar risks. 

Maybe my grandfather's sextant still has some value, although I can't say I've seen one on the bridge of a modern ship and wonder if they even teach dead reckoning and other navigation techniques any more. t's like having GPS in your car, no one buys map books any more, well almost no one for the purpose of routing. They are more a generic guide for tourist attractions or tramping. 
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Calif. sex offender who killed 4 women while on GPS is sentenced to death

Calif. sex offender who killed 4 women while on GPS is sentenced to death | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Steven Dean Gordon smiled as he walked into a Santa Ana courtroom, but he appeared to show tears of remorse as he apologized for his crimes
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I find this story particularly distressing because this murderer was wearing an ankle bracelet while committing these crimes. In his statement he made a point that in a way the parole and probation officials were in part to blame.

That is possibly a bit harsh, but time and again we hear of failures by organisations using this technology who are not effectively monitoring the alarms on these systems, frequently citing lack of staff and budget. 

Obviously considered low risk this man and his partner in crime were not locked up for previous convictions. If the story is right they had already committed some of the 4 murders before they were fitted with the bracelets. These systems have tamper alarms, geofences that can trigger alarms if they leave their assigned locations and yet time after time we hear similar stories. No one notices the alarms.

Then we hear people say GPS anklets don't work. I have to say sorry but mostly they do, but perhaps the people responsible for monitoring should themselves be monitored. This technology saves the cost of putting these people in jail, but how does that weigh against 4 lives and the terror those people went through before they passed away? 
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Councils win £4m from DfT for travel and traffic tech projects | PublicTechnology.net

Councils win £4m from DfT for travel and traffic tech projects | PublicTechnology.net | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Some great initiatives are  being funded by the British Government for 19 councils who have placed bids for projects designed to help provide real time traffic information and reduce congestion, improving productivity for everything from general public, to public transport and freight.

Examples of approved projects include:
-A number of projects to help people find car parks more quickly. (It's estimated that up to 30% of urban congestion is people looking for a car park.)
-Advanced warning systems for Traffic Operations Centres where conditions suggest congestion is likely to occur so it can be dealt with proactively and potentially avoided altogether rather than reactively once it has formed.
-A connected bus system where buses talk to each other but also to infrastructure to help improve journey efficiency and encourage more people to use public transport because it provides a better experience than driving.
-A Smartphone app designed specifically for the freight industry to help large heavy vehicles avoid costly stop-start travel and improve efficiency.

Building roads and infrastructure is a race we can never win. I remember sitting in a plane coming home from London and reading an article in New Scientist in the 90's saying that as soon as a new motorway or segment has been opened it, it is full. We have all seen it. 

There is however a huge amount of efficiency to be gained by giving people trustworthy real time information when they need it, in an easy to access form relevant to each different type of customer. This is a great example of Government encouraging councils to come up with new ideas.

Many of these ideas aren't new but it's all in the timing. The Gartner Hype Curve talked about the Internet of Things 10 years ago, but it's only now that they are becoming cheap and easily accessible. They predicted mobile location based apps but they were only going to work when sufficient people had location aware Smartphones. 

Now we do. Just a little bit later than Gartner predicted, but they are rarely wrong. 
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Federal Agency Begins Inquiry Into Auto Lenders’ Use of GPS Tracking

Federal Agency Begins Inquiry Into Auto Lenders’ Use of GPS Tracking | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Regulators are investigating whether the devices unfairly violate a borrower’s’ privacy.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is not a new practice and unless they are doing something different in the subprime  market in the USA to what I see in this part of the world it is not about spying on customers and abusing their right to privacy, it is about helping them.

The model I have seen works like this:

A person hasn't got any money and they haven't got a car. To get to a job they want to apply for requires they have their own transport, perhaps because of the location, or the hours of work.

Because they have no money traditional car sales finance houses see them as high risk, which they are and won't loan them the money for the car. The examples in this article of defaulters being locked out of their car proves the fact that they are a credit risk. It's not the vendor's fault they haven't been paid. 

This is why I no longer own rental property, I was too soft when my tenants told me they had a tough week and could they pay some of the rent now and more next week when the next family crisis hits. I can't afford to pay their rent and I was too soft to evict them and their 4 children after the 3rd time.

So the deal is, the finance company gives them a 100% loan on the signed condition that they allow the vehicle to be tracked to make sure they are going to work and able to pay for the vehicle.

If they don't turn up for work for a week or the car is not where they said they live and payments are not made (note the article said the GPS isn't even turned on unless there is a payment default in some cases), the call centre rings them and asks if there is a problem they can help with.

They do not want the client to default because the car has depreciated the minute it left the dealership. They lose money if the client can't pay and they want the clients to continue to be clients in the long term.

It is certainly up to the lender to ensure that people monitoring the whereabouts of vehicles are well Police vetted and that the data is only used for the purpose it was intended for and this is easy to monitor in the software reporting system.

So let's think of the alternative, they go somewhere to borrow "instance finance" at exorbitant rates, lose their money and their car if they default. Possibly also have the debt collectors taking their TV, stereo, furniture and anything else as they would have signed a personal guarantee against their loan.

The other alternative (and remember these are mostly people who want to work and earn an honest living) is crime and unemployment benefits. 

If you borrow money, there are responsibilities and consequences. As long as the terms and conditions are respected both ways, this is a great system. Perhaps because this is relatively new in the subprime market, there should be legislation applied for privacy. However, until the vehicle is fully paid for, it is in shared ownership. My bank is a part owner of my home. If I don't pay the mortgage at a certain point they can lock me out, sell the house and if there is anything left over, give me the change. The fact that I have a sick child or any other reason, is irrelevant unless I have made contact with the bank, explained my problems and come up with a temporary arrangement. By the time this happens I would have been defaulting or some time. 

I just wonder about the traditional subprime systems that have been around for hundreds of years and their protection for customers who borrow money they can't pay back. Shylocks who resort to collecting their pound of flesh, knee capping, beatings, broken fingers, violent raids on property and threats against families, or being forced to commit crimes like burglary, prostitution or selling drugs to pay back loans with an ever increasing mountain of compound interest that turns law abiding citizens into criminals that should be 'looked into' because they certainly still exist. In fact on a ratio that is a much larger finance business than lending money on cars.

Any new system needs checks and balances and with this technology where 100% of a depreciating asset is being funded, I think the system is great. They don't want people to default, they want them to come back at least once more for a car upgrade as the start to regain control of their finances. What I do have a problem with is people who lend money with the express goal of lending it at such high rates and without controls that the customer will default and lose much more. 
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GPS-wearing cows may be clue to stopping cattle duffers

GPS-wearing cows may be clue to stopping cattle duffers | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
It is a crime evoking bushrangers and cattle duffers but stock theft has become a modern crime and researchers are hoping to find a technological solution.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I would have thought there was a cheaper solution than GPS and something this big would be pretty obvious for rustlers, but assuming it also has a tamper alarm if someone cuts through the strap, they would get an alert.

If you had a more discrete solution you wouldn't have to put it on all of your beasts. With GPS and a SIM card you wouldn't have to get into a dispute and risk a violent outcome, you could just tell the Police where to find them. 
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Police trace GPS Device on Night O.S.U. Student was kidnapped and killed

Police trace GPS Device on Night O.S.U. Student was kidnapped and killed | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Evidence gained from an ankle monitor worn by murder suspect Brian Golsby places him at the park where an OSU student was found murdered, according to prosecutors.The tracking data was the subject of a meeting between detectives and county prosecutors Wedn
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Finally and very rarely, we see the important question being asked. "Prosecutors are now asking Golsby's probation officer if anyone was tracking Golsby's whereabouts in real time."

The article doesn't say whether he was on home detention, but it does say that he had recently served a 6 year sentence for attacks on women. Quite often the stories are unclear as to whether people wearing GPS tracking anklets are in fact required to confine themselves to their home or very close to it.

As GPS anklets are used more and more to cope with overcrowded detention facilities, stories like this are almost a daily occurrence. 

IMHO you cannot have people released with tracking bracelets unless they are constantly monitored for location, tampering and operational status. People's lives are being put at risk and the technology is being treated with disdain, when in many of these cases the technology works fine, it's the monitoring that needs to be examined. 

Let alone the cost to the victims of people who are being tracked, what does it cost to take these people to court again and again and of course the cost of the technology and the monitoring that isn't consistently taking place but being paid for? 

Perhaps it is a combination of the wrong people being given the privilege of semi freedom and lack of accountability on the people managing the systems.

The investment in GPS tracking must be for a comprehensive end to end solution that is regularly audited. 
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TomTom Scoops Automotive Innovation Award

TomTom Scoops Automotive Innovation Award | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
As a past keynote at a national parking industry conference, I did a lot of research into this space which is a lot more interesting than you might think.

TomTom told us this was coming a year or so ago and the concept has great merit. Researchers have long told us that some 30% of urban traffic is made up of people looking for a car park. I can certainly attest to having been in that situation many times, curb side and also when commercial car parks have been full, which is usually when it is the carpark serving the venue you are going to for a show or a concert that is starting in 10 minutes.

Where they can get feeds from councils, car park owners (to whom telling you their car park is full is anathema, just in case someone leaves while you are on the way) and companies like Frog Parking who have sensors curbside to tell whether a spot is occupied or not this can be a great solution.

Where they are relying on people using their TomTom in-car or portable navigation devices, I'm not so sure they will always find a critical mass of TomTom users, which will of course determine in which cities around the world they launch this service. 

I stopped using my TomTom PND a year or two ago and started using  services on my mobile, my favorite of which (as a navigation app) is HERE. I got tired of having multiple devices and power cables (the battery stopped holding a decent charge after about a year). One of the sources of car park availability will be vehicles who use a TomTom and allow their location data to be shared. 

That way if you used navigation to get to your location and your vehicle stays in one place for a length of time following which you use it to start your next journey, TomTom will know that there is now a vacant car park space. Of course, similarly to services like Frog Parking (which lets you book a space so that other Frog Parking users can no longer see it) these systems can't guarantee the car park will still be available when you arrive there.

This continues to be an important and exciting direction for innovation and I'm sure in future we will see Parking as a Service solutions where so long as you are paying for a park, you have rights to it. As the sensor technology prices come down, it will be economical to replace parking meters with road side sensors. Carpark locating and booking smartphone apps could automatically charge you if you overstay your booking and could also reduce enforcement costs. If you don't use it, but have paid for it no revenue is lost.

There are of course other services as well such as Parkopedia which has a wealth of real time information including availability and pricing such as this example in Auckland https://www.parkopedia.co.nz/parking/auckland.

The key though lies in V2I type systems where your car knows where you are going, communicates with the parking infrastructue and will automatically route you to the nearest available carpark based on your parameters such as a trade off between price, distance to your destination and the urgency of your timing.

Solving this problem is important in creating thriving cities as well as healthy ones. Watch this space.
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UK could be shut out of super-accurate EU GPS system it helped to build

UK could be shut out of super-accurate EU GPS system it helped to build | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Brexit could leave the UK out of new EU-wide global positioning system (GPS) that went live in December after more than 15 years in development, with much of the cutting-edge work having been carried out by British companies.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's a bit like Trump's wall and how it impacts other countries. For example a third of New Zealand company Fisher & Paykel Health Care products are manufactured in Mexico. If Trump taxes products made in Mexico, the value of a New Zealand manufacturer of key health technology goes down and access to products like CPAP machines in the USA gets more expensive for Americans.

I'm not quite sure what this discussion means and doubt it would happen, but it is a similar analogy. Do GPS navigation devices stop working when they are in Great Britain? Do devices set up to work with Galileo satellites only work on the continent? What about Europeans traveling on a Great Britain road trip? How do you distinguish a phone or device, is it locked out based on location or citizenship of the owner? 

How educated were the referendum voters on the potential consequences of Brexit?
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Tesco boss tells how merger with Booker will boost click-and-collect

Tesco boss tells how merger with Booker will boost click-and-collect | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Tesco and Booker deal will more than double the number of click-and-collect locations. And it formed a key part of the strategy that led to the proposed takeover.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This makes so much sense, of course it is just another stepping stone. I saw a story this morning about a robot that is able to handle individual soft fruit without damaging it. 

It's all about choices and economy of scale. At one end we have the boutique grocery store with the best of everything for those who can afford it. Then we have the grocers who focus on range and variety while others focus on price; and at the far end we have a mix of delivery and click and collect. Something for everyone.

At the delivery and click and collect we will eventually shift to warehouses that customers don't go into at all, this will reduce their overheads and if they are smart, they will not charge a significant premium for the convenience when they employ fewer staff. Traditionally grocers spent a truck load of money buying top sites they weren't going to use, to stop their competitors getting a top location. If customers aren't going to go to the store, it only needs a location that is convenient for pickup or distribution, It doesn't need to attract customers by its high profile location. That has a huge impact on overheads, although the property investments in many cases also became very profitable and gave the retail co-ops another security level for their retirement or family empire. 

Grocery has always fascinated me. It is a license to print money and at the higher end, a very sophisticated business. If I had multiple lives, I would have gone into grocery having learned all about the business while selling top end scanning systems; teaching millionaires how to make money and watching people with no money become freehold owner operators in 18 months!

Once upon a time it was location, location, location. Today it is about trust, convenience and finding new ways to upsell, range and maintain a relationship. Many retailers struggling to make a profit could do well to learn from how the grocery business keeps reinventing itself. Remember put the nappies next to the beer shelf. 
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Fasten Your Seat Belts: Carmakers Prepare for the Biggest Change Since the Model T

Fasten Your Seat Belts: Carmakers Prepare for the Biggest Change Since the Model T | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Car sharing systems run by car manufacturers are rolling out throughout America from brands including Ford, GM, Honda, Audi and BMW. A great way to get more cars out there without having to get sales. There are of course risks, but the cost of a car to a manufacturer without any margins is way less than for anyone else.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Many innovations are evolutionary rather than revolutionary and this seems to me to be a great way to start devolving car ownership and heading towards a MaaS environment. Yes there are maintenance costs and some people will attempt to abuse cars, but there will be bonds and monitoring systems in the cars for this.

I watched a presentation from Jucy Rentals about people abusing motor homes in the outback of Australia, where the drivers of the vehicle were alerted that the company knew where they were, how fast they were driving and that they were driving as though they were in a go cart rather than a very expensive vehicle designed for comfort not boy racing. Using satphone communications because they were out of range of cellphone coverage, they were told that the next time they infringed, a significant amount of money would be deducted from their bond. The driving behavior changed almost immediately.

This is of course a step towards the driverless car because if I want a car to take me from home to the airport, I don't want to have to figure out how to get to the 'central location' where a car is available, if I have to drive there, I might as well have a car and drive straight to the airport because I don't want to take my luggage on a bus not designed for people with large luggage items.

When the nearest car drives itself to me and costs a lot less than the $130 it cost me for a cab from home to the airport, I'm sold. When you take out the value chain margins of the car manufacturer selling to a dealership which in turn sells it to a rental company, the payback is pretty quick and the brands that gain supremacy in this market could be well placed when they and the market are ready for their autonomous cars.

In the meantime if we can tie the dots together so I can get from home to the 'central location' where the 'car sharing' vehicle is, using a MaaS model, like a local shuttle or ride share that takes people a short distance, that might be able to bridge the gap. 

Of course these systems are being established in the big cities where there is a large population, in many cases who don't own cars and are resident in the 'central locations'. I could even see businesses considering using these services, with public transport for short urban visits and car sharing for trips where there are groups traveling with luggage. 

In those areas the payback will be rapid especially with the car manufacturers owning the rental companies. For us down under the ROI period will be much longer, but it would certainly be viable in the city. It might be Japanese used imports rather than new cars given the overheads and the fact that car manufacturing has all but ceased Downunder. Having said that a lot more people are living in the CBD's now.
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Distracted-driving bill aims 'to stop the carnage on our roads today'

Distracted-driving bill aims 'to stop the carnage on our roads today' | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Minnesota and other states struggle to rein in inattentive drivers.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is an excellent and detailed article showing differences between laws in various states and also the increase in numbers of fines handed out which don't seem to be working very well.

They say that education was what got people wearing seat belts, not penalties. I wonder what percentage of people pay their fines and carry on using their phones. Maybe they should use some reverse psychology like the pictures on some cigarette packets showing what tobacco does to your lungs.

Maureen Vogel of the Illinois-based National Safety Council, made a very good point about where the distraction is. She said the distraction is in the brain, not the hands. Now I don't fully agree, but her point is that you are mentally distracted. Next time you have a phone call think back over it and how aware you were of your surroundings. 

Vogel said, if it was about taking your hand off the wheel, they would have banned manual cars and trucks years ago because one hand spends a lot of time on the gear lever. Where I disagree slightly is that if you are changing gear, you can still quickly put your hand on the steering wheel. If you are holding a phone, you have to put it somewhere safely before you grab the steering wheel and that delays your ability to respond. 

She has a point, but I don't buy it 100%. If you absolutely must use your phone when driving, use it hands-free. But try the exercise I suggested earlier, Replay a phone call, maybe in the car, or in a busy office and then note down everything that went on around you while you were on the phone. Of course it's relative, but being honest with yourself is a good starting point. 
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Wearable AI will help judge the tone of conversations

Wearable AI will help judge the tone of conversations | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have made a wearable device that can predict if a conversation is happy or sad.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Not quite location based, but think of the potential uses. From dating to business meetings, this could have all sorts of potential if it is accurate.

I'd really like to know how they go with cultural norms because a quite monotone conversation could be normal in some places. 

The thought that this could appear on Apple and Android watches before long is really interesting, but I'd really like to see the statistics in the real world.

Forget about the mood ring or looking into someone's eyes during a conversation, leave it up to the watch, but watch out if the watch gets it wrong!
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Bose headrest speakers "whisper" directions into driver's ears

Bose headrest speakers "whisper" directions into driver's ears | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
At last month’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Bose showed off its latest Bose Aware technology: a pair of 2.5in headrest speakers linked to the infotainment unit in the dash. Report by Matt Bingham for Driving.co.uk
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I used to have a clever car navigation system on my mobile that turned down the volume of any application other than phone calls in order  to give me navigation instructions.

At first it was a very cool tool and made sure I didn't miss turns, but when it would say, turn left in 500 meters, turn left in 300 meters, turn left in 100 meters, I eventually turned the feature off and used my car stereo for entertainment.

This new concept from Bose is a great idea. I'm not sure I'd like to have left turn advice in my left ear and right turn in the right ear. I think the surprise factor could be distracting if I wasn't paying attention to the map. 

I'm sure they will have more features up their sleeves to make sure you are alert and not falling asleep and perhaps also new features like proximity sensor alerts when a car is in your blind spot. The question will be compatibility and which brands of car nav will support this functionality. This would certainly appear to be a top of the market option where price is not the consideration, knowing the markups car marques add to OEM accessories.

It would certainly remove the complaints I'd get from passengers listening to the news or singing along to their favorite song.
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Wet Mountain Tribune - Page 7 - 2/2/2017

Wet Mountain Tribune - Page 7 - 2/2/2017 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Wet Mountain Tribune - Newspaper of record for Custer County, Colorado
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Wow, this story reads like something out of a 1960's newspaper. Colorado road deaths up 24% in 2 years is one thing, but half of the deaths were people not wearing seat belts, a third of all deaths were alcohol related and 125 of the deaths were motorcycle riders with most not wearing helmets. I guess they at least felt the freedom of the wind blowing through their hair. 

According to the article, CDOT says one in every 33 Colorado drivers will be involved in some sort of crash this year.

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Uber GPS tracks alleged thieves who stole car, assaulted driver

Uber GPS tracks alleged thieves who stole car, assaulted driver | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Two men accused of attacking an Uber driver with a spanner and taking off with his car are tracked down by police using the ride-booking service's GPS.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Two Australians qualify for consideration in the Darwin Awards. The whole concept of Uber is based around the ability of being able to track their vehicles in real time. So that's the car they choose to jack. They might as well have got some exercise and walked straight to jail.

Well I guess they put Tanah Merah in Logan on the map.
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