Location Is Everywhere
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Kapture Thinks Check-Ins Should Be As Easy As Snapping Photos - San Francisco Chronicle

Kapture Thinks Check-Ins Should Be As Easy As Snapping Photos - San Francisco Chronicle | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Kapture Thinks Check-Ins Should Be As Easy As Snapping PhotosSan Francisco ChronicleMichael Szewczyk was a founding member of Qwiki, a Wikipedia-like video platform. In July he moved back to New York to start a company of his own, Kapture.
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon

Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
I've been reading a book called 'Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do' by Tom Vanderbilt, which resonates very well with me. Now I'm no petrol head, but I still like driving my car and it is still m...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It only takes a little pain to have people hop in their cars. A wet day, having to stand on a bus, or having to stand on the side of the road and watch the bus go by. Driving is part of our culture. We are how we move. Even in cities where driving is impractical, like Tokyo, I have friends who still own a car, almost a status symbol because of the costs of even parking your car. They go driving in the weekend and enjoy the countryside.

The most popular and profitable radio time, even today when so many people are connected to their smartphones for entertainment, is drive-time. Of course this is also when we get our critical traffic reports.

We don't even want to get out of our cars. An estimated 22% of ALL restaurant meals in America are ordered through the window of a car.

I really like the footer, that a pedestrian is someone who has just parked their car.

Just last night I was reading in the news that sales of new passenger cars in New Zealand have gone up in the first months of this year by 3.6% breaking a 26 year record. Sales of commercial vehicles for the first four months in this country are up 14% on the same period last year.

Still think more people are ditching their cars?

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The Wireless Charging of Moving Electric Vehicles Just Overcame A Major Hurdle

The Wireless Charging of Moving Electric Vehicles Just Overcame A Major Hurdle | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Stanford scientists have wirelessly transferred electricity to a moving lightbulb — a first step in addressing the limited driving range of electric cars.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is potentially huge, no pun intended (geek joke). This would work really well for buses in proprietary lanes. What I don't understand is whether there is attenuation, i.e. does power transmitted by induction dissipate if it is not used, on the basis that the power supply as explained in the article is not moving with the vehicle. 

I had read somewhere that one of the German car manufacturers was testing a similar concept on a private track where the power was being supplied by induction to the side of the car. Sounds a little scary, but it makes sense as a solution to increase range, especially in urban areas. 

Keep in mind we are talking to supplementing the charge that is already in the vehicle, not providing motive power. 
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Vendor-neutral smart car bug has 'dangerous' and 'even fatal' consequences

Vendor-neutral smart car bug has 'dangerous' and 'even fatal' consequences | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
"You could disable the air bags, the anti-lock brakes, or the door locks, and steal the car," says researcher.
David Bisson reports.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is interesting because I believe that a solution for connected cars has to come from the aftermarket segment in order to be able to reach a critical mass.

However as this article points out, the systems they would communicate through were not designed to communicate outside of the individual vehicle and therefore the CAN bus automatically trusts whatever instructions it is given.

I've seen interest in roadside rescue being able to remotely unlock cars, or warn the driver when theare running low on petrol to reduce the number of callouts, but this is potentially on the risky side. 

Of course this doesn't stop a new industry segment from being developed. It's no different to WiFi door locks and security in homes. They just need to ensure that systems sold do have robust security encryption.

I suspect that Blockchain technologies will become part of the solution.
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Officials fighting wrong-way crashes with research into real-time alerts

Officials fighting wrong-way crashes  with research into real-time alerts | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Kevin Balke turned his SUV southeastward, checked his instruments and confirmed he was ready. Nearly a mile of concrete stood before him with plenty of room to run, but he wouldn't need all of it to prove his point - he'd be going the wrong way in no time. Accelerating past a pole jutting from an electrical box - just like the ones that line every Texas highway - it took only a few seconds for the tablet mounted to the dash of Balke's Ford Explorer to explode with the flashing warning: Wrong Way, styled just like the signs common on roads, with a red background and bold letters. "It got us," Balke said, confirming the tablet gave him the warning he wanted to see.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This story highlights two issues. One is that connected cars can save lives and help reduce the number of crashes, in this case around 237 crashes a year in Texas alone, that are caused by people driving the wrong way on the road. This is a global problem, but the number just in Texas every year is staggering.

The second is the ageing car market. The initiatives and offshoot technology from the development of driverless cars is creating benefits for the purchasers of new cars, but there is a real need to get technology into all cars to create an environment of interconnected cars, that in this instance can warn both the driver of a car making a serious mistake as well as the vehicles he is driving towards.

The story illustrates how aftermarket solutions, typically taking advantage of people using mobile phones with location services, can make it possible for everyone to be alerted until the day when connected cars become a reality. It also overcomes the issue of proprietary cars, where for example Volvo cars will talk to cars that use their system, but not to GM or Ford. 
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Plans for digital advertising screens on new phone kiosks are knocked back

Plans for digital advertising screens on new phone kiosks are knocked back | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Clear Channel submitted applications to Stirling Council for fascia signs at new kiosks on Baker Street, King Street and Dumbarton Road East.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
In a town in Scotland they are doing what most places have done removed or rethinking phone booth's. and turned them into WiFi zones.

What's interesting is that Stirling council turned down requests to use the sides of these booths as digital advertising platforms, which is probably how the WiFi service and maintenance was going to be funded.

As someone who has spent a lot on digital advertising over the years, you  pay in proportion to the number of eyeballs driving past, so it's pretty hard to argue that it is not a distraction to drivers. If it isn't distracting them, the advertiser is not getting value for money.

Most digital advertising is static because the message of a short video is likely to be missed by passing motorists, or cause more problems if they are at busy controlled intersections. It's bad enough when  people missed the green light because they were focused on their mobile in their car.

When advertising companies design new digital signs, their job is to come up with something that attracts the eye long enough to get them thinking about the content. That means our eyes and some of our cognition are now occupied and we are less able to respond to what is going on, on the road. 

The consequence is frequently sufficient to result in a nose to tail or car vs pedestrian accident. As an advertiser all I wanted was eyeballs, but I'd hate to think anything I wanted to tell people endangered them.
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GPS tracker leads to arrest of Coralville robbery suspect | The Gazette

GPS tracker leads to arrest of Coralville robbery suspect | The Gazette | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Gazette | CORALVILLE - A Global Positioning System tracker helped police capture a man accused of robbing a cellphone store on Wednesday.According to a Coralville police
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Not only are GPS trackers becoming cheaper and smaller, but they are likely to result in arrests and the return of stolen property. 

If you are in retail or any industry at risk of getting burgled, isn't including a GPS tracker with whatever you give a robber or inside something they come to steal a much better option than putting yourself at risk defending your business in person, especially when these people are often either under influence of drugs and unpredictable or desperate.

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Google Highlights Maps Features For Avoiding Traffic | Androidheadlines.com

Google Highlights Maps Features For Avoiding Traffic | Androidheadlines.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Google has highlighted some of the key features of its Google Maps service that could help both parents and students wade through busy streets. The search
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Unfortunately this feature has not reached New Zealand so we still have to use other services, but I note that one of the most popular pages from the NZ Transport Agency web page in Auckland is a graph of motorway traffic congestion http://www.journeys.nzta.govt.nz/traffic-and-travel-information/auckland-travel-times which is particularly useful to those hopping on and off at various parts of the motorway. It's not pretty, but I haven't seen a better way to deliver the data s shows on one page.

Showing a message saying that 'Parking is usually limited near this destination' may make some people reconsider their transport mode choice, perhaps using public transport or ride-sharing instead of driving all of the way.

I also like the feature where it shows you that there are delays on your way, but it doesn't tell you if they are delays based on normal speeds for that day of the week or time of day, or delays against when there is little or no traffic e.g. 2AM.

My local experience, which is probably different to the US is that Google doesn't recognise changes in New Zealand traffic density due to public or school holidays and takes a week or two to catch up on what normal is. I'm now using HERE maps myself and find them to be really good, also free and very up to date when it comes to things like speed zones and local road closures, which Google also has not mastered here yet.
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Young Iranians Are Using These Apps to Bypass Government Oppression

Young Iranians Are Using These Apps to Bypass Government Oppression | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Amid censorship and "moral police", the youth of Iran are looking to their smartphones for civil liberties.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
One of the things I really like about mobile apps is they create a more transparent society. In the west we have many freedoms, such as freedom of speech. There are some people who might take it too far, but in general it makes politics and people more transparent and provides means for communication without censorship. 

With so many people now being able to develop apps quickly and at low cost it would be all but impossible for Governments that allow cellphone use (which is most) to stop them. 

Restrictive old-school requirements such as the requirement for women to wear appropriate clothing, monitored by the Guidance Patrol aka morality police has encouraged the development of GPS based apps which can warn people who don't believe in the requirement to wear clothes hiding your face to avoid the patrols based on crowdsourced apps similar in concept to Waze.

With a population of around 50 million people under the age of 30 (makes you wonder where the older people went), 20 million Smartphone users and about a million new devices being sold a month, censorship may be a thing of the past and I'm sure we can learn something from these apps as well when it comes to privacy, because it's likely that the use of these apps will also be frowned upon. 

It's also a stark reminder that a country ruled by people who do so by removing basic freedoms from their citizens, does not mean that the people of that country are in agreement and therefore also bad. 
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Apple Is Reportedly Releasing A Cellular Version Of The Apple Watch Later This Year

Apple Is Reportedly Releasing A Cellular Version Of The Apple Watch Later This Year | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Apple's smartwatch may no longer rely on an iPhone connection to download and stream data.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Now we're talking!

I've been saying for a while that the smartphone is going to make a transformation and what we think of as a phone today could be very different in a few years. 

Perhaps Apple agrees with me.
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Finnish mobility service developer secures €14m in funding from likes of Denso, Toyota

Finnish mobility service developer secures €14m in funding from likes of Denso, Toyota | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
MaaS Global, a Helsinki-based developer of a next-generation mobility app, has wrapped up its latest funding round, raising a total of 14.2 million euros.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Mobility as a Service is one of the hottest topics in the transport industry today, especially as related to one of the most important users of transport system, we people.

While on the one hand we have a huge focus on driverless or autonomous cars being developed, on the hand we are maturing by looking for ways to not have to own cars at all.

Finland has been leading the way and companies like MaaS Global who thought they might have their first pilot programme in the  2020's are already active in Helsinki, Finland and will be active in West Midland and Amsterdam before the end of this year.

We see here another example of a car manufacturer investing in the developer, because they see they need to be involved in new models in order to stay relevant, because assuming this initiative is successful, the current model of year on year growth of car sales isn't going to happen. However by focusing on a new value chain, they can cut out parts of the chain that add cost and all car manufacturers will not be winners who collaborate in this likely future model if their survival is predicated on increases of vehicles sold each year.

With successful models like this, coming from entrepreneurs, the concept of building transport models with ever growing highways and concrete storage for cars may morph into the smarter cities we were talking about 20 years ago. 

Once again it seems that a lot of the innovation, while heavily supported by government, comes from left field. This is only part of the puzzle, but companies like MaaS Global are using the same model that created the transport models we use around the world today. Build it and they will come.
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How Digital Disruptors Are Changing The Automotive Industry

How Digital Disruptors Are Changing The Automotive Industry | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
We are all used to self-service on the Web, whether it is managing our own finances to booking a flight. Why can't it be the same for the automotive industry?
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's interesting how little is actually shared about the distribution value chain when it comes to products and when an article like this says that car distributors only make 10% on the cars and their net profit is 1-2%, this is a little misleading when it comes to the value chain and the cost of the car when it leaves the factory.

Like most products, the cost starts at the factory, then if it is exported from the company of manufacture, a margin goes t the export part of the business. Another then goes to a national distributor, which may be a subsidiary or a 3rd party, they clip the ticket, then it goes to a dealership and of course they also clip the ticket and do their best to sell accessories and services in order to bolster their small profit. 

A lot of those accessories come from the national distributor if they are not installed at the factory, as opposed to an assembly plant, adding more cost and mark-up. 

For example, one car brand who will remain nameless but assembles vehicles for sale in New Zealand in Australia, bought high quality car navigation systems, from the Australian distributor of the hardware, and installed it at the assembly plant based on a pre-order. It then got marked up 150% before following the value chain to the national distributor and then to the dealer. A system that cost under $1,000 in Australia cost the New Zealand customer $6,000. 

That was some years ago and the devices are now cheaper, but it was standard practice to make crazy profit out of OEM or aftermarket add ons and the percentages have not changed much, which has led to more people having aftermarket accessories installed locally. 

The services described in this story show how changes to the value chain can in fact contribute to greater volume in car sales (not necessarily a good thing) but also that if you didn't need all those dealerships (who do have contracts that would require compensation), or you change the model for 'new' brands, the costs could come down. 

I watched a news story on CNN interviewing a new car buyer in England who was buying a diesel car "because electric cars are too expensive." A change in how vehicles are sold could make it more practical because we have the same issue with driverless cars.  We don't want to have this innovative technology to be stalled because of hidden costs that make them inaccessible.

No it's not just price, but if we want a lot of driverless models on the road, we have to reduce the fat in the process to make them more accessible. That can start at the distribution level. If it is proven that driverless cars can reduce congestion and improve economies, then perhaps we could also consider tax incentives for people who purchase them and for a period at least for companies that develop services proven to positively impact on the network.
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Driverless tech will leave millions without jobs, won’t allow it: Gadkari - Times of India

Driverless tech will leave millions without jobs, won’t allow it: Gadkari - Times of India | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Union transport minister Nitin Gadkari said that focus of the government is to create more jobs to arrest unemployment. Gadkari said there is already annual shortage of about 22,000 trained drivers in India.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
My first thought was the hustle and bustle of Delhi streets but this is about protecting employment, despite the fact that they have a significant shortage of drivers in India, just as they do in many parts of the world today. 

They are making strides in India with electric bikes, with one now having a range of 240 km on a single charge. 

India sometimes seems like a land of contradictions, where they design and build ultra modern cities, but also show nice innovation like the video I saw a couple of years ago where someone designed an attachment to his motorcycle which turned it into a washing machine. He went to villages and effectively ran a mobile laundromat.
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Trust Your Odometer? Blockchain Test Aims to Turn Tide on Car Tampering - CoinDesk

Trust Your Odometer? Blockchain Test Aims to Turn Tide on Car Tampering - CoinDesk | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
If you've ever bought a used car you'll understand why BigchainDB has developed a platform that tracks vehicle history on a blockchain.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I didn't think this was much of a problem outside of countries like New Zealand where over half of all cars are used imports. I guess once all cars have more sophisticated communications to go with the computing, it will become harder to cheat.
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What Snap Map Says About the Future of Mapmaking

What Snap Map Says About the Future of Mapmaking | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The app’s newest feature combines two major trends in modern cartography: mapping life in real time, and mapping subjective, emotional information.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
The times they are a changin. To me Snapchat (which I have never used) was about sending messages that disappear after you read them and was a lot about either privacy or dating, which has off course become the domain of Tinder.

When I first told people about the new feature that shows where your friends are on a map, they all freaked out about their privacy, which they thought was the original attraction for the app. Now all of a sudden, if they didn't have privacy sorted and location services on, they were visible on a map and many found out by random messages asking them if the sushi was any good, or what they were doing in that part of town.

Now with Snap Map, they seem to be continuing the location concepts where people could leave stories, pictures and even augmented reality objects into the scenery. They can be privately shared memories or information shared publicly of events that are happening right now. 

This is interesting because it could herald a whole new experience, which could show live information ranging anything from a live concert in a park, to a traffic jam, or a political rally or event anywhere in the world in real time. Going out for a Sunday Drive? Snapchat may be the way to find out what is happening, using a map and going and joining the fun.

Once again maps are going social and with over 170 million active daily users, I expect that Instagram, Twitter and Facebook will be flat out trying to come out with a similar solution. Ironically Foursquare had a potentially hugely profitable product and turned it into Swarm App and could have had this market, but their followers left in droves after the changes, told them why, but were ignored.

Tim Ferriss and others have been talking about creating new categories, which is much more successful than being an also ran. I suspect that Snap Map is one of those new categories that everyone else will be rushing to follow. 

Personally I don't think Snap Glasses will be much more popular than the Bebo phone. AR is cool and some people look good in glasses, but they are not convenient. If we can put them into a contact lens without damaging the eye, that might be a different story and features like Augmented Reality, Facial Recognition could become a game changer and maybe a first step to augmented humans. But like a lot of things that I predicted 10 years ago that are happening now, that might be 10 years into the future. 

I'm keen to know what you think of Snap Map. Please share this post and leave a comment.
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'Can't you use GPS?': A train delay, a bus ride gone south and a day to remember

'Can't you use GPS?': A train delay, a bus ride gone south and a day to remember | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
With the North-South Line hit by massive delays during morning rush hour on Friday (Aug 18), Channel NewsAsia's Justin Ong takes a SMRT bus shuttle towards town - and finds himself on an adventure of sorts.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great customer insight story of public transport gone wrong. It reminds me of a trip I made to San Diego for an IBM Convention. 

The welcome at the airport was great, we were meeted and greeted and lined up for coaches to take us to the Marriott which we were told was about a 20 minute journey from the airport. 

The bus driver got lost and it took several phone calls to help him find his way, which was not great after a 12 hour flight. It turned out they didn't have enough drivers and he had been brought down from San Francisco and had never driven in San Diego before. It would have been smart to either install GPS on the bus or provide him with a portable unit. Clearly incorrect assumptions were made and fortunately IBM did an amazing job afterwards including a beach party where the band was the actual (the ones that were still alive) Beach Boys which was amazing. 

Today there really is no excuse for any passenger transport provider other than rail to not have GPS navigation.
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Here are all the active hate groups where you live

Here are all the active hate groups where you live | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
917. That's the number of hate groups operating in the US, according to data from the Southern Poverty Law Center. The Alabama-based nonprofit activist group tracks civil rights and hate crimes and defines a hate group as an organization with "beliefs or practices that attack or malign a
Luigi Cappel's insight:
A picture speaks a thousand words. In my book http://amzn.to/2fT2Mc2 Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services, I wrote about the power of apps to tell you all about the places you are considering moving to. Not just about the house itself, but the environment. 

One of the things that most people are looking for is a safe environment where people are generally like you. A place where this is a reasonable likelihood that you will like, perhaps even become friends with your neighbors. I wrote about crime maps, being close to amenities and commuter routes or public transport.

I never thought I'd be writing this one about active hate groups, nor did I realise how prevalent they are. If you are moving to an area for work, education, or a better life, you sure would want to make sure you are moving somewhere that you and your family will be and feel safe. 

How much research do you do before you make a move? What do you take into consideration? What would you do differently?
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The company that invented Post-It notes is hiding invisible messages in signs to help self-driving cars see the world

The company that invented Post-It notes is hiding invisible messages in signs to help self-driving cars see the world | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
3M is the company behind well-know
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Most people don't know that 3M is the company that makes the traffic signs we see on highways around the world. I only found out when I was involved in a project to help them develop a GPS based application for people to check whether the roadside signs were still in good condition, because frequently contractors were being sent to the wrong sign for repair because of accuracy of the work order location data. They then would waste a lot of time and money trying to locate the correct sign.

Now 3M is looking at providing supplementary data to driverless cars and have a test running with GM where a 'bar code' tells the car computer about things like a dangerous corner ahead or a speed zone change. 

This solves a lot of problems, providing the car can 'see' the 'barcode' because of the same conditions the article talks about where a Tesla struggles with faded or ghost lane markings and sensors struggle with sign reading in ambient light or poor weather conditions.

My Navdy HUD, using HERE car navigation map data is surprisingly accurate when it comes to warning me about permanent speed limits and their locations, however if a change to a speed zone is gazetted, but it hasn't reached my current dataset, or a temporary zone is in place for road maintenance, it's my responsibility as a driver to spot it. Not so easy for a driverless car and very risky for both the road safety crews and the passengers of the car.

I would expect a future sign to have RFiD or some other system to say to the car, "I am here and this is what my signs says and means". This is particularly important where there are slips or washouts, or an active school zone that hasn't made it's location known to the car map data supplier. 

What is fascinating is that many people think routing driverless cars is as simple as having the right technology sensing the road and driving the car and a map. That's the easy part. There are so many more things to consider. I've done a lot of driving in a lot of countries and I'm sure you will agree that many highways and roads are suboptimal when it comes to markings. Add a layer of snow, water, grease, skidmarks, paint or chemical residues and areas with few taxpayers to fund local roads or lesser used highway and chances are your computer will need you. 

If you're talking a fully autonomous car and the driver is facing backwards having a coffee with their fellow passengers, it might lead to close encounters of the undesired kind.


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Why are investors pouring millions into controversial dockless bike hire?

Why are investors pouring millions into controversial dockless bike hire? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Why are investors choosing dockless bike hire?
Luigi Cappel's insight:
A very revealing article. Even if a lot of the bikes are stolen or vandalised, the real payback is in the big data which companies will buy in order to sell you more of whatever it is they deduce you would be interested in. 
Still not a bad thing right? Pick up a bike, drop it off somewhere else and get some exercise while you travel. 
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GPS Service 'Hacks' Traffic Lights For Slower Pedestrians

GPS Service 'Hacks' Traffic Lights For Slower Pedestrians | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
An app called Crosswalk communicates with traffic lights to give pedestrians more time.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Regrettably my first thought was mischievous children abusing the system and was hoping this system could automatically view people crossing to see they hadn't made it all the way across, rather than relying on an estimate. But I do believe the majority of people would treat this honestly. The issue is being able to estimate accurately the amount of time you need. 

From a traffic demand management system, the optimum would be that instead of giving you a little more time, a system monitors the pedestrian and gives them exactly the right amount of time to be safely on the  curb on the other side of the road and then turns the traffic lights green. Over a day systems like that could increase traffic throughput significantly.

I would also love a system with Number Plate Recognition Cameras to catch people running red lights as that is endemic outside my office at a major arterial road crossing and I only just missed being hit myself once when I was about 3/4 of the way across the 4 lanes. I realise that is still very expensive.

I did like the concept of greenwaves for cyclists, although similar risks of red light runners is high. A dear friend passed away in Europe a few years ago when he was t-boned by someone who drove at speed through a red light and killed him as he rode his brand new bike across an intersection at what was a green light for him. 
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Village wants to ban vehicles with display ads

Village wants to ban vehicles with display ads | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Officials in Great Neck Plaza are considering legislation to ban parked vehicles with display advertising from some village roadways to lessen the potential for distracted
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So some folks in Long Island believe that a factor in distracted driving is due to advertising signage and have made it illegal in Great Neck Plaza to park a car with signage on it unless it is a bus, a vehicle for sale or required by law.

That's a really interesting thought but given it is only illegal to park in the village, it would seem to me that it will damage their local economy and doesn't seem very practical given that even the owners of the trucks and vans that provide produce to their retailers and service providers frequently add to their revenue by selling space on their vehicles for advertising.

I always thought it was distracting to have vehicles on the road covered in advertising, especially good eye catching images and messages. Isn't the very sign in the image more eye catching and distracting than the vehicles? I often find myself looking at it on vehicles on the motorway, especially when traffic is slow. I wonder if it is responsible for some of the slow nose to tail accidents. 

I like the left field thinking, but in this case it doesn't make sense to me and sounds like there might be more to the story that they are not telling us.

Nevertheless, how do you feel about vehicles carrying advertising signage on them? Do you look at them when you are driving? Do they distract you?
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Disney Accused of Illegally Tracking Children Via Apps in New Lawsuit

Disney Accused of Illegally Tracking Children Via Apps in New Lawsuit | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The suit claims Disney is violating the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Should we be surprised? There is a reason they call many apps freemium. The question is, how many app developers tell people in their T&C that they are tracking the users and selling their data?

Even if it is anonymous, you need to understand that people don't develop 'free' apps out of benevolence, they want something in return.
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Can technology provide a safer and more effective alternative to prisons?

Can technology provide a safer and more effective alternative to prisons? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Trouble erupted in UK prison the Mount earlier this week as riot police could be seen entering the prison to restore order. Can tech help?
Luigi Cappel's insight:
In my office we frequently talk about people, processes and tools and there is a popular saying that you can't solve people problems with technology. I sometimes bristle at that because it is a simplistic approach. You can use technology as long as you also have people and processes and that's what I think is missing in this opinion piece.

If you follow my blogs you will see countless situations where people have committed crimes either while wearing GPS anklets or having cut them off, set off tamper alarms and continue to offend until the monitoring service or police department finds out the following day.

Buying the technology is the easy part. It's the monitoring which makes the difference and with machine data and new business intelligence systems emerging, it could be much easier to monitor many convicted felons with less people and even be smarter about it.

For example alarms when people convicted of domestic violence come nearthe victim of their attention, by combining the GPS anklet (some of these people are allowed out for work during the day) with GPS tracking on victims' mobiles there is an alert sent out.

One of the common stories is about recidivist offenders who, despite GPS anklets repeat the same types of crimes getting caught through the GPS after committing the same type of crime, where the GPS puts them at the scene and they are caught again. 

Technologies like machine learning could potentially put information together before or while they are committing the crime instead of a week later.
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More reasons why rush-hour traffic is bad for your health

More reasons why rush-hour traffic is bad for your health | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Being stuck in traffic isn't only bad for your nerves; pollution and noise levels also take their toll.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's so much easier to go with the flow, or in this case lack of flow, rather than change your behaviour. Clearly some people have to travel during peak times because they will lose their jobs, or be unable to do them effectively if they don't arrive at work during that time, retailers and office staff such as receptionists or key admin people for example.

However many people don't, but they just do what they always did, when they could take a laptop home and work from home for a couple of hours, clearing emails, making phone calls in a quiet environment and waiting out the mental and physical consequences of driving at peak times. 

A month ago the starter motor on my car broke and the car had to be trailered to the service centre because they had to drop the exhaust system to get at it. My colleagues said they got more emails replied to and from me in one day than they would normally get in a week. I had a pretty good catch up and a very productive day.

Now that was an expensive way to get a day of telecommuting because it cost me $1,000 to have the exhaust system removed, the starter motor reconditioned (Corvette parts like that aren't easy to get new in New Zealand), but I got so much done.

As to health, these new studies are really interesting. I spoke to an air quality scientist at a conference last year about pollution in heavy traffic as to whether it was best to drive with your windows open in heavy traffic or shut. This article effectively backs up what she told me, because closed windows trap the pollutants inside the car, as they come in through your air vents, whereas open windows mean many particulates can flow back out. Not great in winter.

Stress and noise are conditions that we put up with and I've noticed lately that there are a lot more news stories about road rage, with frequently severe consequences. A lot of people I have spoken to in the last year have been on either the giving or the receiving end. What a great way to arrive at work to start your day, or at home when your family is looking forward to telling you about their day, while you are on the verge of losing it after battling yet another day of traffic.

As I said at the beginning, not everyone has the luxury of choosing when to travel, but many do. Maybe not every day, but even one day a week would make a big difference, wouldn't it?
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nuTonomy Self Driving Taxi Trials in Singapore, Boston

nuTonomy Self Driving Taxi Trials in Singapore, Boston | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
nuTonomy Self Driving Taxi Trials in Singapore, Boston - Industry Tap
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Uber and Lyft are both testing self driving taxis and I am still amazed at the irony of Uber and Lyft drivers helping these companies develop a service that makes the drivers themselves obsolete.

These vehicles are being tested around the world and whilst for safety's sake, as it clear that most places aren't mapped sufficiently and markings or identifiable road marks are not of a sufficient standard or visibility for a driverless car to safely drive under all conditions.

Hopefully, given that Uber and Lyft don't own inventory themselves, there will be the opportunity for drivers to own and 'operate' the cars. Of course car manufacturer are also considering cars as a service, so those who don't get collaboration agreements with some of the new startups may simply decide to cut out the middleman (the car dealership) and offer their driverless cars as a service themselves. If you strip away the costs of dealerships and the distribution chain, you remove a lot of the cost of the car.
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Company to offer microchip implants to its employees

Company to offer microchip implants to its employees | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A Wisconsin company says it's about to become the first in the U.S. to offer microchip implants to its employees.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Does this sound like something out of the Manchurian Candidate or other movies where the State monitors people? Maybe, but it's more like what we do with pets.

I had a chat with a colleague the other day about Magpie, the low cost GPS tracker launching in February 2018 by 2 of the Handley brothers and a partner which have a SIM card and can allow you to track almost anything. She wanted to know where her cat went. Magpie will tell her that when it launches next year. There are of course several devices that have similar capability, but Magpie has differences. Just Google it if you want to know more, it's not what this story is about.

This device being used by Three Square Market in Wisconsin doesn't have GPS, but it can provide you with access to vending machines, building access and logging on to your computer, all with security encryption and it's the size of a grain of rice. Easy to put in and easy to remove. They are quick to say it is not 'big brother' in the political sense of the word, but you could consider it a big brother in the way it helps you out. 

This is no isolated instance and of course we already do it with pets. Our dogs are chipped and whilst they always come home if they escape, we would get them back if they lost their ID tags.

This is playing out all over the world and is becoming popular in Sweden http://cbsn.ws/2osWsKk where not only is the chip unlocking your phone, house, office, replaces your PIN number or credit card, but can also contain vital health records and other information. 

Whilst there are new technologies being used for identification (I used retina scanning in the US) including scanning the veins in your hand (which requires that you are alive where this injected chip could be stolen with your hand if the price was high enough to criminals) as a practical tool this makes a lot of sense.

In Three Square Market, the chip is voluntary and the company is picking up the cost. I'd be prepared to consider a device that replaced my key ring, gave me access to my house, office and car, replaced my wallet and provided access to my health information, next of kin, especially if I suffered from a condition like diabetes, epilepsy, was deaf, blood type and identified allergies to name a few things. 

Once again, this depends a lot on where you live and the lifestyle you lead. A few days ago I wrote a blog wondering what a smartphone might look like in 10 years time. This is perhaps a contributing technology. Often there are random developments designed for one thing and then morph into or contribute to something quite different. 

So it would be great to walk to my garage, have the door open, my car unlock and the seat and mirrors to adjust to my prefered position and not have to change my password every 6 weeks on my computer in the office.  I could remove the access cards from my belt and all the keys on my keyring. I guess I'll have to wait a little longer. Imagine if that chip could also BE your phone and access to your virtual assistant that does most of what you use your phone for....

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Transportation Sector Not Taking Cyber Threat Seriously Enough - Via Satellite -

Transportation Sector Not Taking Cyber Threat Seriously Enough - Via Satellite - | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
While transportation cybersecurity spending is expected to increase from $8 billion currently to around $14 billion by 2022, according to ABI Research, the
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Whilst this sounds a lot like an advertisement for security services, it still makes a lot of sense. Even simple things like app based house control and the IoT in general are fraught with risks.

I remember when I got my first Code Alarm (man I miss the fun I had with the remote starter), seeing video of people with code sniffers in cars next to expensive sports cars and capturing the code as people got into them first thing in the morning. Nek minit when the owner went out to get their car the following morning it was gone.

I also remember reading about SCADA systems in Scientific American, including more than one nuclear power plant where the control account, a year after they went live, access codes were Admin and Password123. These are plants that controlled electricity for whole USA states!

I wrote this blog http://bit.ly/2gTk8Wa about Boy Racers confusing the computers of driverless cars 4 years ago. I still believe it can happen. Just look at Black Hat USA, which is on right now: https://www.blackhat.com/us-17/ and as the media stories start to come out, you will see that many of the hackers are teenagers or in their early 20's. It reminds me of the old Kung Fu movies where some students used their craft to commit crimes while the good guys battled them. If you went to 100 young people and offered them a 6 figure sum to hack into a system, do you think that every one of them would say no. 

It's no surprise that Government Agencies now attend these events looking for future security staff, but I would expect organised crime to be watching these people too. Then off course there are those that hack systems just for fun, they probably consider it gaming, it's just that they are real instead of imaginary systems.

It is claimed that there are over 20 billion IoT devices out there in 2017 http://bit.ly/2kw389N. How many of them do you think have security encryption. There area free apps to control a massive number of them from your mobile. I can turn my daughters TV off from outside her house. Imagine if she had an IP based security system instead of one where you have to go to a Pin Pad. 

My nirvana at home is being able to control everything from access to my house, car, heating, lighting, entertainment etc from one app. That's not possible unless I spend more money than it's worth, and it is not worth much to me given I'm not a showoff and it's more out of interest and my love for technology that I want this. I can do without it. If I did have one app, I want to make sure that it had technology like Blockchain and only a few people have access to it. 

I have often criticised car manufacturers for the incompatibility of their V2V communications, but maybe it's a good thing after all. It would be much better if people can hack into only one brand of vehicle rather than all of them. 

Security used to cause latency and storage problems on devices, especially small ones that were battery powered or passive. That no longer needs to be a factor. It does of course add to the cost, but the risks can be great and the brains are active of both sides of the legal fence. 

Is the sector taking this seriously enough? Probably not. Each manufacturer continues to want their USP. When I was involved in the introduction of EFTPOS, the banks took it seriously and I was lucky to live in a country that didn't have many banks. When I was a retail industry committee member of GS1, we established bar code protocols for retail. If the barcode didn't meet the standard the product couldn't be sold in our stores. 

The stakes in the transport industry are higher. 
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