Location Is Everywhere
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2clams Unleashes conTAGion – You’re IT!, the Next Evolution in Location-Based Games

2clams Unleashes conTAGion – You’re IT!, the Next Evolution in Location-Based Games | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

I installed it on my iPAD but it keeps crashing. Watch this space. Zombie lovers everywhere rejoice! The real zombie apocalypse is finally here. The quick will survive while the slow will be caught. Find out whether you'll end up as a zombie snack. (2clams Unleashes conTAGion – You’re IT!

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lordclam's comment, December 22, 2011 2:59 PM
Hi Luigi,
Thanks for the info. We (unfortunately) caught this bug when it went live. We're a very small developer and we already have it fixed. We're working with Apple to get our update out to address this and if there was some way we could contact you directly, we'd be happy to provide you with some free clams to make up for this.
Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon

Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
I've been reading a book called 'Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do' by Tom Vanderbilt, which resonates very well with me. Now I'm no petrol head, but I still like driving my car and it is still m...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It only takes a little pain to have people hop in their cars. A wet day, having to stand on a bus, or having to stand on the side of the road and watch the bus go by. Driving is part of our culture. We are how we move. Even in cities where driving is impractical, like Tokyo, I have friends who still own a car, almost a status symbol because of the costs of even parking your car. They go driving in the weekend and enjoy the countryside.

The most popular and profitable radio time, even today when so many people are connected to their smartphones for entertainment, is drive-time. Of course this is also when we get our critical traffic reports.

We don't even want to get out of our cars. An estimated 22% of ALL restaurant meals in America are ordered through the window of a car.

I really like the footer, that a pedestrian is someone who has just parked their car.

Just last night I was reading in the news that sales of new passenger cars in New Zealand have gone up in the first months of this year by 3.6% breaking a 26 year record. Sales of commercial vehicles for the first four months in this country are up 14% on the same period last year.

Still think more people are ditching their cars?

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Can Facebook recommend friends just on you phone's GPS?

Can Facebook recommend friends just on you phone's GPS? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Reports have emerged that the Californian social media giant is using people's phone data (pictured) to suggest new friends which have no other connection to them.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Pick your friends and be savvy about the technology you are using.

It's interesting to see this type of story in an age where we have all sorts of privacy laws about who you can approach with direct marketing; and being clear on what their information will or won't be used for. Yet social media giants seem to be able to act with impunity where people agree to the small print which is so long that they typically don't read it.

Many of us agree that we are happy to sacrifice a degree of privacy for convenience. I want the DIY to know that I am a prospect for their weed-eater stock problem, because I bought a lawn mower from them. I'm happy to give them permission to make me an offer because I am within a couple of miles of the store.

I am not so happy about a social media giant suggesting that I might want to meet a stranger, who knows someone I know based on that fact and our proximity to each other in location.

At the #NZSOMO conference last week, a common thread was that although many delegates and presenters use Facebook to market services and information, most of limit the number of 'friends' we personally have on the application and mostly use it for friends and family, not for business networking or communicating with strangers.

Recommending friends is fine. Once we got over scarcity marketing (remember when you had to ask a friend to give you access to a Google account?) recommending people you might know based on mutual friends and family is cool. I'm not so sure recommending people based on more tenuous links combined with location is.

Its one thing if I check in, say at a concert, to be told which of my friends are also there; it's something totally different to tell me that I might want to make friends with a total stranger because we both like music and share an acquaintance and are at the same event, especially if I haven't checked in or made any attempt to let Facebook know I am there.

What do you think? Is it cool or intrusive or perhaps even dangerous?


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Fighting crime: Multan police to launch phone app - The Express Tribune

Fighting crime: Multan police to launch phone app - The Express Tribune | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The user would have to enable GPS so the police may locate them
Luigi Cappel's insight:
More and more solutions are being developed that allow people to report everything from health and safety issues, vehicle breakdowns, road potholes, and crime.

Panic buttons have featured on systems for public health workers and security personnel for many years. It is great to see more personal solutions being developed, however, as has been frequently evidenced with solutions such as GPS ankle bracelets for people on home detention, they are only as good as the resources available to monitor them.

This is both a congratulatory and a cautionary notice. The ability to take photos that are time stamped and Geo-located is wonderful. So is a panic button, as commonly used by at risk elderly people or people with health conditions that may require urgent attention.

The risk is reliance on those solutions if the service provider has insufficient resources to respond in an appropriately quick, safe and reliable manner. Security services are always stretched. A key factor is the type of need, especially with police services. Key questions are, is a person in danger of being hurt, or is it property that is being stolen or damaged. The former is time critical and a solution like this implies that there is resource to get to the correct (and possibly shifting) location as quickly as possibly. The latter may be more about getting evidence that can be used to recover stolen goods and apprehend criminals through evidence.

Often people think technology will solve. The problem, however it is simply an enabler in the value chain.
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NC driver distracted by GPS crashes into house, troopers say

NC driver distracted by GPS crashes into house, troopers say | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Troopers responded to a house on Alamance Church and Nelson Farm Roads around 2:45 Sunday afternoon.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So here we go again, has it only been a week?  #TheGPSMadeMeDoIt The person almost got it right. There was a STOP sign ahead. Wouldn't it have been a good idea to STOP at the STOP sign and then look at the GPS?

Maybe we should have a driver distraction Darwin Award.
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Fighting Traffic Shockwaves With Platooning

Fighting Traffic Shockwaves With Platooning | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I call it the concertina effect, traffic slows down because someone doesn't merge like a zip, or because they are rubbernecking an accident on the other side of the motorway. Everyone behind them slows down and then when they get past whatever the reason was for the slow=down, everyone speeds up again. Others call it the shock-wave effect which is fundamentally what it is.

A consortium in the Netherlands (click on the link for the video) are testing connected cars in a platooning configuration to not only prove that they can impact on this problem which adds hours to people's commute, but also to show how easy it is for cars to attach and detach from a platoon.

When they form a platoon, the lead vehicle takes over and the vehicles behind are effectively controlled by the car in front. It gets information from Traffic Information Services that tell it there is a traffic jam ahead and the platooning vehicles slow down. By the time they get to where the traffic jam was, it is over and they are able to continue.

The impact of this smooths out the shock-waves and has a beneficial effect on all traffic, who can potentially get to their destination sooner, or at least having used less fuel and experienced less stress.

Obviously if it is a serious jam, they may not be able to ride it but having watched a lot of traffic cameras and spent many hours commuting or traveling on motorways, it's obvious that this shock-wave effect has a significant impact on people's journeys and occurs constantly.

It's also obvious that platooning works by minimizing drag or the impact of wind on vehicles. You see it in motor racing and it is one of the big areas of development in the freight industry. Less drag means less fuel, less pollution and reduced stress when the vehicles are more or less driving themselves.

On the A58, like many of the Dutch motorways I traveled on last year, they have variable speed systems, designed to encourage drivers to slow down to smooth out the speed of vehicles and reduce the stop - start shock-waves. Interestingly most local drivers hate them, but begrudgingly agree that they work.

In this test environment, the vehicles got the signal to slow down or speed up electronically from transmitters on the side of the road and of course if the vehicles in front slow down automatically, so must the vehicles behind them. A small number of vehicles using these systems benefit a much larger volume of traffic.

We may not see many fully autonomous vehicles on our roads in the next few years, but technologies like platooning will become commonplace IMHO in areas where people travel a lot on urban motorways and busy long freeways.
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What can we learn from shortcuts?

What can we learn from shortcuts? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
How do you build a product people really want? Allow consumers to be a part of the process. "Empathy for what your customers want is probably the biggest leading indicator of business success," says designer Tom Hulme.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This one is for my colleagues and people in any industry that is involved with services to customers. Check out the badge that says The Customer is Always RIGHT in the video. I've been to a lot of businesses where that is how the customer service people think and behave.

I had engineers in Japan who told me to find better customers when one of my major clients perceived there was a quality issue with one of their products. There actually wasn't, but once the perception was there, it was too late.

This gaijin booked a flight to Narita and a train to R&D the following day to save a multi-million dollar order and 'encouraged them' to make their product suit what my customers wanted which resulted in our saving my multi-million dollar order and won the manufacturer subsequent sales in other countries of many hundreds of thousands of units over a thousand dollars apiece.

This TED Talk is only 7 minutes and if you are in the transport industry, in government, urban planning, or in fact any industry that has customers (yes tax payers and rate payers are also customers) then I recommend you invest a coffee break to watch this video, then I challenge you to think about how to use it.

The fact is that the customer is always right. You can take a different perspective if you wish, but being right with no customers, or having them ignore your assumption based design isn't my idea of success.
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Meet Synthia, the virtual driving school for autonomous cars

Meet Synthia, the virtual driving school for autonomous cars | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A detailed, video game-like simulation of a city environment called Synthia is proving a cheap and highly effective way of training AIs for self-driving cars quickly, cheaply, and with nearly no human input.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's an nice cartoon simulation, but I want to see the real video. In the simulation I noted:
-Ambient light. Cool, that's a real problem in only a few parts of the world, like New Zealand. As are long periods of sun-strike as a consequence of the low zenith of the sun, especially in winter, but also all year round which has caused problems for other technologies, like supermarket scanners (ask me about it)
-It didn't seem to slow down for speed humps. Very bad for car suspension as taxi drivers at airports keep telling me.
-It didn't seem to slow down for pedestrian crossings. As we all know, a large percentage of people walk with 2 eyes on their smartphone and relying on peripheral vision for way-finding. The law says they have right of way on a pedestrian crossing that doesn't have signals.
-It appeared to be good in snow and other weather conditions, but this appears to be based on locations where it already has great information about existing street furniture. The problem there is things can change daily. Road maintenance for example can be unplanned, or may proceed at different times to what is planned. In many cases that information is not shared with car navigation and other data sources and it is also not specific. It may say that there is a project happening on Monday to Friday between the hours of 09:00 and 16:00, but not that there will be a digger and a big hole in the middle of the road surrounded by cones as there are outside my driveway right now. In bad weather such as snow, the systems might not see holes surrounded by cones or covered with cloth.
-People are unpredictable, look at the number of crashes where cars (driven by intelligent people) hit parked vehicles, crash into trees and buildings where there are no other vehicles involved, or people just walk into the path of a car that can't stop in time.
In 50 years or so when almost all cars (other than classics) have V2V communications, normal driving will be more predictable for autonomous vehicles, but a lot of people are predictably irrational.
If there were zones that were only allowed to be used by vehicles with compatible communications technology, that could work, but you would still have to bar pedestrians from those locations.
This is also so easy in a perfect world, but humans are not perfect and they train AI's. These simulations are important and we will enjoy many fringe technologies that will come from this testing that can go into people driven cars and make them safer as interim steps. That will save money and lives.
It's interesting to see how well people can walk on bust Manhattan streets while looking at their mobiles, but we have all seen people walk into poles. 2 steps or a sudden slip onto a road with an average speed of 30mph.
If you think driverless cars will become commonplace in the next 10 years, I think you are being overly optimistic. I have spent a lifetime asking "when the benefits are so obvious, why aren't we all doing it?" The answer is because we are people and we are not highly motivated to change and especially not when the change is expensive or inconvenient. Of course without idealists nothing would change and today its no longer the minority of us who want change.
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Waze to help drivers avoid tough intersections: Does GPS make us safer?

Waze to help drivers avoid tough intersections: Does GPS make us safer? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Navigation app Waze has unveiled a new feature that will help drivers avoid difficult intersections, the latest technological attempt to make the roads safer.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Not what I expected to read coming from The Christian Monitor, but why not?

I can relate. I bypassed the whole town of Birmingham Mississippi because of their crash statistic rate heading from New Orleans to Nashville. It's different when you're a local and know what lane you need to be in and when, or how to get from one to another in traffic like this.

However, in New Zealand Waze is probably the weakest and least used of the GPS routing solutions and mostly used by people who want to drive at illegal and unsafe speeds and tell each other where the Police are with radar guns.

Other than the side effect that this often causes congestion as people drive 20 miles an hour below the speed limit, those are actually the places I'd feel safer driving....
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Coles driver ‘follows GPS’ and flips truck on Sydney road

Coles driver ‘follows GPS’ and flips truck on Sydney road | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A truck driver escaped injury this morning when his truck flipped after smashing into an overpass in Sydney’s inner-city.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
#TheGPSMadeMeDoIt

I think it should be a hashtag, I hear it so often. I've already blogged on this type of scenario this week http://bit.ly/1UTIdpZ ; and identified that in Australia there are both Fleet Management systems and GPS navigation systems designed specifically for trucks.

If they use those dedicated systems, in most situations they will get a bonus warning. Bonus, I mean in addition to the signs on bridges and overpasses that state the height restrictions.

I feel for the driver, but bottom line is, as a professional, you take on a responsibility and one of those is understanding your load and the environment you are in.

I'm sure truck GPS, while better suited to the environment still won't get it right every time, but it should most of the time if you have a reputable product.
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LA’s Using Energy Savings From LED Streetlights to Charge Electric Vehicles

LA’s Using Energy Savings From LED Streetlights to Charge Electric Vehicles | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Los Angeles is using electricity saved by LEDs to power up electric cars.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is an innovative move from LA with collaboration between the City, the DOT and the Department of Water and Power. They replaced power hungry sodium streetlights with LED's and used the savings to fund purchase and installation of EV charging stations.

One of main barriers to people investing in electric cars is range and there are not a lot of places to charge your cars. This initial project won't make a huge dent in that capacity, but it shows leadership and forethought and good use of taxpayers money.

Look for initiatives around the world as we look to replace polluting oil based vehicles with cleaner or zero emissions.

Minor point is considering how the power is generated. In New Zealand most of the power is generated from geothermal plants, therefore the electricity is also pretty much green and sustainable. If your power to save your emissions comes from coal powered plants, you may be robbing Peter to pay Paul.
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Domino's using GPS to track pick-up customers

Domino's using GPS to track pick-up customers | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

optimization Oven to mouth  optimisation.

Luigi Cappel's insight:
I wish my local Chinese takeaway would do this. Don't get me wrong they are really good, but they are old school and really busy because their food and service are great. On the other hand they have 2 teenage daughters that would really 'get it'. They might have greater ambitions than the family business, but I digress.

The point is, how often do you order take-out, especially on a winter's night and either pick it up either cold because it took you longer than you thought to get there, or a misunderstanding of the time you ordered it for, or have to wait another 10 minutes because they are really busy.

Of course this does raise the expectation bar of the customer, but so did giving away meals for free if they took extra long to prepare in fast food stores and customers had to wait.

Pizza is a highly competitive business and providing the perfect experience is going to appeal to customers. If they can deliver on expectations the marketing opportunities and business growth potential IMHO is huge.

How often do people decide not to buy food on their way to something time based like a sporting match, concert, movie or other event and decide not to because they don't have time.

Whether they take full advantage of this or not we will have to see, but it is a very smart move. It also means that having their customer's details, the segway into location based marketing becomes very easy. Notification: You're in the area, we have your favorite garlic cheese crust meat lovers pizza almost ready for you with a free drink. Click here and come and get it!"
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GPS Reliance Gets Trucks Stuck, and Vermont is Fed Up | Transport Topics Online

GPS Reliance Gets Trucks Stuck, and Vermont is Fed Up | Transport Topics Online | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Starting July 1, truckers who get stuck in Smugglers Notch — a scenic, narrow, winding road in Vermont — will be subject to fines of up to $2,000 for a first offense.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
People like this give GPS a bad name. You have to look at what is outside the windscreen people!

Of course the question is, if this map data is the same data used by driverless trucks in future where there is no driver looking through the windscreen and if their intelligence systems can't read or interpret the data in time, will they do the same thing?

There are roads that are designated as unsuitable for certain types of vehicle, but I'm not aware of navigation data-sets designed to advise on truck limitations and there are so many of them, including narrow winding roads, weight restrictions, number of axles, height restrictions, width dimensions, unpaved roads and then off course things like winter conditions such as snow, black ice, floods and slips.

Top Fleet Management systems do their best to have good data, especially speed restrictions (not the same as speed advisories for tight corners or difficult road segments) but many smaller truck companies or owner operators don't have those and they will still not know about changing conditions, temporary or sudden changes. Map data currency is also an issue.

The fines will help, but looking at the pictures that go with this link, I suspect the damage and recovery cost to the vehicle and the revenue loss due to the day's unfinished work are greater than the fine.

I don't believe this is GPS reliance at all, it is inattention by the driver if their are sufficient sign warnings. The same applies to warnings on corners. If their is a 20mph advisory on a corner on a 60mph road, you won't find it on the GPS. If you do 60mph and drive off the road and down a bank, you can't blame the GPS, it's simply a navigation aid.

I suspect in many cases the issues are driver fatigue, distraction or inattention and lack of familiarity with the road. The latter being extremely common, especially in the US where many drivers traverse the country, going where the freight jobs and back-hauls are, meaning that they will be frequently driving on roads they don't know.

The GPS made me do it will not stand up in court.
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Prey | Track & find stolen Phones, Tablets and Laptops

Prey | Track & find stolen Phones, Tablets and Laptops | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Free, proven tracking software that helps you track, lock and recover your laptop, phone and tablet when stolen or missing. For Mac, Windows, Linux, iPhone, iPad & Android.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Yesterday I read a Facebook post from an associate saying that on Monday his laptop had been stolen and on Friday he had it back thanks to a free software application called Prey and quick action by Police who had a fairly easy job to do.

A lot of the time theft becomes just an insurance claim, but how often do we read stories like "priceless wedding, trip or family photos that aren't backed up"; and left my phone in a taxi and they say they haven't got it." Technology is easy to replace and the paperwork and case files mean Police don't have the resources to try to solve every theft crime.

There is also the issue of having to prove the device is in fact stolen, so how about the ability to send a message to the device screen that locks on a message like "This device has been stolen from xxx, please contact via this email address to arrange it's return." It also provides the ability to remotely wipe the device, the same as Where's my iPhone and similar apps.

This free app (which also offers premium services), allows you to monitor the location of up to 3 devices. Any more you have to pay for, but they have to make money too right?

So the app search report not only told him where his laptop was, but also photos of the people using it (as they were preparing to sell it), It also provided details of their email, their Facebook and Trade Me details, lots of photos of their home and of course most importantly, their address.

They met the Police at the location where the laptop was recovered intact and arrests were made. Someone else responded to the Facebook post with a similar story, which confirms what I have frequently said They lost their iPad but were able to provide similar details to the Police who also found lots of cash, marijuana and methamphetamine on the premises of the lowlifes who stole it.

So instead of putting more time into my blog this morning before work, I installed Prey on my laptop. They also support Android, iOS and Linux, so I will be installing it on my iPhone and iPads as well. Yes there are lots of similar apps, although this has some nice added value features.

I don't usually promote products on this blog, but in this case, with the recommendation and having now installed it myself, I'm keen to share it with you. The installation took around 3 minutes, so don't say you wish you had time,
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Tesla driver killed in autopilot crash said the technology was 'great'

Tesla driver killed in autopilot crash said the technology was 'great' | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Tesla driver killed in a crash while in autopilot model happened to be a proponent of autonomous driving.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a sad but timely reminder that we not there yet and that we should not overestimate the capability of today's technology.

Not that long ago I was told a Tesla drove itself over the Auckland Harbour Bridge. The interesting thing is that as the narrative on the video attached to this story illustrates, Tesla's autopilot is just that, its not an autonomous vehicle, although it is a stepping stone in that direction. It expects the driver to be in a position to take over when needed.

In this case the car computer didn't recognise the danger and therefore didn't take action of any kind including alerting the driver, let alone put on the brakes and a Tesla fan sadly passed away in the aftermath.

I have written many blogs on driverless cars http://bit.ly/298C5Mg and this illustrates one of the concerns I have in New Zealand particularly with ambient light.

Classic point in case in this accident where it appears that neither the driver, nor the Tesla's cameras, 'saw' the truck and trailer turning in front of it.

Auckland commuters experience long periods of sun-strike because the sun stays low on the horizon, particularly for East and Westbound commuters. Given that your eyes are very close to your brain, an alert driver's synapses don't have send a signal far to alert the driver there is danger ahead and initiate action.

Try an experiment (as a passenger) and point your phone's camera lens into the sun at that angle and see what the car computer is trying to deal with. Don't do it for too long or you will damage the camera, it doesn't like looking straight into the sun any more than you do. There has been quite a lot of research in roadside data collection that has been hampered by light conditions including reading safety and speed signs.

Whilst this is a tragic accident of the sort that frequently happens to good drivers who may be momentarily distracted, it's an ever greater risk in this sort of vehicle under the ambient light conditions we face.

I don't think we are quite as close as we think to safely being driven around in a car without a steering wheel and I also fear that early adopters may underestimate their limitations.
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Mesa company uses GPS to bust workers stealing thousands of dollars worth of insulation

A Mesa company used GPS to bust two workers stealing thousands of dollars in insulating from them.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I love these stories. #Catchingcrooks with GPS is so easy, low cost (relatively speaking) and massively reduces the costs of investigation whilst increasing convictions. What have you got that you could protect?
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GPS Navigation Takes Turn For The Better

GPS Navigation Takes Turn For The Better | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A crowd-sourced navigation app will soon help drivers avoid left-turns and difficult intersections. Waze is also getting a test feature to avoid high-crime
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Well it's a turn in the right direction. But I'm not sure I get it. Wouldn't you use the crowd sourced data of millions of users to identify the best or most popular routes, especially during busy times rather than ask a select group. These difficult intersections aren't bad all the time or even consistently at certain times of day.

In addition to that, the local DOT will be managing intersection signals on the basis of transport needs. If a 3rd party then starts to control traffic in a different way to what the traffic engineers have set up for, it wouldn't seem likely to make things better.

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for asking users to share data. TomTom has done it for years and provides the ability for customers to send them information about changes or errors to their data. I've used it myself, when stationery and parked.

The greater problems for me with Waze traditionally are 2-fold. First whilst it has great safety features built-in to stop the driver from entering information about the road or incidents, or (most popular) where the cops with speed cameras are, it can easily be abused in that way. The software doesn't provide an instant capture tool for location which means that often events are shown a couple of miles away from their actual location. It also takes a long time to enter.

I once saw a Google video at a conference where they showed how they were able to map NYC in 24 hours from taxi GPS units. Surely they know where they are going. That was probably about 10 years ago. I would have expected their big data to contain all the information they need by now.

The problem is real time. Google's algorithms tend to have a high focus on historic data. School holidays are the classic. Google Driving tells me there is congestion on part of my journey when there isn't, and that its free flowing when its a car-park before and after school vacations which illustrates my point.  This is a big fail during peak traffic times when it tells people to take rat runs they don't need and potentially makes congestion worse.

The other problem with Waze for me is that there are insufficient users where I live in NZ. That means that not enough people are reporting information. On top of this a very high percentage of cars are only occupied by the driver, so of course they can't share any information unless they allow Google to capture it, anonymously of course:)

I'd love to know, given that Google owns Waze, why they don't just combine the best features of each into one app.
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Argos turn to technology in bid to stay healthy | Toronto Star

Argos turn to technology in bid to stay healthy | Toronto Star | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The team is believed to be among the first in the CFL to adopt GPS technology, a satellite-assisted tool for tracking the workload coaches place on players at practice.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Let's follow this story a little farther. This replaces the guys who sit on the sideline tracking how many meters each player has run, explosive runs, defensive or attacking hits in tackles and what they were doing when they got injured. It will help coaches and physios to understand playerss limits and of course maximize their potential.

Then lets think about where this can go in the future. Here's a few ideas:

1. Video cameras can follow particular players via their GPS location. If you have a particular player you like, pick the TV channel that focus' on that player. If you have a 100" TV or go to a sports bar, you could watch the game on one screen and individual players on others. It would be cheap to have more cameras, because they would be autonomous, they would know exactly where to focus.

2. For training, this would be brilliant because not only could each athlete review their own personal performance, but they could also view the game of their opposite number for next week's match.

3. Next add something like a GoPro into the headgear of players  and you can watch the match from their perspective, be right in the game.

4. I see this happening in other sports, first. I'll leave it up to you to imagine,  but think about how far Samsung has come with Samsung Gear VR (Google it and buy it for peanuts from your favorite consumer electronics store). The low cost will inevitably make sales go crazy. Imagine the players wearing haptic suits which monitor the impact on their bodies.

Now imagine, sitting in a specialist sports bar with your mates where you put on a haptic suit like the Teslasuit http://bit.ly/291tAlV which is going to sell for under $2,000 and communicates with the suit worn by your favorite player. Now you not only see through his eyes, but you feel every impact (perhaps not as forceful, we don't want you joining them for a concussion test!) with them.

5. Play games like football on your computer? Wouldn't you rather play the game like you were really playing it instead of with a joystick? With these technologies, this is just around the corner. Play MMO games, this is going to make paintball look like going to a black powder shoot!

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Rolls-Royce predicts robotic ships will be on the water by 2020

Rolls-Royce predicts robotic ships will be on the water by 2020 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
This week at the Autonomous Ship Technology Symposium 2016 in Amsterdam, the Rolls-Royce-led Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications initiative (AAWA) presented a white paper outlining what autonomous cargo vessels might be like and what...
Luigi Cappel's insight:
There's a good point in this story. If you look at today's ships and compare them to the Nina, the Pinta or the Santa Maria, they are chalk and cheese. There have been large luxury yachts that are totally operated by pushing buttons with self furling sails and auto-helms for a couple of decades already. .

Try to imagine showing Christopher Columbus today's ships and he would say something similar to what the American's said when they wanted to build railways across the USA. "You'll never get them moving."

The difference is that today change happens at an incredibly rapid pace. Think about telephony and computing. We've gone from a dumb device with 2 copper wires and a decadic pulse dialer that used little sparks to dial a number and enable voice communications to a little device that sits in your pocket and has 100 times the power of an average PC in less than 2 years.

Makes it interesting to try to predict what we will be doing in 10-20 years from now for transport and communications doesn't it? Ships like this might be around very soon.

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Netherlands cyclists most likely in EU to be hurt in traffic - NL Times

Netherlands, Top Stories - The Netherlands is the most unsafe place in Europe for cyclists. Over the past years a quarter of people killed in traffic accidents in the country were cyclists. The worldwide average is 8 percent, according to accident figures the European Commission published. - Bicycles, cycling policy, cyclists, European Commission, fatal traffic accidents, Fietsberaad, most unsafe cycling country, Otto van Boggelen, traffic accidents
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Of course more people ride on bicycles in the Netherlands than in most countries, nevertheless I read lots of stories saying how safe they are and even of trials that have been very successful of experiments removing traffic controls in towns and having next to no crashes.

The problem with sites where they try new ideas is that everyone is focused on the concept and making it work. It is not a true everyday environment.

So next time you hear about the perfect safety of cycling in the Netherlands, you should also note that 300% more cyclists die in traffic accidents there than in other parts of Europe. #Imjustsaying
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Artificial Intelligence 'outsmarts cancer' - BBC News

Artificial Intelligence 'outsmarts cancer' - BBC News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Early trial data shows a drug developed using artificial intelligence can slow the growth of cancer in clinical trials.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
A different one from me today although I do see AI as playing a large role on transport, solving problems about moving goods and people, because we are talking about managing and using Big Data. It's all very well for a scientist to decide on a plant that is known to have certain properties and spend their life's work studying that one plant as a potential cure for some condition, especially where .people have known about their healing properties for centuries.

If you had an AI, perhaps a huge farm of servers, and fed it information about all flora and fauna and all fact and traditional remedies and data about plants; told it to 'think' about the opportunities in certain ways, how much more could you come up with?

As some of you know, I have cancer as do some of my closest friends and family. It's very exciting to read about this research, but it all takes so long!

Why does it take so long? Some of it is health and safety, obviously you don't want to test and develop medicines that kill us with side effects such that we end up with "mission achieved, we killed the cancer, but unfortunately the patient died in the process.

We have talked about big data and AI for a long time. Some smart companies, corporates and government departments are using it, but most are still working on much smaller problems.

And that's kind of the point isn't it? Lets use our brains for what we are good at and use artificial intelligence and computers to do what they are good at.

I'm still scared of HAL9000 though.
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Child forced to wear GPS tracker in landmark ruling

Child forced to wear GPS tracker in landmark ruling | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

The 15-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was handed a Criminal Behaviour Order meaning he has to wear the GPS tag for six months
Luigi Cappel's insight:
You see them frequently on TV news stories, young kids committing crimes either on their own, or because young adults get them to, because as juveniles they can't be punished as adults. How often do you hear stories of despicable parents or older kids pushing children through windows with instructions of what to steal, by adults who don't want to risk going to jail?

They thumb their noses at the law and in many cases end up in jail as young adults because of the life they have chosen or the environment they are raised in. When I say that, I'm not saying they have bad parents, it might be the neighborhood they live in, the school they go to or the people they hang out with.

For some children, together with the threat that they could be taken from their homes if they flout the restrictions that come with the GPS anklet, this may help force them into a life of not committing crimes for long enough to get their acts together.

That can save them and the community a lot of grief and a lot of cost in the long run.
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New mobile site enables visitors to better navigate Croft State Park - Upstate Business Journal

New mobile site enables visitors to better navigate Croft State Park - Upstate Business Journal | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
One of Spartanburg County’s most prominent natural resources has gone digital.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
When I drove part of the Natchez Trace through Mississippi from Nashville to Louisiana, there were lots of really interesting spots with signage giving minimal information. There were the Phar Mounds, for example where Indians buried their dead thousands of years ago. Battle sites, ferries with great history, tobacco fields, a spring in a cave with poisonous water and Indian legends that go with them.

Some pamphlets and maps were available from information sites. When you are traveling a long distance, its nice to read more than two paragraphs on a sign and different things interest different people.

Why should you have to go to a museum to see a video of people working on a tobacco farm or photos of Colbert's Ferry which has a rich history, when you could have a wealth of information including track guidance on your smartphone?

It's great to see things are improving with more information being made digitally. Paper has its place as does a compass, but for a rich experience we have a powerful computer in our mobiles with us at all times these days that can give us an enriched experience and hopefully before too long the augmented reality we have been promised. Imagine pointing your phone at the kiln on the Old Trace Drive and seeing a video of people tying the tobacco leaves and loading the sticks onto the kiln racks.

Maps and GPS on the phones also mean people will know where they are and identify land marks, make sure they don't lose the trail and would also do well to have a where's my car feature, although Google seems to be providing that now.
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London Cabbies Who Pass the Test Have Bigger Brains

London Cabbies Who Pass the Test Have Bigger Brains | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The team, led by Stanford University in California, believe the research bridges the gap between animal and human studies focused on how our brains get us around.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
They say if you want to know anything, ask a cabbie. Back n the day taxis in most countries are regulated and part of that is knowing exactly where you are are going and the best route for the time of day.

In many cases that is no longer the case and taxi drivers are often strangers to the area they work in. That's where GPS comes in.

Our brain also has it's own GPS system of sorts in the hippocampus that is able to visualize where you are and works out how to get to your destination. It is a quick learner in most people, for example it can guide you to the bathroom in the dark at night.

This may be part of the wetware that helps athletes and peak performance achievers get to the goals, because they have already worked out the 'route' to their achievement, after that it is just a matter of repeating the exercise in the real world.

The number of synapses, or brain connections grows and wanes with use. Apparently only half of people who want to become London cabbies pass the street knowledge test pass and are allowed to take on the job. They off course are also the font of knowledge and wisdom about what is going on in the city, in the country, in the economy and of course the best places to eat, play and meet celebs.

So if you want solutions to your problems, maybe the answer is to take them to a London Cabbie.  As to the rest of the world, maybe a lot of them should install and use the GPS, including placing it where the passenger can see it. I've had to direct them using GPS maps on my mobile on a number of occasions recently. Although I'm not sure they didn't know that roadworks were going to add 10 minutes to my trip a week or so ago in Welllington.
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grough — Is using your GPS gadget on the mountains a threat to your life?

grough — Is using your GPS gadget on the mountains a threat to your life? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Could your incredibly accurate little GPS receiver be a threat to your life? That’s a question posed by a mountain expert who said the increasing use of satellite navigation equipment on the hills is causing new problems
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I'm hearing more commentary lately that GPS is not a great idea when used for hiking and mountaineering. Maybe there is some truth in that, but I can also tell you from experience that being lost in a mountain forest (before I had a GPS device) was a pretty scary experience, especially when the broom and gorse bush was way above my head and I had lost the track.

I agree there is a risk in people going trekking without experience and appropriate equipment. Essential items should include a paper map safely contained in something waterproof and a compass. A guide or someone who has experience is important if you are going for days and haven't done it before.

Today a mobile phone is a major boon and many people have either found their way out or be able to tell searchers where they are by using location services on their phone.

I agree that some people might not remember where they went if they rely on GPS and GPS alone is not the ideal solution, if for no other reason, that it runs on batteries that may run out.

Many trails and hiking tracks are available for download on your mobile device as well as on paper. It is also a fact that many people who get lost overnight after wandering off or getting left behind are found very close to a track, but they couldn't find it. If they had a Smartphone with even Google Maps, they might be able to. They also tend to be tourists who have no experience, whereas a large percentage of Kiwis have been taught basic bush skills.

I was on a cliff walk on the weekend and it seemed like it was lasting forever. We were told it was a 45 minute walk, which ended up at a rocky beach which we planned to use as our return route. After about an hour and a half we still hadn't found the track to the beach. I used my Samsung Galaxy with Satellite View to identify where we were. It clearly showed the track and it had a lot further to go.

We then met a local who told us that 10 minutes farther there were about 300 steep steps going down to the beach if we didn't want to complete the track. We decided to turn around and return from whence we came, but the point is that the track itself was clearly visible on the phone.

I have a portable charger that gives me 6 charges of my mobile phone. Not perfect for a long trip, but the other benefit was that I got to take a hundred or so geocoded photos. That means if anyone wanted to find the spot where I took a photo, they could use Google Maps or similar to find that exact spot, a bit like Geo-caching. Stopping to take photos also meant I was becoming more familiar with the idiosyncrasies of my surroundings.

As to the argument in this story about not being able to find your way back. If you are not experienced, don't leave the track, simple. If you are hunting or sufficiently experienced to enter the bush, a GPS device makes finding your way back a life save. Using way-points, a topographic map and a little common sense are great aids.

There was a comment about people not remembering the way they went. As someone who has done a lot of hiking over the years. Going back the other way, even on the same trail, can look very different. A GPS device can very quickly help a novice find their surroundings.

If I drive using navigation, I have no need to remember the way back, I have a need to pay attention to the road, traffic, or unexpected events. I no longer have to look for somewhere on a wet or dark day where I can find a street sign and then look for it on a map.

Research says that people who drive are much less likely to have car accidents and if they do, the damage is significantly less than from those who didn't use navigation aids. I also am pretty confident that a couple of decades of using GPS enabled devices has not reduced by intelligence or reasoning ability.

Whoops I got carried away and have to go to work. Where's my horse?
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Tomorrow’s driverless convoy on the road today

Tomorrow’s driverless convoy on the road today | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Unmanned tactical wheeled vehicles for logistics and route clearance missions provide a significant force protection advantage.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was talking with someone the other day about military drones and how they are operated from boxes like shipping containers and often the operators aren't even in the same country.

It's a logical step for the military to look at using unmanned vehicles in the theater. Let's face it, the technology they have today will save lives. Whether it's bomb or risk detection or the ability to move in ways that would be extremely unpleasant to passengers, they can do work that presents high risk to humans.

I read some years ago that the Air Force were very keen to look for new fighter pilots from young people who were highly skilled gamers.

Take a look at the new controllers for these vehicles in the article and you will see they look just like a modern version of your favorite game machine.

DARPA, NASA and similar organizations have the need and the resources to lead development of  tomorrow's technology (although  much is now done in partnership with private enterprise as in this example).

The developments of these highly sophisticated systems will in the future find their way into your new cars and trucks, with much of the R&D funded by the military and space programs.

They say they military are there to keep us safe. If vehicles can survive harsh hostile terrain and attack, maybe one day they will be able to save us from people racing around blind corners on the wrong side of the road.

Here's an idea. How about camper-vans and rental cars for people on holiday in countries where they drive on the opposite side of the road, who do not have local driving experience, where they are required to drive rental vehicles that are autonomous? What a great way to see another country, you can spend all your time enjoying the scenery instead of worrying about directions, speed zones, changing lanes and staying on the correct side of the road.
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(Mis)guided to Barbecue Party by GPS

(Mis)guided to Barbecue Party by GPS | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The trip of a young, American couple to Þórsmörk, the popular hiking area north of Eyjafjallajökull glacier, ended in an entirely different kind of Þórsmörk in Borgarfjörður, West Iceland, thanks to their GPS.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I wonder if in this case they got a more interesting experience than they would have if they had correctly entered their destination.

They got to meet real locals, eat with them and learn about the history of a place name that very few people in the world knew about and we have also got to learn the amusing history.

There are a lot of place names around the world that are the same or different by one letter or perhaps transposing a could of letters, an important lesson many of us will have experienced at some time.

In New Zealand for example many people don't know the difference for example between Kerikeri and Karikari, or entering  Manganui instead of Mangonui will totally change your experience. Like many countries we have dozens of roads with the same name. Try going to AA Maps at http://maps.aa.co.nz/search/nz/all/view+rd and see what happens to the search for View Rd. There are 150 pages of results.

As they say GIGO or Garbage In Garbage Out. So often the GPS gets blamed for doing what its told. Sometimes with interesting experiences, sometimes not. But it is not an artificial intelligence, simply a navigation database with tools.
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