Location Is Every...
Follow
Find
3.6K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
onto Location Is Everywhere
Scoop.it!

Global Logistics Media - TomTom continues to be Europe's largest single-platform fleet management system

Global Logistics Media - TomTom continues to be Europe's largest single-platform fleet management system | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
TomTom passed another milestone by providing its award-winning fleet management system to 15,000 customers actively managing over 175,000 vehicles.
more...
No comment yet.
Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It . affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Don't Text and Drive—Especially If You're Old

Don't Text and Drive—Especially If You're Old | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A new study shows that texting while driving becomes even more dangerous with age.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

On the way home this evening, I watched a few people txting and driving, no biggie, it was on the motorway, so not many corners. Yes I'm being sarcastic. Only two weeks ago I watched video of a car that crashed straight into the back of a stationary vehicle parked on the 'safety strip', no hint of braking involved.

 

So what does this story tell us? Older people don't multitask as well as younger people, No surprises there. However here's the thing. Young people who have good fast reflexes, obviously trying really hard on the simulator still crossed the centreline 25% of the time, when txting while driving.

 

Have a little think about that. How many reasonably sharp corners do you drive around every day when you are dropping off the kids, going to work or doing what you usually do. Now imagine if a mentally agile young driver crosses into your lane while they are on the phone. Let's say only 1 in a hundred are txting, but they cross the centreline 1 in 4 times while they are doing it. 

 

What do you think the odds are of you or someone you know being the victim of someone who thinks they are OK, a good driver, momentarily distracted, taking a chance to look away from the road, just for a few moments? Not much?

 

Here's a statistic for you from 2012 in the USA. In 2012 an estimated 421,000 people suffered injuries due to crashes involving a distracted driver. That's not the number of crashes, but the number of people who were injured where the injuries were reported. 3,328 people died. Last year (2013) over 153 Billion txt messages were being sent a month in the USA.

 

Oh and by the way, for the self congratulatory young people reading this message and being pleased that they are so much less likely to crash while txting, 10% of all drivers under 20 years of age who died, were reported as having been distracted at the time.

 

If it's that important, why not pull over to the side of the road (not the motorway) and do it safely? I wish you a very merry Christmas and a safe and Happy New Year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Traffic jam on toast ... it's the Christmas clog in Sydney - The Daily Telegraph

Traffic jam on toast ... it's the Christmas clog in Sydney - The Daily Telegraph | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
ABANDON hope, all ye festive holiday-makers, the Christmas traffic chaos begins now.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Looks like a lot of the Sydney population go on holiday early. I've been doing a fair bit of research on this problem lately about New Zealand roads. The NZ Transport Agency has also been doing a lot of work on identifying peak times and on Monday, they will have Infographics on their Current Highway Conditions website http://www.nzta.govt.nz/traffic/current-conditions/index.html, which will allow people to identify the dates and times that they should travel based on peak vehicle numbers and the capacity of the most popular routes to take them.

 

A really interesting factoid is that in Christchurch on Christmas Day 2500 cars cross the Waimakariri bridge between 11AM and 12PM. It's not a problem, that is within capacity for the State Highway, its just a unique condition where the Christmas Dinner (lunch) is part of the Kiwi traditional way of life.

 

Another interesting fact from research suggests that despite the severe congestion 40% of motorists never check real time travel information before they leave. On the other hand, 60% say that if they had travel information they would change their travel plans, such as delaying their journey or taking a different route, such as one of the suggestions in this article.

 

There are of course loads of ways you can get travel information, the question is more about whether you look for it or are confronted by it, before it is too late.

 

Do you look for travel information before you go, or do you just go sit in the holiday parking lot and complain that someone should do something about it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Man runs miles to spell out marriage proposal with smartphone GPS tracker - Mirror.co.uk

Man runs miles to spell out marriage proposal with smartphone GPS tracker - Mirror.co.uk | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A runner has proposed to his girlfriend of two years by running miles to spell out the big question on his phone's GPS
Luigi Cappel's insight:

There's a trend happening here of people using GPS to map out words, and particularly marriage proposals. There was recently on a story where a man went all over Japan for a year using GPS to track words on a map.

 

This is very cool and potentially a great way to get people exercising. I have been trying for years now to get Map My Run to consider a feature whereby you can see everywhere you have been on a map, without success. My concept is I want to see where I have been before and the goal is to cover all roads, i.e. go places I haven't been before. They said about 4 years ago that they would add it to the design mix, but maybe I'm the only person that has been asking for it. Maybe soon I'll be able to do that on Google Maps and won't need Map My Run any more. My phone seems to have a pretty good idea of where I am and where I'm going.

 

This would be another way that people could create GPS art, like this, but you can see my point which is the weakness on many of these apps, not just Map My Run. This guy has had to do one word per route and bring up four separate screens to share his message.

 

It's cool, but it feels very much like a Palm Pilot when it should be a Galaxy 5 or iPhone 6. Don't get me wrong I loved my Palm devices so much I kept them.

 

I have to laugh about the new phone with a stylus, representing it as a modern innovation.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luigi Cappel from digitalNow
Scoop.it!

Internet of Things will change everything - Mobile Industry Review

Internet of Things will change everything - Mobile Industry Review | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things will have a profound impact on the way we communicate and live our everyday lives. But just what is it and what can it do for us?

Via Don Dea
Luigi Cappel's insight:

The Internet of Things or IoT has been around for a while. If you control anything from your mobile for example, you are already using it. It might be remote controlling your TV, using a Fitbit, connecting to a GoPro. These are everyday things today and we don't think of them as IoT, we just use them.

 

One of the things that I liked in the story was intelligent furniture. I get frustrated when I watch Science Fiction TV shows that are supposed to be in the future and they are still using the equivalent of today's iPhones. In 20 years time that type of communication will seem as outdated as the bricks we used to use.

 

What do you have in your home today that's connected? Garage door? Printer? Notebooks, Mobiles, Tablets, TV, alarm clocks, fitbit, Go Pro? I'll bet you have a few even though you don't think of them as IoT. I'm about to buy Bluetooth shower speakers for $20. You wouldn't even think of that as being anything sophisticated any more right?

 

Think about basic entertainment. I put my iPhone into my home theatre and control Spotify from my iPad. Not only do I get the music I want, the latest tracks on The Billboard Top 100 but my phone is also charging at the same time.

 

Buying any Bluetooth or WiFi devices for Christmas? If the answer is yes, then you are buying into the IoT. The cool thing today is that we are just doing it, its not about the acronyms or jargon, its just how we live today.

more...
Be-Bound®'s curator insight, December 5, 10:13 AM

The IoT will completely change the way we do things ! It's a major change in paradigm and this article prooves it we numerous examples !

John Presutti's curator insight, December 14, 9:13 AM
  • GE estimates that the “Industrial Internet” will add $10-$15 trillion to worldwide GDP by 2035
  • Cisco says the “Internet of Everything” may add $19 trillion in economic value by 2022
Jean-Christophe Gilquin's curator insight, December 15, 6:24 AM

L'internet des objets va profondément changer nos modes de vies et notre manière de communiquer.

Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Snoop Dogg: the GPS industry's secret weapon against Google

Snoop Dogg: the GPS industry's secret weapon against Google | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
You know what TomTom has that Google Maps Navigation doesn't? Snoop. D. O. Double G. Voice Skins, the same company that brought Homer Simpson to the world
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I have to say that the novelty wears off after a while, nevertheless voice skins on your nav have proven to be a huge success for TomTom. It is very smart marketing and a way of renewing your nav over and over again. I spend a lot of time looking at changing markets and how classic business models need to keep reinventing themselves. TomTom is a really good example of a business that keeps doing that.

 

I remember people saying the market would be saturated 5 years ago, but people are still buying nav units because they are still the best at what they do. That should get a few people going. I'm looking forward to your comments.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

LexisNexis Study: Fleet Managers Want Telematics to Cut Insurance Costs - ForConstructionPros.com

LexisNexis Study: Fleet Managers Want Telematics to Cut Insurance Costs - ForConstructionPros.com | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Despite low awareness of usage-based insurance facilitated by telematics, 27% of commercial fleet managers who know about the programs buy them
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I've been advocating this for years. There are many reasons for the use of fleet management and standard reporting features (some with driver alerts) including harsh breaking, harsh cornering, speeding, length of time between breaks, load weight have been reported to drivers, safety officers and company management for years.

 

I've said for a long time that there is a multiple value proposition for insurance companies that can provide major benefits.

 

Insurance companies are companies are all about risk. When it comes to freight the risk is very high. It is not just about the truck, the driver and the contents, it is about consequences. It might be damage to the roading infrastructure, it might be hazardous chemicals that can damage the environment and of course there are third parties.

 

Just yesterday we had a fatal accident in New Zealand between a van and a tanker truck. 2 people died and 7 were injured. When there are incidents like this, it is much easier to unravel some of the details of what happened. How fast was the truck going (including vs the speed limit), when did they first apply the brakes and how did the electronic baffles in the tanker holds deploy. Were airbags activated and did they deploy. There is so much data available in fleet management systems today, it's the road equivalent of a black box in a plane.

 

Drivers can be assessed individually and trained based on daily and weekly reports and companies can also be assessed on their commitment to improvement and of course green driving, harsh acceleration for example often results in that horrible black soot that fills the atmosphere.

 

Companies can then be offered reduced rates based on their reports and rewarded for sharing full results of their fleet management reports.

 

Of course these reports include location based data. This means that insurance companies not only have risk profiles on drivers and companies, but also on locations. They can identify which routes have higher risk than others and report that back to their customers.

 

Insurance companies have a great opportunity to participate in the training of road users and to reward those drivers and companies who drive more safely than others (including when the driver or vehicle in an accident situation was not at fault). By reinforcing the statistics and information back to their clients, they have the ability to make our roads much safer for everyone.

 

The focus would be on positive reinforcement and training and of course there are a world of side benefits. Greener driving helps our environment, fewer accidents means less injuries and deaths, improved economies where just in time business models can rely on their deliveries; and reduced congestion caused by road and lane closures due to accidents and incidents.

 

I haven't even touched on the other industries mentioned in this report, like family vehicles, teenage drivers etc. I believe they will be served by other solutions, more likely low cost mobile apps, but the major benefits for insurance companies are in the freight industry because when things go wrong and trucks are involved, the subsequent financial and human costs tend to be far greater.

 

The point of the story is that these technologies are not just hardware and telemetry that goes into vehicles, its how it is used to encourage better and more consistent behavior.

 

Bottom line, this technology will save lives and reduce costs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Cellphone tracking: Find an address? Easy. But new devices can calculate your ... - Washington Post

Cellphone tracking: Find an address? Easy. But new devices can calculate your ... - Washington Post | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
New devices can pinpoint what floor you’re on, aiding rescue crews but setting off privacy groups’ alarms.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

There are now about 100 million smartphones that feature barometric sensors. This is very interesting technology and while the primary purpose for barometers was to monitor changes in the weather, this opens up some very interesting new capability.

 

One of the exciting opportunities this opens up is being able to locate people, not only by their GPS coordinates, but also what their altitude is and therefore what floor they are on. Imagine for example that someone has dialed 911 and needs urgent medical assistance, but is disoriented. The ability to track that call and identify that a person is on the 15th floor of a commercial building could be a life saver.

 

Retailers are constantly seeking that magical solution to identify where people are in a shopping precinct or mall. This again can help in pinpointing the location of shoppers without requiring the use if Bluetooth or other LBS technologies.

 

Of course this raises security concerns, especially if you don't have the ability to turn that information off. When it comes to law enforcement, safety, security and providing evidence of a crime that has or may be about to be committed, I'm fine with this concept and particularly situations where innocent people can use location based services to prove they were not at the scene of a crime.

 

It's interesting to me that we have long seen these sorts of technologies on TV shows, where high tech law enforcement agencies use it to find terrorists and others and tracking people by their mobiles is an every day thing. Now we're talking reality and its getting interesting.

 

So locating people with special needs has always been an interest of mine. Elderly people, people with disabilities like being blind, dementia, health conditions like diabetes that can cause people to become disoriented or lose consciousness. I have long looked for viable devices and been involved in R&D with a number of them, but the ubiquitous mobile has the potential to change all that.

 

What other things could you do with this technology? How about fitness training? The barometer can help apps know when you are climbing stairs and can count how many you climbed. It can be used to monitor inclinometer for people doing training for sport, because publicly available web maps mostly don't provide this. functionality. I'm sure cycling, running and other fitness apps soon will. The iPhone 6 comes with a health app that counts stairs for you, so you may already be using this functionality in your new mobile.

 

I recently had the pleasure of flying in a Hoverwing, a hybrid combination of plane and hovercraft. The pilot used his iPhone to get information about where we went and emailed me a picture of the track. Glider pilots can now use this technology which is much cheaper and lighter than conventional technology. For a glider pilot of course the lighter the craft the more lift,

 

For those of you who have scoffed in the past about face and voice recognition, tracking people and using big data analysis to track people and interpret their behavior, location and where they are likely to go next as something that will remain on SciFi movies, it's time to face facts. We live in a new world. I'm just glad that I live in a democratic country where it is unlikely that this technology will be abused by those in authority.

 

Of course the technology can be abused very easily by people with less benevolent intentions and this is where standards to protect our personal safety and privacy need to be developed, and quickly, because it can be very easily be abused to commit crimes against people. Whilst law enforcement is getting smarter, there are levels of  the criminal element that are doing likewise. There are of course loads of less intelligent criminals and as you will read in many of my blogs, particularly http://luigicappelwordpress.com and http://solomoconsulting@wordpress.com people are being caught daily having stolen mobiles, cars, handbags, even hay bales! Something I love to read about these busts is that they also tend to find lots of other stolen property and other illegal items when they catch these people.

 

As long as the laws are in place to protect the innocent and our inherent right to privacy, inasmuch as that exists any more, I think these are very positive and exciting developments. How about you?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
Farid Mheir's curator insight, November 23, 11:52 AM

Cell phones can now be tracked inside buildings using barometric sensors. Great for 911 calls, it also raises a lot of privacy concerns.

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, November 25, 2:10 AM

As great as this development is for saving lives and pinpointing people in emergencies, there are serious issues revolving around privacy.  Perhaps well-intentioned people are getting a bit too involved in the personal lives of others, often in the guise of helping them.  I don't like the idea of someone being able to track you every minute.  Aloha, Russ.

Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Privacy Protections Unite Carmakers - Sci-Tech Today

Privacy Protections Unite Carmakers - Sci-Tech Today | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Nineteen automakers accounting for most of the passenger cars and trucks sold in the U.S. have signed onto a set of principles they say will protect motorists' privacy in an increasingly digital era.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It's interesting how information pops up at the same time by coincidence when you are looking. I was just reading about Carnegie Mellon's Privacy Grade site http://privacygrade.org/home which identifies Android apps (Apple to come) where your information is likely to be shared with 3rd parties such as advertisers.

 

An example of one that rates a C (A is trustworthy and D is not good) is Angry Birds. What's of real concern to me is that you might let your children play games like Angry Birds on your phone, not knowing that information about you, your location, behaviors, possibly even contact data may be sold to advertisers or others. If you have Angry Birds on your mobile device, your information is being shared with Facebook, Admob, MoPub and other advertisers to name a few.

 

Amongst other things this game can access your phone number, current state, device ID, carrier and a lot more. I don't know if that only applies to the Freemium version, or if you are doing the same when you pay. The important thing is, did you know that 'you' had authorized that?

 

It's great to see car manufacturers understanding the implications of privacy. Now it may be that privacy is already a thing of the past despite laws designed to protect us. The thing that these brands have worked out is that people may love the features but value their privacy and therefore choose not to buy a particular car because the manufacturer is sharing information with advertisers about where and when you are driving it.

 

I want to know how far away the nearest gas station is when I'm running low and I think it would be cool to have my car not only tell me that I have been driving for 2 hours and should take a break (which it does) but also where I can go to grab a coffee at a place with a good reputation and on my route is. The same with traffic, tell me there is a major incident ahead and suggest either an alternate route or somewhere good to wait it out, based on my preferences or interests. BUT, don't ever share my data with a 3rd party without my express informed consent.

 

This is a very good move on behalf of these brands, who are showing not only that they want to be trustworthy, but that they understand implications of privacy and customer needs. Intelligent Transport Systems are the way of the very near future and we need standards. We need to protect people who don't understand the technology and lets face it, that's probably most of us.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

New Hacking Threat Could Impact Traffic Systems - NBC Chicago

New Hacking Threat Could Impact Traffic Systems - NBC Chicago | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Motorists drive by traffic lights every day and trust they will work. But NBC 5 Investigates found that as more cities turn to wireless traffic systems, some of those systems are unprotected and open to...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It's a wonder this hasn't happened before. In a copy of The Futurist some time ago there was an article on SCATS systems (the systems often used to control everything from power utility company networks through to traffic lights in cities around the world.

 

One of the things they discovered in many sites was that the default passwords that these systems have when they are first installed, something like 'PASSWORD' was still the default. That means that anyone who found a random way of getting access to the systems could automatically get in without even having any computer skills.

 

Do you have any systems where the password is something obvious like Password, Password123 or Admin? Might be a good place to start looking....... At least don't make it any easier than it needs to be!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Google Glass and other tech gadgets make check-ins a breeze - News24

Google Glass and other tech gadgets make check-ins a breeze - News24 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Virgin Atlantic aims to use the cool Google Glass gadget to make check-in at airports easier.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This sounds more like a gimmick than a practical application to me. We already have smart digital passports and mobile apps from airlines that include digital boarding passes. Why do we need someone with Google Glasses to look at our passport?

 

Great PR for Virgin, but I'm sure they can do much better from a practical perspective.

 

What do you think?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Self-Driving Buses Could Really Reinvent Transportation Systems - CleanTechnica

Self-Driving Buses Could Really Reinvent Transportation Systems - CleanTechnica | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Congested cities, troubling unemployment due to the absence of transit, and environmental issues from automobile pollution all point towards the need for much greater development of mass transportation.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Would you hop on a driver-less bus? The concept makes a lot of sense and I have read a number of stories about public transport pods that are driver-less and connect to each other on freeways or bus lanes in busy areas.

 

I suspect this will be the way of the future, it does make a lot more sense than driver-less cars because it is easier to regulate and control, including the specific routes they take.

 

I've been on driver-less trains at airports and they work fine. However I have one significant concern about driver-less public transport and that is about keeping passengers safe from each other.

 

I have been in many situations around the world where passengers have been unruly, or potentially dangerous. In those situations, knowing that there is a driver, a conductor or other official person who is keeping an eye on what is happening on their PT vehicle makes all the difference.

 

If the vehicle has no one on board but he passengers, then I would have a problem with using it, at least at certain times of day. Whist I would expect these vehicles to have cameras, just as the bus and train stations have, I doubt they would deter a drunk, or a criminal from taking advantage of a situation where they felt they could get away with it.

 

If you then have to have someone on board to keep the peace, they could just as well be driving, couldn't they? What o you think?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

New York City lowers its speed limit to save lives, and a lot of impatient people freak out

New York City lowers its speed limit to save lives, and a lot of impatient people freak out | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The city copes at 25 miles per hour.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is an interesting story and I would love an opinion from you New Yorkers who are following my blogs.

 

From what I saw of a lot of NYC the average traffic was so heavy that it would struggle to do 30MPH, actually that's probably more Manhattan to be fair.

 

I would love to see some statistics as to the reason for the fatalities. I wonder how many of the pedestrians that are being killed aren't paying attention, aren't crossing at pedestrian crossings, or at least those saying cross now. How many of them are listening to headphones and can't hear what is going on around them? Will slowing down traffic by 5MPH save lives?

 

I'm not saying it won't, just looking for feedback on the science and rationale behind this decision.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Automotive infotainment systems can be good and bad - Pittsburgh Post Gazette

Automotive infotainment systems can be good and bad - Pittsburgh Post Gazette | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Powerful in-dash infotainment systems have become a big selling point in new cars, but they’re also one of the features most likely to give drivers fits.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This article makes a very good point. The cars that have the most impressive list of new infotainment systems are typically the most expensive, which kind of makes sense. But the owners of those cars are typically baby boomers with the least technical expertise.

 

If I think back to the day when I was teaching people how to use their $6,000 OEM car navigation systems, they were typically people who were 60+ and struggled with much more than txt messaging on their mobiles. Now we're talking not just navigation but WiFi, streaming music, cameras, social media, location based services, proximity warnings and much more!

 

Bring on the driver-less car because some people won't have the capability to handle all the features as well as drive their car! We love the IoT Internet of Things but the distractions are becoming a real concern and if we're not careful it will become illegal to use the cool features coming out in new cars.

 

The problem for car manufacturers is that they have programmed us to always want new features and cup holders and reversing cameras just aren't enough any more.

 

Have we forgotten the primary purpose of the motor vehicle? Isn't the primary function still to get us safely to our destination?

 

Is there a lesson here for public transport providers? Maybe they should be making buses and trains as much fun as driving?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

See inside NYC holiday windows with Google Maps - New York Daily News

See inside NYC holiday windows with Google Maps - New York Daily News | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
See inside Macy's, Bloomingdale's and other holiday window displays with Google Maps.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

So here's a glimpse of the future. Imagine if street view was able to be updated whenever there were new images to share? Imagine a world where each Google smartphone had a piece of software like Panoramio whereby each image of sufficient quality could identify where it is in location, could be picked up by Google and stitched into street view, updating that piece of the map puzzle.

 

If someone at Google isn't already working on a project to create exactly that I'll cut my hair off, seeing as I don't have a hat to eat.

 

Given that Google owns the operating system for a very large percentage of all phones and has software on most of the remainder, it would be very easy to do. Obviously they would have to deal with processing the data, but imagine (totally assuming they also have privacy covered) being able to see the cherry blossoms in Tokyo, the tulips in Holland, a line up for the Rolling Stones Concert in Madison Square Gardens and the latest Christmas light show on Fremont Street in Vegas.

 

Instead of looking at a Street-view map that's 2 years out of date, you could have one where parts of it are current at any given time. Google could then create location based games which would give people missions which involved taking pictures to fill in the gaps that haven't been recently updated.

 

All this needs now is for Google to acknowledge that they are either doing it, or that I gave them the idea, they could maybe offer me the job of setting this up globally, that could be fun, or at least a set of Google Glasses and the latest Smartphone to tether it to and I could be one of the first of the new wave of people helping to build this new copy of reality. I would start with some local Christmas highlights like Auckland's tree decorated with hundreds of bicycles, or some of the amazing New Zealand streets where every house in the street is lit up for Christmas, with amazing displays of yuletide.

 

Did you read it here first? How long do you think it will be before this crowd-sourced idea takes off? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Putting the User in the Driver's Seat of the Connected Car - Wired

Putting the User in the Driver's Seat of the Connected Car - Wired | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The auto industry is racing to deliver on a grand vision for developing the “Connected Car” in which location technologies are integrated with relevant content to deliver a uniquely personalized online driving experience designed for those behind...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is a very well thought out and written article. If you are interested in the direction of the Connected Car, I recommend having a read.

 

A couple of very important points for me. One is that Google, whilst it has some very clever technology, is not (yet at least) capable of delivering true car navigation. It doesn't have the detail or the functionality, although it is fantastic from the perspective of a location based system.

 

A key issue is access to connectivity. Yesterday I was looking for evidence of a car crash that had been reported in New Zealand and  wanted to see a congestion map to see the impact of a closed national highway. Looking at the map it was clear that cellular coverage was week (or at least from Android mobiles, because it didn't show anything in the area of the crash, where I expected to see evidence of slow or stationery vehicles. I can only assume that mobile coverage was the problem.

 

Connected cars won't be very connected if they can't talk to a cell tower, unless manufacturers also look at mesh networks, but as far as I know most of the effort in that space is for late model cars of one brand e.g. Volvo to talk to each other. Not many people buy late model Volvo's in New Zealand.

 

There was also mention of car manufacturers who tie in to certain technologies, like the Volkswagen that had an iPhone cradle built in. Interesting move. Another very key fact is that many car manufacturers that put OEM car nav systems into their cars invest in the system and the initial map (typically one free update within a month of buying the car, but not ongoing) or they put in the map, but not the real time traffic solutions, which are equally important and available today. I do appreciate that the build design and OEM parts and partners are decided a couple of years before the first of a model is built. That means that smart ITS tech companies need to be involved in the car design much earlier. That means more car manufacturers need to consider mobile and ITS as part of their strategy, today is the information age. Safety is critical but location based computing will sell tomorrow's cars.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Maps: The countries that have been hardest hit by extreme weather - Washington Post (blog)

Maps: The countries that have been hardest hit by extreme weather - Washington Post (blog) | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Low- or lower-middle income developing countries are affected most.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I've read and written quite a lot about climate change and there are many who say it is not true, that climates are cyclic (yes they do have patterns) and it's all just scaremongering. So tell me a month in recent years that hasn't produced a record of some climate related kind. It might be hottest, coldest (I did say climate change), wettest, stormiest, windiest etc.

 

I've also written about climate refugees coming to New Zealand http://thefuturediaries.com/2014/11/21/the-climate-change-refugees-are-coming-to-new-zealand/ from the future, but if I read this graph it would suggest parts of New Zealand are also at risk.

 

Would I come back to or stay in New Zealand, yes definitely, not just because it has plenty of good drinking water and isn't subject to the same extremes as places like Asia, USA, Europe, the Pacific Islands and even some places in Australia, but also because we are a very tolerant multicultural society. Sure we have our rednecks, crime and other problems, but they are minor and rare in comparison to many 1st World countries. When a criminal escapes custody in New Zealand, the whole country knows who they were and what their circumstances were. Would that be the case in California?

 

Climate change is happening and it will bring good and bad. We will have more subtropical storms in New Zealand and  climate will force agriculture to rethink the best places to farm and what products are best suited to certain locations. We will be able to grow crops that we haven't been able to grow here before, it brings new opportunities. We have issues with Ozone holes, but I've never seen acid rain, or huge forest fires, or heard people complain about having to drink recycled storm-water and having to buy bottled water. We have plenty of fresh water and natural energy resources.I wouldn't buy a house at sea level on the beach unless I had a great insurance company and a back up plan, or was rich, I'm happy being 10 minutes walk from the beach.

 

This map should be compulsory viewing for people around the world. It should be used by teachers in schools to understand why countries rate differently to others, to explore ways of improving their conditions, or at least be prepared for what is to come.

 

So has anything changed in your area? Have you had recent climate/weather extremes? Do you ever wonder about the fact that every few weeks there is a storm, or a drought or giant hail or extra high rainfall, tornadoes where they aren't known, conditions that are the worst they have been in 100 years? Just watch how often those extremes are reported. It's more prevalent than you might have thought and it is not getting better. Many scientists and world health and safety authorities are suggesting that we have brought the world past it's tipping point and yet there still seems to be a political desire to not to much about it.

 

A good starting point is interactive maps like this to increase awareness and to just be aware of what is going on, at least in your neck of the woods. What will today bring? What's happening in the Philippines this weekend for starters. But also just watch in your neighborhood, your country and your neighboring countries. Not scouring the media looking for extremes, just look at every day occurrences and  think whether that is the same as it was 30 years ago. Think about what it might be like in 20 years time. Don't care? Do you have children or maybe grandchildren? What is in store for them and did we have a part to play in creating that and can we have a part in reducing the impact, even if we are past a tipping point.

 

I loved the recent comments by Stephen Hawking last week, which echo what I have been saying for years. If we had artificial intelligence perfected, the Hal 9000 scenario would make a lot of sense, This planet's chances of survival in supporting life other than cockroaches, scorpions and other species that can apparently survive almost anything, would be much improved if humans were no longer around.

 

I'm getting off my Sunday Soapbox now. I kind of like being human, I like living and I love experiencing new things. I also accept a responsibility that I share with all of you that in order for my descendants to have a safe environment to live in for the foreseeable future something has to change and it starts with each individual human being. It starts with acknowledgement that we have problems. 

 

What little thing could you do today? Pick up some rubbish, recycle some plastic, teach your kids about climate change. Plant something in your garden. Find out more about what's happening in your part of the world. You are the problem and you are the system. If it's to be, it's up to me.....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

'Google Maps' for drug dealers launches online - showing nearest cannabis sellers - Mirror.co.uk

'Google Maps' for drug dealers launches online - showing nearest cannabis sellers - Mirror.co.uk | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
New 'deep web' site Map Dealers means that cannabis users can search a map for their closest dealer
Luigi Cappel's insight:

When I first saw this headline, I thought Colorado or other places where cannabis is legal, but this seems to be a lot more blatant than that.

 

I can't see why law enforcement agencies would have a problem with this. It would seem that on one side it is a shopping list for people who want to buy drugs, on the other side it is a shopping  list for people who want to bust them. Sounds like bag half full for both of them:)

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Mobile apps mesh public safety and civic engagement - Statesman Journal

Mobile apps mesh public safety and civic engagement - Statesman Journal | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Mobile apps mesh public safety and civic engagement
Luigi Cappel's insight:

5 really interesting apps described here give a great example of location based apps that are low cost and can save lives. Need someone with CPR skills while you're waiting for the EMS to arrive? Want to know where crimes are bring committed? Crowd sourcing is a low cost and powerful way of engaging communities and the success stories are starting to come in.

 

Check out this great story and see what's around. There is bound to be an app or an idea here for you to pursue.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

The Best Time To Plan Your Thanksgiving Travel, According To Google Maps Data

The Best Time To Plan Your Thanksgiving Travel, According To Google Maps Data | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Don't plan on driving the day before Thanksgiving.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It's really interesting to be reading this Infographic in an Australian business people, in New Zealand given that neither country celebrates Thanksgiving.

 

Nevertheless we do all spend a lot of time trying to work out when the best times are to travel on long weekends and that's an area I've been putting a lot of effort into lately.

 

The last thing you want to be doing on a long weekend is spending half of it stuck in traffic. You also don't want to be cutting it short, after all that's not the point of a long weekend.

 

Interesting to see a significant reduction in people driving last year vs the year before. There could of course be a lot of reasons for this and looking at what I've seen comparing our last long weekend in New Zealand it doesn't appear as thought we were traveling less this year vs last year. I'm currently working through stats to try and identify what did happen through our key corridors, which is a combination of many factors. Hopefully we will be able to use this information to help people make their travel decisions on Boxing Day and 2 January.

 

One of the most important things is that around 40% of people don't check travel information before they get into their cars. Why would you not want to know what traffic is like before you go?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Adobe Personalizes Mobile Location Features To Drive Real-Time Engagement - MediaPost Communications

Adobe Personalizes Mobile Location Features To Drive Real-Time Engagement - MediaPost Communications | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Adobe on Tuesday will launch several location marketing services aimed at personalizing the mobile experience for consumers.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

The interesting thing to me out of this is that the location based alerts come up on the phone screen even when it is locked, so you can have hands free information. Of course it won't stay on the screen and there is the risk that you are now distracted driving if you have to log on to view more.

 

Who will take responsibility when you crash because you were booking your coffee with a free muffin at the gas station ahead with a simple one-click?

 

How do we make sure that the messages we get are not frequent and are highly relevant. If marketers don't deliver on those two elements, there will not be huge value. I think the smartphones need to introduce features such as voice control, even while the phone is in locked mode.

 

The good one for me is things like real time traffic information. Tell me there is a road closure up ahead with a simple message, in fact why should I have to see the message at all? Why not just tell me and then let me use voice commands to open up my GPS car nav application so I can tell it to find me an alternate route, or if there isn't one, give me the ability to reserve a table and have my latte ready and waiting on my arrival. I'm even happy to pay for it in advance knowing that the security on my mobile payment app is covered by my bank.

 

Just make sure that whatever you tell me is relevant to my needs. Of course that's where the privacy issue comes in. How do you find our what I'm interested in and under which circumstances? http://solomoconsulting.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/privacy-protections-unite-carmakers-sci-tech-today/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Shared space: Why the best thing for some streets is a little bit of chaos

Shared space: Why the best thing for some streets is a little bit of chaos | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
So many Americans fail to understand that uncertainty can be a good thing.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I would love to see this work, but the skeptic in me wonders if it would work anywhere remotely near where I live. Having said that, there is the odd street in Auckland that works like this. I'm not sure we are mature enough as drivers for this to work in an urban square.

 

It would be great to see this tested in a flat area such as Christchurch where there are more bikes. I've been to several conferences and seminars that talk about open spaces, green spaces, people friendly spaces, but most of it is theory and there is little happening in the area of urban redesign.

 

What do you reckon? Could it work here?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luigi Cappel from Evolution of transportation: SEAMless mobility - Shared, Electric, Autonomous (driverless), Multimodal mobility offered in an integrated way to consumers
Scoop.it!

NXP, Honda, Siemens and Cohda Wireless launch smart car and ITS corridor in Europe

NXP, Honda, Siemens and Cohda Wireless launch smart car and ITS corridor in Europe | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Published: November 12, 2014| Eindhoven, Netherlands NXP, Siemens, Honda, Cohda Wireless and forward-thinking politicians come together in an unprecedented move to make European traffic smarter, gr...

Via Catherine Kargas
Luigi Cappel's insight:

Self driving cars are coming and having specific corridors is a great idea. It allows the case to be proven and will reward people or businesses that invest in the technology.

 

I think the same thing should happen for hybrid and electric cars. Why not give them special lanes in return for their contribution to the environment.

 

The one thing I didn't read in this story, which I feel is one of the most important elements is the number of people in the vehicle. When we talk about green driving, we should also consider other elements such as the space a vehicle takes up with only one person in it.

more...
Catherine Kargas's curator insight, November 13, 4:20 PM

uniformity across countries will be key

Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Semi driver blames GPS after plowing through public park - KTRK-TV

Semi driver blames GPS after plowing through public park - KTRK-TV | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Officials say a tractor trailer driver is blaming his GPS after he plowed through a public park Tuesday, heavily damaging two historic bridges in Milwaukee
Luigi Cappel's insight:

So here we are again, a driver ignores signs on the road saying this is for pedestrians and a cycle path and drives on through until his truck is totally stuck and blames the GPS. If you follow my blog you will find countless stories like this. The BMW that drove down steps into a canal, people who drive into the sea, the list is endless and the occurrence frequent.

 

Now there is a slight risk that his nav did show the cycle and pedestrian bridge as a road, in which case we have the answer as to why we have drivers to interpret what they see through the window and signs that tell them what they are seeing in case they still don't get it, hence the reason the driver was charged and the would have had an interesting discussion with his boss.

 

However, here's the rub:

 

1. Not all navigation systems are equal and have quality maps for all of the country. They are only as good as their data source and the effort that is put into creating and maintaining the map. Having been in a company that makes maps for 8 years, I know exactly how hard it is to maintain high quality, spatially accurate and current maps. I know what that costs. We lost clients who wanted to sell sub $100 complete car nav units with free lifetime map updates, competing on price instead of quality. We couldn't provide them with maps and stay in business, for what they wanted to pay. So they went elsewhere to cheaper maps. I have to tell you there are consequences to these decisions.

 

2. What if you have driver-less cars, using maps that show locations as roads, using navigation systems with sub par maps. The manufacturer or owner may have purchased the system in good faith, just as consumers today buy sub $100 navigation systems with lifetime free maps thinking they will get high quality data for the entire country, urban and rural and it isn't high quality data? As they say in the computer industry, GIGO or Garbage In, Garbage Out.

 

Have you bought a cheap nav unit? Ever had it give you information that could have got you into trouble if you hadn't correctly interpreted the data combined with what you saw through your windscreen? I'd welcome your feedback and stories.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Car Dealership's GPS Tracking System Saves Philadelphia Kidnap Victim - GPS World magazine

Car Dealership's GPS Tracking System Saves Philadelphia Kidnap Victim - GPS World magazine | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Car Dealership's GPS Tracking System Saves Philadelphia Kidnap Victim
GPS World magazine
A GPS tracking device helped Philadelphia police rescue a woman who was kidnapped Sunday evening and to apprehend the suspect who abducted her.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

There are many companies now lending money to people who might otherwise not get a loan, but need a car to get work. The systems monitor their movements to make sure they are going to work and monitoring their activities, ostensibly to ensure they can pay back their loan.

 

The smart companies do not want their clients to default on their loans and the customers understand the implications of their new vehicle being tracked, well at least some of them do. Some obviously are just too dimwitted to realise that their car is now the equivalent of a GPS ankle bracelet.

 

I won't go into any detail about other things that can be detected using business analytics using this technology. Let's just say that if you have hit hard times, are an honest and hardworking individual, you have nothing to loose.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luigi Cappel
Scoop.it!

Turn Your @Foursquare Check-Ins into a #History Lesson with @hoffrocket's @Fourstalgia [review]

Turn Your @Foursquare Check-Ins into a #History Lesson with @hoffrocket's @Fourstalgia [review] | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
One of my favorite new apps that use the Foursquare API is Fourstalgia. It's a very cool hack project built by Jon Hoffman @hoffrocket, an engineer at
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I love this concept, but like many applications, it appears to be mostly focused on the USA and Europe. I live in New Zealand and whilst there are amazing historic photo libraries here, they are not available on the service which this app uses, so I guess I won't be installing it. It was worthy of mention. If you live somewhere that is supported with historic images, I would recommend trying this out.

more...
No comment yet.