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5 awesome ways brands are using location-based marketing - iMediaConnection.com

5 awesome ways brands are using location-based marketing - iMediaConnection.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
5 awesome ways brands are using location-based marketing - http://t.co/ARN9XdEp, I like the check into airports for free freq flyer pts...
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It . affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Mobile apps offer last-minute deals - Muncie Star Press

Mobile apps offer last-minute deals - Muncie Star Press | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Mobile apps offer last-minute deals
Muncie Star Press
NEW YORK — While new technology and mobile applications have made old-fashion road trips easier, the thrill of spontaneity and surprise still remains.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I haven't heard of Breather before. There's always something new! I'd like to think my network is big enough to find me a spot in a lot of cities around the world (would you offer me a hot desk for a couple of hours?) but if its location based and I need somewhere just for an hour, (I've used libraries for this in the past) handy to the location between meetings, this would be great!

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Foursquare refreshes Swarm with better check-ins, easier sharing ...

Foursquare refreshes Swarm with better check-ins, easier sharing ... | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Foursquare, the popular location-based social networking service, back in May took all the gamified features out of its main iOS client - the mayorships,
Luigi Cappel's insight:

So what do you think of the new Facebook? Are you a bit confused? Is it doing the things you signed up to Facebook for? Is it better or worse? Do they have the gamification right, or was it better before.

 

It seems to be morphing a lot more into a social app where you can find out where your friends are, but I'm not sure where they are going with things like location based marketing and how the new gamification will work.

 

Obviously they need to keep reinventing themselves to find new audiences and revenue. Ar they on the right track? I'm really interested in your thoughts.

 

I do like the idea of who's nearby and if I worked in the city I would probably use it more to catch up with friends and associates, but I'm not checking in anywhere as often as I used to.

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Think your commute is bad? Be glad you don’t live in Bangladesh.

Think your commute is bad? Be glad you don’t live in Bangladesh. | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Life in one of the world's most congested cities. (Think your commute is bad? Be glad you don’t live in Bangladesh. http://t.co/Wil77WSbec)
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It's all relative isn't it? When we look at our traffic problems, we think of them as having a major impact on our GDP. If people can't get to work in their choice of transport mode and time, it costs us money. We think of this as a first world problem.

 

In reality traffic congestion and the amount of time it takes people to get to work, or to do their work where it involves travel, impacts travelers no  matter where they are.

 

I wonder if any of the experts look towards these countries for ideas, as well as the wealthy countries with a highly developed technical infrastructure. When I watch videos from TED conferences and see a business developed by putting a washing machine mechanism onto the back of a small motorcycle and the owner traveling through a poor village with no electricity and doing their washing for them, I am impressed with their problem solving skills.

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San Francisco firm Uber to bring private car-hailing app technology to Taiwan - WantChinaTimes

San Francisco firm Uber to bring private car-hailing app technology to Taiwan - WantChinaTimes | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Whilst WantChinaTimes San Francisco firm Uber to bring private car-hailing app technology to Taiwan WantChinaTimes The apps, when downloaded to the user's smartphone, detect the Global Positioning System's (GPS) space-based satellite navigation system and...

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Whilst legislation may need to catch up, the reality is that this is a new wave of transportation.

 

I hear and understand a lot of complaints from the existing industries, but there are many arguments in favor of this evolution. It could mean fewer cars on the road. That has to be good from a green perspective.

 

One way the existing taxi industry could compete is by allowing passengers to rate existing taxi drivers, because there are drivers who take their customers 'the long way round' and this is one of the reasons that the whole industry gets a bad name.

 

A classic example I hear frequently is asking the passenger which route to take. This is a way of letting the driver off if they take the longer or more congested route. They should all be using solutions such as Waze or TomTom with real time traffic. If they are professional, then most of the time they know the fastest route at any time of day

 

Taxi companies should read 'What Would Google Do' by Jeff Jarvis. If they uniformly provided a great service, people would not be wanting other services. These new services could not get off the ground or survive if the existing ones were providing a great solution.

 

Just like book stores, record stores and other industries, the taxi industry needs to keep reinventing itself or others will take over. That is the nature of change.

 

With my tongue firmly planted in my cheek, I believe there is a global conspiracy. There is a central location on the planet where they send taxi drivers to countries where they don't speak the local language and don't know the local road network.

 

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Comment: See how borders change on Google Maps depending on where you are - SBS (blog)

Comment: See how borders change on Google Maps depending on where you are - SBS (blog) | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
SBS (blog)
Comment: See how borders change on Google Maps depending on where you are
SBS (blog)
It's hard to draw a map without making someone angry. There are 32 countries that Google Maps won't draw borders around.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is really interesting. I wonder what they do with Iraq. Some countries change all the time and I remember back in school that the names of the countries and their borders were changing and the school Atlases couldn't keep up.

 

This of course is a bit different. These aren't necessarily changing boarders but an accommodation of what it takes to have your (Google's) product politically acceptable in some countries. In some countries right now they'd have to change the borders every day. Not that this is anything new, the borders in most of the world have been changing ever since someone decided to put a fence around their city a few thousand years ago.

 

Got to give it to Google though, they know what they are doing. Maybe it's time I read Jeff Jarvis' great book What Would Google Do? again....

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Boston Police: GPS Puts Suspect At Scene Of Arboretum Sex Assault - CBS Local

Boston Police: GPS Puts Suspect At Scene Of Arboretum Sex Assault - CBS Local | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
WCVB Boston
Boston Police: GPS Puts Suspect At Scene Of Arboretum Sex Assault
CBS Local
The suspect, 23-year-old Ashton Davis was wearing a GPS bracelet in connection with another rape case in Roxbury court.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I hear a lot of stories saying GPS bracelets don't work. I suspect the issue in many cases is that the bracelets work, but the resources aren't applied to ensure that the people wearing are not monitored. Clearly this person's bracelets worked, but either the rules or the people entrusted to enforce the rules weren't monitoring them.

 

The story doesn't say if this many was on home detention or exactly what his conditions were, but alarm bells should have gone off either when he left his place of residence, or when he found himself in a public place where he could pose a risk to other members of society.

 

The technology obviously worked. The system, the procedures, or lack of them, or the resources required to enforce them weren't available. Either way, this may have been preventable. If it wasn't, then he should have remained in preventative custody.

 

GPS is a piece of technology. It's the application that makes it work.

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San Francisco ousts parking apps for poaching public parking - Inside Mobile Apps

San Francisco ousts parking apps for poaching public parking - Inside Mobile Apps | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
TechCrunch
San Francisco ousts parking apps for poaching public parking
Inside Mobile Apps
Worst of all, it encourages drivers to use their mobile devices unsafely — to engage in online bidding wars while driving.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I can understand the legal side if this problem, It's very much like selling something you don't own and I doubt you have a legal right to do this.

 

However, it highlights that San Fran has a major problem, especially when the article talks about ParkMondo paying people $15 just to sit in a car park and hold it for someone who will pay extra to be able to use it.

 

To me the smart thing would be to understand that not only does SF have a parking space problem, what they really have is a problem with people being able to get to their destination. Whilst they can look at other interventions like more public transport and more car parks, or combinations of the two, in my opinion, they should either be talking to the developers of these apps an see if they can work out something that's mutually beneficial.

 

That's what Kiwi company Frogparking does. https://frogparking.com/. They not only provide the software for people to locate parks and book them, but they also provide enforcement apps for infringement management and warnings to the public when the carpark time is about to expire. The concept is around letting everyone get the park they need and stock-turn so that lots of people can get parks. Very valuable in shopping or entertainment precincts.

 

Instead of stomping on these people, use their smarts and collaborate. Take a lead from Auckland City Council in New Zealand which recently ran a weekend long Civic Hacking event on Transport. http://hackakl.org.nz/

 

They knew that they would be thrown some curly ideas, but they were also accessing a community of people capable of helping. You often need people who are not emotionally or otherwise invested in the problem. There aren't many cities with more developers and entrepreneurs than San Francisco. Get with the program city managers!

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GetRaasta's curator insight, June 25, 11:45 PM

Developing Location Based Apps that are helpful for customers is a good thing , but Safety should always be first.

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10 Must-Have Free Travel Apps to Download Before Your Next Trip

10 Must-Have Free Travel Apps to Download Before Your Next Trip | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Ten of the best free travel apps for both iOS and Android. Be sure to download them before heading off on your next trip. (So, why haven't you downloaded these super-useful, FREE travel apps yet?
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Just in case you thought you knew them all, I'll wager there are at least a couple here that you haven't looked at before. For example of you have Sit or Squat on your smartphone? Didn't think so. They might come in very handy. Planning a road trip anytime soon? Have a quick look at these before you go.

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Packers adopting GPS technology to research injuries - NBCSports.com

Packers adopting GPS technology to research injuries - NBCSports.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Packers adopting GPS technology to research injuries NBCSports.com In a detailed look at their training plans, Pete Dougherty of the Green Bay Press-Gazette explains how the Packers are using a GPS monitoring system on certain players in practice...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Interesting that most off the comments on this page are derogatory, whether it is that they are not Packers fans, or they just don't get it.

 

The All Blacks have used location based and mobile technologies for years and injuries are a classic. What were they doing when they were injured, where were they on the field, was it  scrum, a tackle, what were they doing. When the best teams in the world try these things, you can bet there is a reason behind it. I don't follow the Packers, but New Zealand are the world champs in rugby and are currently on a winning streak of 17 international matches, equaling the world record. Btw, they aren't too up themselves to try yoga or other ideas either lol.

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Electric cars need to be supported by intelligent transport systems | CGI.com

Electric cars need to be supported by intelligent transport systems | CGI.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
It is not surprising that there is a world of expectation from electric cars. Electro-mobility is far more than replacing internal combustion engines with electric motors and tanks with batteries.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Isn't this exactly what is happening?

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Mobile Marketing Stumbles as Pandora Plays San Francisco Ads in New York - Bloomberg

Mobile Marketing Stumbles as Pandora Plays San Francisco Ads in New York - Bloomberg | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Mobile Marketing Stumbles as Pandora Plays San Francisco Ads in New York
Bloomberg
Marketers spend as much as $2.4 billion a year on mobile ads aimed at users based on geography, and Pandora is far from the only app whose ads sometimes go awry.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This isn't a stumble it's a fantastic marketing opportunity for Pandora to recognize a minor glitch and turn it into a major marketing win.

 

Advertisers wants to reach local people who have access to their goods and services. Consumers want goods and services and if they can take advantage of deals and offers close to them, that are well targeted, which includes a match to their rough location and their interests, they are open to buy.

 

Pandora not only has the ability to quickly provide a fix asking for permission to have the location of their premium customers, if they haven't already done that. I use Spotify and they certainly know I live in Auckland, New Zealand, although I pay for an advertisement free service.

 

The location, time of day and musical tastes of listeners is a gold mine for Business Analysts who understand how to mine these things and identify generic interests, gender, age group and other information about freemium listeners, not only by what they are listening to and where they are (and whether and when that location changes) but also when they don't, for example, in New Zealand if I never listen to Spotify when there is an international rugby match on, they will be able to work out why and that's another tick on my profile.

 

Don't get lost in the headline of this story, it has some excellent examples of small businesses that can equally profit from location based marketing. You don't have to be a giant to run location based campaigns. There are still plenty of great services such as Foursquare that have complete packaged solutions for SME business for free and then of course the amazing world of Facebook and Google.

 

This isn't a stumble for mobile marketing, it's inertia building before the next leap.

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Free Apps Help You Save Money On Last-Minute Hotels

Free Apps Help You Save Money On Last-Minute Hotels | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
If you're far from an advance planner, there are new apps that could save you up to 35% on hotel bookings that same night. (Want to save on #hotel reservations?
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I love travel apps and have used them extensively. TripAdvisor and Travelocity are a couple of favorites. I have many others on my iPad.

 

What I particularly like about TripAdvisor is the reviews. I look for reviews where the manager replies to praise and brickbats and show they care for their customers. Yes there are fake reviews and there are people who can never be satisfied, but learn to read between the you lines and you will almost always get what you expect.

 

If you want to know more about apps, check out my blogs at http://luigicappel@wordpress.com and http://solomoconsulting.wordpress.com.

 

Here's some advice that will save you money and get you the best deals available. Find the hotel you want, find the best deal through the app. Then ring the front desk (not the national reservation office) around 8PM. Most of the guests have been checked in, staff have eaten, are not ready for their night audit and are often bored. Find out the name of the person who answers the phone and have a chat.

 

Tell them you are on a tight budget and that you found a deal on an app or web page. Ask them what they can do. I almost always get a better price or an upgrade, free breakfast etc. You can also ask about which side of the hotel is noisy, or has WiFi (often back of house rooms don't have good coverage.

 

When you arrive, ask for the person who helped you and thank them. If they are not there, ask for the manager and ask for your thanks to be passed on.

 

I used to have a favorite hotel in Christchurch. Unfortunately it collapsed in the earthquakes a few years ago. I used this strategy to start with. I made a point of recognizing a particular staff member who always remembered me by name and gave me great service. I told the Hotel Manager how good she was. Next time I stayed at that hotel, she came to me in the restaurant and thanks me profusely. She got recognition in front of her peers at a staff meeting as well as an evening in the restaurant for her family as a guest of the hotel. She said no one had ever treated her like that before.

 

From then on, the already great service stepped up. I would always be met at my car, greeted by name, got a free upgrade and even a robe for Christmas (that's another cool story) and of course they had my ongoing loyalty.

 

So, yes absolutely use your apps. But remember that people deal with people and in the hospitality industry (speaking as someone who lived and assisted in a large urban motel and studied hotel motel management) many customers are demanding and not particularly cheerful for various reasons. Complaints outnumber praise at about 50:1. Treat people with respect and it will give you a far better experience than the 35% off from the special deal.

 

As a footnote, no one pays rack rate, unless its the last available rooms at the Pink Flamingo in Las Vegas. Prices are often inflated to deal with the hefty discounts the app providers look for.

 

Let me know if you follow my advice, I'd love to hear how you got on.

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Google Nearby paves way for location specific ads

Google Nearby paves way for location specific ads | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Google is putting the finishing touches to a location tracking app for Android smartphones which will enable handsets to keep track of...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It's getting closer to a reality on different Operating Systems, then come potential wars as solution vie for dominance. Then in 5 years or so it will be business as usual.

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Toyota Seeks Patents on Warning and Navigation Systems - IPWatchdog.com

Toyota Seeks Patents on Warning and Navigation Systems - IPWatchdog.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Toyota Seeks Patents on Warning and Navigation Systems IPWatchdog.com 20140172290, entitled Navigation of On-Road Vehicle Based on Vertical Elements, would protect an apparatus comprised of a navigational unit which determines the position of a...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is a really interesting article about patents being developed and sought by Toyota. The motor industry is full of innovation even though a lot of it takes decades to filter through to the new car sales lot.

 

Of course all car manufacturers do this. I used to love seeing the car design competitions Honda used to run for its staff, where they could create any kind of car they wanted, which ranged from the solar powered vehicles through to cars with built in spa pools.

 

A lot of car concepts come from left field, but then it takes years to persuade an organization to go ahead with a radical concept and then design, get OEM components built, order parts years in advance etc. Look at HUDS (Heads Up Displays) they were in science fiction movies and TV shows when I was little, but even today they are only in a minority of upmarket cars.

 

When I see concepts like ITS technology that can allow a car to know how far away and how fast the car in front of you is driving, I get excited. Especially when  see things like the frequent nose to tail crashes on our motorways. But then I get really frustrated when the technology is proprietary.

 

I mean, who wants to buy a Volvo that can identify the speed of the car in front, avoid a collision with it, if i slams on the breaks to avoid a hedgehog crossing the road, if it only works when the car in front is also a Volvo of at least the same vintage.

 

I appreciate innovation and profit, I am all for patents and the ability to profit from ingenuity, that is essential for the motor industry to stay in business, and I do love cars. But I'm an idealist. What if the major car manufacturers licensed at least some IP to each other. For example, develop a new safety feature which can read roadside speed signs and alert the driver via a HUD that they are going to fast and that the signs are different to the speed the navigation system is telling them. Then sell the IP to their competitors.

 

If each car manufacturer focused on one area of specialty, maybe innovation would speed up. They can still have plenty of unique features that make buyers select their model over the others, but we could enjoy safer, cheaper, more enjoyable driving sooner.

 

On the other side of the fence I love what Tesla have done, making their IP open source so that anyone can use it. That adds so much value to their brand in my book. If I could afford one, I would buy it just because I like their sense of supporting the community of tomorrow. What a great thing to do.

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Watch this: Human transforms its app data into striking activity maps

Watch this: Human transforms its app data into striking activity maps | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Now, the outfit has taken user data from 30 of the largest cities in the world and constructed visualizations for each locale. Maps for all three of the aforementioned endeavors are included, broken down by activity for further ...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I've tried a lot of LBS apps over the years and I'm always open to something new. So I've installed it, why don't you do the same and we can move and make aesthetic map art together.

 

Watch my blog at luigicappel.wordpress.com and we can compare notes. I've used a lot of apps to track fitness, walking travel etc. I've done the 10,000 steps program, Map My Walk and lots more, After a while they get boring unless they keep evolving or offer something you can't get anywhere else.

 

The installation was quick and the app is free. So lets see where this takes us. See you out there:)

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Pune Munical Corporation will now use GPS for tracking your garbage - Daily News & Analysis

Pune Munical Corporation will now use GPS for tracking your garbage - Daily News & Analysis | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Daily News & Analysis Pune Munical Corporation will now use GPS for tracking your garbage Daily News & Analysis Pune: After receiving complaints that garbage collection vehicles do not collect garbage regularly, the Pune Municipal Corporation(PMC)...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I wonder if they have also considered other benefits, for example, today's Fleet Management Systems have gyros and inertia sensors that can monitor safe driving, things such as harsh braking and cornering. The vehicles can be remotely unlocked in the event that someone accidentally locks the keys in the truck.

 

Fleet Management can be used to report where in a run the vehicle is and where it has been, so if people do complain, the Fleet Manager can view a breadcrumb trail online on which roads the vehicle has been on and when. So for example if someone got their garbage out late and then blamed the truck operator that can also be monitored.

 

Accidents happen in this industry and an emergency button would also be useful in the event of an equipment malfunction that injures an operator and if the airbags are deployed, an alarm can be sent back to base together with the geospatial coordinates.

 

It also allows monitoring of unauthorized driving, driving to unauthorized locations and many more functions such as supporting route optimization, green driving (lead feet). It can also help with things like keeping records of when services are due, licensing and driver information.

 

Good move PMC.

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More Travellers Choosing To Book With Apps

More Travellers Choosing To Book With Apps | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

This is tMore US consumers will book their hotels, airfares and other travel options via a smartphone or similar device in 2014 (26 million US consumers will book hotels, airfares and other travel options via smartphone or similar device in 2014

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is true, but it is important to understand the full flow through process of apps or they can be annoying. Apps need to be robust and follow through the process at every user interaction in real life.

 

For example, last night I arrived at Wellington airport. My Air New Zealand app told me about traffic and weather and interesting things like that, which was really good.

 

I used it to enter the Koru lounge using my boarding pass which was great. However when I came out of the boarding lounge the experience was not so good. When you go out of the lounge passengers are typically boarding. The app didn't tell me which gate to go to, so now I was in a bit of a hurry. (Normally it does, but as I mentioned it needs to be robust and this time it didn't). I had to go to a monitor to find out and the flight number was slightly different (had an extra number on it from what was on my iPhone). I ended up having to ask someone to confirm it.

 

So now I go through security because Wellington has security at each gate as opposed to Auckland where everyone goes through the same security channel prior to the gates.

 

There is a throng of people funneling through to two attendant kiosks. My place in the throng channels me to the right where I am ready to drop my iPhone wit it's QR Code on the scanner, but wait. No scanner. No I see why a number of people have been pushed from one queue to the other, embarrassingly placing themselves in front of other people at the head of the line, as if they were queue jumping (not the Kiwi way) or in some cases going right to the back of the other line and waiting all over again.

 

Of the two check in kiosks, only one of them had a a scanner and the other one was only for 'real' printed boarding passes. Then you still have to have a 'gate pass' printed. What's that about? I have a full application that provides a visible digital boarding pass, why kill more trees to give me a piece of paper when I already have all the info on my mobile.

 

In my humble opinion, the people with these apps need to not only test them theoretically, but actually travel, or have mystery fliers use them and just spend a day periodically traveling through various domestic airport routes and see how it works. Preferably incognito.

 

Apps are great, but they have to provide a quality end to end experience. They should provide the full end to end service and be of benefit at all ends of the value chain. It should be an easier customer story,

 

Oh and why can't I confirm my seat on the app? I still have to go to the Air NZ web site to request a specific seat. That's more double handling.

 

Remember how different grocery shopping was before apps and self scanning? They saved loads of money on labels, staff and process and gave the customers who chose to use the services faster throughput as well as a lot more information, like navigation through the store to find your items, specials and promotion information and recipes. The whole experience improved.

 

Air NZ is 3/4 of the way there, but it doesn't feel like they have got it right. Yesterday they almost convinced me to go back to the expensive kiosks for a REAL boarding pass.

 

Oh and don't get me started on the Auckland Airport parking. Why isn't that an app? 3 visits in the last week. Two out of three machines (one per day) either not processing some cards or types of transactions, one day where one didn't provide a receipt so I can't claim the parking on my expenses. 2 of the 3 cold wet days they did have staff trying to help people in the long queues, but the customer experience and mood was not one that the Airport Company would crow as a success story. I note that this is a separate company and not Air NZ.

 

Also a note that I really do like Air NZ and this is using them as an example only. There are many airlines around the world offering similar wanting experiences. I just feel that these experiences shouldn't be happening in this day and age. Apps are so popular because they help ease the frustrations of the travel experience when they work properly.

 

One of the songs I wrote is called The Best Part of Going Away is Coming Home. I love visiting other places and people, but the process of getting through the airports and onto the planes is much harder than it should be. Put as much effort into the full experience as you do on the wonderful safety instruction video and in flight service, with fantastic crews and you'll have more happy customers. It can't be hard.

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Google Maps Update Brings Support For Android Wear - Headlines & Global News

Google Maps Update Brings Support For Android Wear - Headlines & Global News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Headlines & Global News
Google Maps Update Brings Support For Android Wear
Headlines & Global News
The web giant updated its Google Maps app for Android this week, bringing support for its open-source platform for wearable devices, Android Wear.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This may not seem like much, but ut really is. It might even get me wearing a watch again except that I don't have an Android phone. Combining navigation on a watch, together with a heart rate monitor is going to appeal to everyone from a tourist, to people into fitness.

 

The pricing of these watches around the $200 mark makes them accessible to most people.

 

Why is this important? largely because it brings wearable computing to the masses, without them even realizing they are doing it. It makes things simple and users will gain benefits they never thought they wanted. Of course it makes the mobile even more ubiquitous. Some will say that it makes it all but impossible to disconnect from the world. They're right, but if it brings the world to you with the features you want, your world, then that's good in my book.

 

You can still have holidays and turn it all off for a break....

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Gov'ts shouldn't rely too much on traffic-control cameras - Editorial - Newsday

Gov'ts shouldn't rely too much on traffic-control cameras - Editorial - Newsday | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Nassau is counting on as much as $30 million per year in revenue from speed cameras. (Traffic Cam FACTS
1. They reduce crashes, esp serious ones.
2.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I would be hoping for this problem. I really can't imagine any cities putting red light cameras in to generate revenue. There is a significant cost associated with urban accidents. The cost to the GDP of congestion due to accidents in a city is often very high.

 

Red light runners have a significant impact on our roads. They cause accidents which endanger the safety of our citizens. The delays as a consequence of the accidents as people park up, wait for police or tow trucks is more congestion and sometimes additional problems such as road rage.

 

The impacts of stoppages at one intersection start impacting on other road segments including activating a range of personnel from emergency services, traffic management engineers, traffic operations centers, and others all comes out of the civic purse, your taxes.

 

Then of course there are all the goods and services vehicles that can't get to their clients and then can't complete their days work, people to get to work late, kids get to school late, products end up not getting to the shelves on time and often extra people need to be hired to do the work of the people who couldn't do their jobs because of the gridlock caused by the accident.

 

When you way up all the money and time saved by reducing the accidents caused by red light runners, the fact that the cameras aren't generating much revenue because people are obeying the signals is a good thing. People who get fined may think its unfair, but to me what is unfair is that their inconsideration of their fellow citizens, thinking that the laws are only for other people and that they have an exclusive right to race through red lights need to understand the ramifications of what they do. I don't believe it was ever about the money. The cost of putting these systems in and managing the outcomes is very high and I find it hard that any DOT would put them in for the sake of revenue gathering.

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These Maps Show How Many Brutally Hot Days You Will Suffer When You're Old - Mother Jones

These Maps Show How Many Brutally Hot Days You Will Suffer When You're Old - Mother Jones | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Mother Jones
These Maps Show How Many Brutally Hot Days You Will Suffer When You're Old
Mother Jones
One of the main difficulties in getting people to care about climate change is that it can be hard to notice on a daily basis.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Going outside could be unsafe for 10% of the population in 2200. Climate change has so many implications. If you don't think it will matter to you or your business, what about the planet you are leaving for your children and grandchildren.

 

These maps will give you a little more to think about.

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Driverless cars closer than you think - Sydney Morning Herald

Driverless cars closer than you think - Sydney Morning Herald | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald Driverless cars closer than you think Sydney Morning Herald The technology that will one day make it possible for driverless cars to operate on our roads is already well advanced, attendees at last week's annual Victorian...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I agree it's coming and is likely to start in certain specific uses perhaps. Imagine for example a meter reader for a company that uses technology where the person doesn't actually have to leave their car.

 

The road network does need to be upgraded to support ITS and its likely that this will start in large cities with large commuter bases. There are also risks though. What happens when teenagers try to make sport of confusing driver-less cars? http://thefuturediaries.com/2013/04/19/boy-racers-make-sport-with-driverless-cars/ ;

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10 maps that show how much time Americans spend grooming, eating, thinking ... - Washington Post (blog)

10 maps that show how much time Americans spend grooming, eating, thinking ... - Washington Post (blog) | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
10 maps that show how much time Americans spend grooming, eating, thinking ...
Washington Post (blog)
Below are 10 maps showing the sometimes surprising regional variation in American time use. A couple things to understand about the BLS data.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

A picture is worth a thousand words. What don't you know about your  country?

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DIESELtalk Alert: Intelligent transport systems coming this way; 50MAX maps, permits, now online

DIESELtalk Alert: Intelligent transport systems coming this way; 50MAX maps, permits, now online | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
DIESELtalk Alert: Intelligent transport systems coming this way; 50MAX maps, permits, now online - http://t.co/qMQlwLkw4u
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Interested in big trucks, intelligent transport and how NZ companies are leading the way? Check this out.

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Feds Looking To Regulate Navigation Apps Like Google Maps - Auto World News

Feds Looking To Regulate Navigation Apps Like Google Maps - Auto World News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Auto World News Feds Looking To Regulate Navigation Apps Like Google Maps Auto World News TechCrunch listed Google Maps, Waze, Apple Maps and Nokia Maps as navigation apps that would come under the new guidelines, which officials say would only...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I hope that the research they are doing isn't as shallow as it sounds. There are plenty of arguments for and against Portable Navigation Devices (PND's) and integrated OEM solutions.

 

For example to say that a mobile phone running the same car navigation system as a PND is more dangerous because you are looking at the phone at your windscreen shows a lack of research. If you are looking at a device running on your windscreen on a mount, whether it is your phone or a PND strategically placed, it causes minimal disruption to your view through the windscreen and you can compare the information with the road easily.

 

OEM systems are typically mounted in the area traditionally used for DIN slots where your car entertainment and climate control systems are typically housed. Look down there every time you want to confirm an instruction or detail and you are looking totally away from the road. Which do you think is more dangerous? How often do we hear about distracted driving from people looking away from the road. Whether its the navigation, changing station on the radio or wanting to see what a friend is listening to on Pandora, anything that gets a driver to look down towards their gearshift rather than out through the window has a conceptual flaw that can impact on safety.

 

I shudder back to the days when I used to see tourists driving with a paper road map on their camper-van steering wheel, peering through their windscreen and side windows trying to locate and then read a road sign and having to then orient themselves back on the map, while driving, because there is a law that says that wherever you stop, there isn't a sign in sight.

 

Ford Sync is a good example of going in the right direction, but in my opinion, anything other than a well placed heads up display, is more distracting than using the DIN slot area on the dashboard, which is not only below the windscreen, but also to the side of the natural viewpoint. Why are the instruments directly above the steering wheel?

 

I am totally in favor of serious research and education in the area of distracted driving, but lets focus on facts and less on emotive issues. Let's start with research into what causes the least distraction.

 

I like the research that TomTom has done with insurance companies that found that people using car navigation have fewer motor accidents than those without it (at a time when most nav is either from a smartphone or a PND. It also found that people that where did have accidents and were using nav, that the impact or damage / consequences of the accidents was less than for those who didn't use nav.

 

When insurance companies do this research and share these types of findings, it is all about risk. They don't want their clients having accidents, it impacts on their profit. I trust that research, because of their motives. Fewer accidents means greater bottom line profit. Surely the Feds would look at it the same way. If they want fewer accidents, they need to be asking the right questions.

 

Now if you're talking about sending txt messages, using social media and even talking on a hands free phone kit while driving, that is distraction in my book. It has nothing with being in safe control of a powerful machine, sharing roads with other people, most of whom are not expert drivers. Being alert and listening (because most of the time you are not watching) to car navigation instructions is totally different to having business discussions, analyzing relationships, or the latest sporting event with someone who is not in the vehicle with you, are very different.

 

What do you think?

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'App-y' Father's Day with These Fitness Trackers - BostInno

'App-y' Father's Day with These Fitness Trackers - BostInno | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
'App-y' Father's Day with These Fitness Trackers
BostInno
Many of these mobile apps wirelessly sync with those devices. Your father will be able to have all of this data at the touch of a button making it simple to achieve those fitness goals.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I'm one of those people who likes gadgets, you might say I'm  toy boy. If the gadget helps motivate me to manage a fitness regime, all the better. I'm a walker so I use Map My Walk.

 

This comprehensive easy to read feature looks at exercise, diet, connected gadgets and even sleep monitoring. Almost everything you  might want to choose from.

 

There is still one gap, which regular readers will have read from me before. I want an app that can help me create routes, preferably on the fly, of everywhere I haven't been. I want a walking/running app that lets me explore the country and the city. I know that's a lot of data, but it can't be that hard. Map My Run told me they would consider it, but that was a couple of years ago now and I'm still waiting.

 

I used to ocean kayak and every weekend I would kayak a section of the Auckland coastline and inner harbor waterways. Each trip I would mark on a map where I had finished for the day and next trip I would start at that location until I had completed the entire East Coast. It was highly motivating. I want the same on my iPhone for walking. If you agree and also have Map My Run, how about asking them as well so that its not just me?

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