Location Is Everywhere
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Bus Checker, the UK's Best Selling Travel App Comes to NYC - PR Web (press release)

Bus Checker, the UK's Best Selling Travel App Comes to NYC
PR Web (press release)
Initially launched in London in 2012 and rolled out to cover the rest of Britain, Bus Checker has become the UK's best selling travel app*.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

No surprises, the winner of GeoSmart's Location Innovation Awards in 2007 was a similar app. 

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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon

Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
I've been reading a book called 'Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do' by Tom Vanderbilt, which resonates very well with me. Now I'm no petrol head, but I still like driving my car and it is still m...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It only takes a little pain to have people hop in their cars. A wet day, having to stand on a bus, or having to stand on the side of the road and watch the bus go by. Driving is part of our culture. We are how we move. Even in cities where driving is impractical, like Tokyo, I have friends who still own a car, almost a status symbol because of the costs of even parking your car. They go driving in the weekend and enjoy the countryside.

The most popular and profitable radio time, even today when so many people are connected to their smartphones for entertainment, is drive-time. Of course this is also when we get our critical traffic reports.

We don't even want to get out of our cars. An estimated 22% of ALL restaurant meals in America are ordered through the window of a car.

I really like the footer, that a pedestrian is someone who has just parked their car.

Just last night I was reading in the news that sales of new passenger cars in New Zealand have gone up in the first months of this year by 3.6% breaking a 26 year record. Sales of commercial vehicles for the first four months in this country are up 14% on the same period last year.

Still think more people are ditching their cars?

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What would we do if GPS failed?

What would we do if GPS failed? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
As our dependence on the Global Positioning System grows, a potential failure of its satellites would spell disaster.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
We are becoming more and more reliant on GPS. Think about just the simplest of things, finding our way around. Do you still have a paper map? What if Google or whatever device you use for navigation stops working?

How many apps do you have that use location on your smartphone that you take for granted? What about ships and planes, fleet management systems for trucks. Let's not even start with driverless cars?

We are becoming more and more reliant on this technology and whilst there are new land-based technologies being developed, commercial and military users are heavily reliant on this technology.
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Two Canadian teens so distracted by Pokemon Go game they leave country

Two Canadian teens so distracted by Pokemon Go game they leave country | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Two Canadian teens were so absorbed while playing Pokemon Go that they inadvertently crossed into the US and were detained by Homeland Security agents on Thursday.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a whole new twist on #TheGPSMadeMeDoIt and there are now multiple cases of serious incidents were people have been injured playing Pokemon Go.

In Bosnia, players had to be stopped from playing in an area containing landmines and in Incinitas San Diego, 2 players fell of a 100 foot cliff edge.

It would seem to be only a matter of time before a player causes a road crash and there is not much that can be done about it other than education, because players are encouraged to play on public transport, which stops the game makers from disabling the game at a speed beyond normal walking or running, because there are plenty of cases where it is legitimate, even as a passenger in a car.

A few days ago someone said to me, this is just a fad and it will be over soon. Sorry, I totally disagree. Pokemon Go will certainly have a limited lifespan as did Ingress, However, I believe you can measure that in many months or perhaps even a year before it tails off because of the way it is being launched to limited markets. The financial impact on Nintendo's share value certainly won't be hurting Niantic's reputation. It has taken a few years for them to become a real overnight success, but they have really put the concept of Real World Gaming on the map.

Sometimes it's just about timing. Back in 2009 I was helping on creating channels for GeoVector's World Surfer project https://luigicappel.wordpress.com/2009/10/22/blogfade-and-android-mobile/ which was an Android app very similar to Niantic's Field Trip http://www.fieldtripper.com where you could point your smartphone at an object and learn all about what was there, anything from the history of building the Auckland Harbour Bridge to the Sea Scout Club adjacent to it. GeoVector were o course pioneers in the viewing of Americas Cup with Virtual Spectator. It's hard to be a futurist, but the exciting thing is that the gap from the time that many of us come up with ideas to the time they become a commercial reality is getting shorter.

What this will do, as has been the case with many other concepts is it will spawn hundreds of new location based games, interactive advertising events using Augmented Reality, tourist walks with information about the surroundings and more.

I'm not sure how to prevent people hurting themselves, given it is perfectly legal and will result in many positive experiences. Probably the most important thing, something Niantic has committed to, is reducing the battery drain, because that means more people will use the option of seeing through your mobile's camera, to identify potential read world obstacles instead of turning it off.
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Munich shooting: Police operation underway, at least 6 dead

Munich shooting: Police operation underway, at least 6 dead | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Gunfire rang out at a shopping mall in the German city of Munich on Friday evening, leaving several people dead and others wounded, CNN affiliate NTV reported.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
The closest I've been to Munich is frequent changes of airline at the airport but that's obviously as risky as anywhere in the city these days. The fear being created by terrorists is becoming greater and despite the candle and flower vigils and rhetoric about being stronger through adversity, fear must be creeping into the hearts of most Europeans, especially given that these 'people' don't care whether they murder innocent women, children, they are indiscriminate so to speak.

What can you do to protect yourself? I don't think anyone can give that advice, you get become dead by playing dead, you can run or hide. I think I'd go for the hide if there was somewhere I could lock myself away, by presenting less of a target. It's hard to hide in a crowd though.

Given that these people either operate in cells or are sometimes just people with anger about something and have nothing tangible to do with terrorist organizations at all, it makes it very difficult to catch them. For every person that wants to kill, there is another one waiting, at least those that are caught will stop those individuals from doing it again.

For that reason, I'm keen for apps like Facebook Live to have their own instant record button, without having to open up Facebook or another app first, looking for the option and then running it. Most people closest to the situation are not likely to have the presence of mind to start paging through the cards of an app. Fight or flight is the only natural instinct in this situation.

However, an emergency only app like a 999 phone call could video the situation whilst sending out the geospatial coordinates of the phone could hep identify and apprehend these people. The best time to start recording is the instant it happens, every minute could save lives. This could be trained into people in the same way as we have been trained in how to deal with fires and earthquakes, tempered with the first thing in every emergency protocol which is the number one thing you have to do is try to make yourself safe first..

It could also be used to warn other people to avoid the area. I appreciate it could be abused and might require moderation, but I'm sure there are intelligence tools that can help cull some of the crank users from real ones. Every time there is an event like this, we now see the news channels using video from mobile phones. This is good in the absence of other systems, but really just serves to add to the frenzy and whist journalists and editors love the ease of getting coverage from the theater, wouldn't it be more useful in the hands of Police asap?

So how about it Facebook, Apple and Google? How about an emergency live broadcasting video smartphone app that can be easily triggered, but not by accident, that can be shared with Police and emergency services in a hurry. The concept is already being used by breakdown services, my Automobile Association app lets me take photos and used the GPS assisted location information to let them know where I am with remarkable accuracy.

At the moment it feels like these videos are the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff and by the time the videos get n the hands of authorities, the time and resources to track the perpetrators down is exponential and the likelihood of catching them diminishes by the minute. 

Isn't it a no brainer?
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Local GPS mix up brings drivers to dead end

Local GPS mix up brings drivers to dead end | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A GPS mix-up with the Spokane Social Security office has been causing problems for residents in the neighborhood.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I rest my case (see previous blogs). So many people just blame the GPS system, but don't tell the GPS supplier that there is an error on their map.

So for 2 years locals in Spokane had people turn up on the wrong side of the railway track, unable to get to the Social Security Office. Locals quoted anything from 5 to 20 people turning up a day hurling epithets at their device. That's a lot of people over 2 years. That's a lot of epithet!.

Isn't it interesting that so many people out of frustration go to the news media as they did in this case. So along comes KREM2 a local TV station who confirmed the problem, used the tools provided by Apple, TomTom and MapQuest to report problems with map data.

The response time varied, but the end result is the map data has been corrected and frustrated people are no longer venting at their phones or navigation devices and I suspect that the atmosphere in the Social Security office is also a little more relaxed.

In most parts GIS people in councils (the ones that make sure changes to roads, new roads etc end up on public map data) do an awesome job. Map companies then subscribe to that data and update their maps. That used to happen annually, then monthly and now some GPS navigation brands are aiming towards 24 hour turn around.

No matter how well intentioned, not every change is going to magically appear on your car navigation system, but most quality brands have made it easy to let them know. They then need to verify that you are telling the truth and not a summer vacation student who is bored and is looking for some cheeky entertainment. They will probably be too busy playing Pokemon Go now.

Verification may involve using services like Fiverr which will pay locals a small sum of money to go to a location and take a few photos and confirm the situation, it might be talking to council or using aerial photography or the likes of Google Street View.

Once they are satisfied, the correction can appear on your map. In the case of services using offline maps (i.e. where you are not downloading map tiles as you drive), that still requires that you also update your GPS device or software. You would be amazed at how many people never do that even if it comes with lifetime free map updates.

It's a bit like looking for real time traffic or travel information. Most people don't look for it until they are already on the road when it might be too late.

So here's how you can help. Next time you spot an error, send an update to your map supplier. With most nav units or apps, you can do it from right there inside the app. If your GPS nav device requires that you have to take an action to update your map data so that it is current, do it regularly, perhaps once a quarter and it will save you a lot of stress wen you least need it.
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Mine rescue teams pull teenagers from cave after they get stuck hunting for Pokemon

Mine rescue teams pull teenagers from cave after they get stuck hunting for Pokemon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Specialist mine rescue teams were scrambled after four teenagers got lost in a cave while hunting for Poké
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had only just completed my last blog about risks and dangers to Pokemon players such as getting lured into dangerous situations or having accidents whilst paying the game when this story popped up on my Pokemon radar.

1. Kids followed Pokemon characters into a mine in Wiltshire and got lost underground.

2. A boy in London who was suspected to be playing Pokemon ran out between two buses and got bowled by a motorcycle instead of bowling down an Pokemon.

3/ British Rail put out a warning about playing Pokemon near railway tracks as Pokemon characters will randomly pop up anywhere.

4. 11 Youngsters were lured to a location in Missouri and robbed, thinking they had found a great place to replenish in-game supplies and there are now fears that pedophiles will use the game to lure children into remote areas.

Given that I frequently find stories of adults who drive into canals and rivers, or the wrong way up one way streets, claiming #TheGPSMadeMeDoIt there is a high likelihood of children making poor decisions and getting themselves into trouble.

Don't get me wrong, I am not a nay-Sayer. I committed a year of my life to an Augmented Reality startup and have been promoting location based services and games for over 10 years. I'm just saying, let's be safe out there.
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GPS Guides ‘Em Wrong, Rio Woman Says

GPS Guides ‘Em Wrong, Rio Woman Says | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Geraldine Kirk of this community is convinced GPS (global positioning system) devices, widely used in vehicles, are steering drivers the wrong way on Old Rio Grande Avenue (C.R. 634).
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's not that hard if you think about it. The major brands of car navigation not only have features within the nav itself to report changes, but they are keen to hear from customers when there are errors. The good ones also subscribe to road changes from road transport authorities such as councils.

If you find an error, tell someone. The major brands like TomTom, Navman, Garmin and map suppliers like Google encourage it. It's not hard.

There are two significant problems here:

1. The navigation device is a driver aid. The person behind the wheel drives the car and the should be looking at the signs, just as they should be looking for any other obstacles on the road. In this case, any more signs and there would be no room fr the trees. #Thenavmademedoit is not an excuse. Most nav units have a splash screen that says that they are just an aid and to obey street signs and laws.

2. A very high percentage of navigation users rarely update their maps. There is every likelihood that if you were to look at new maps, they would be aware of the changes and users would get the right instructions.

If the Middle Township Police are issuing that many tickets, then the stick isn't working. For the time it took to do that, for the time the freeholders meeting took and for the time taken for the Cape May County Herald to write this story, they could have made contact with the major navigation brands.

It took me 3 seconds to go onto Google and typ in TomTom Map Corrections. Try it yourself. This link will take you to the search results http://bit.ly/29KpH3R. It doesn't get any easier than that.

Just to prove that wasn't just good luck with one brand, I invested another 3 seconds and entered Garmin Map Corrections and got http://bit.ly/29P7MJx.

It's not rocket science folks. These brands want to help, but they are not reading your news stories, they are busy updating their maps. So how about it, good people of Rio Grande. Do you want to keep getting tickets or risk having crashes, or can someone spare half an hour to tell the GPS Navigation map companies that something has changed?

As to Al Campbell of the Cape May County Herald, how about doing some research on how often people update their car navigation maps? The irony is that most devices these days come with lifetime free map updates, so all consumers have to do is connect their device to their computer (in most cases) and they will get the corrections for free.

Maybe you could contact the map companies yourself Al and write a story about the experience and how you solved the problem that the Police, the County Road Supervisor and the South Jersey Freeholders couldn't. Now that would put a feather in your cap.
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Death and crime in Pokémon Go

Death and crime in Pokémon Go | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Gamers trying to “catch ‘em all” in the hot new Pokémon smartphone app are catching hell instead, as players are being lead into ambushes by robbers and even to the locations of dead bodies.

Pokémon Go, which launched last Wednesday, has proved so popular that it has rocketed to the top of the Apple Store and helped boost the stock of its maker, Nintendo, by 10 percent.

But the game — which leads players on a real-word scavenger hunt in which they can view Pokemon characters in virtual reality through their phone’s cameras — is causing some users to find trouble.

In Wyoming, the update of the popular 90s gaming franchise caused a teen player to follow the directions on her phone to a river, where she stumbled on a dead body.

“I was walking towards the bridge along the shore when I saw something in the water. I had to take a second look and I realized it was a body,” Shayla Wiggins told KTVQ, adding that she cried for about an hour.

In Missouri, a group of armed robbers lured eight players to one of the game’s Pokestops — which is a spot in the real world that shows up on the GPS on the players’ phones that gives them items to catch characters.





“Using the geolocation feature of the ‘Pokemon Go’ app, the robbers were able to anticipate the location and level of seclusion of unwitting victims,” Sgt. Bill Stringer of the O’Fallon Police Department said in a statement to Buzzfeed.

A Reddit user noticed there was a trove of Pokéstops in a local cemetery.

“All of the graves are Pokestops,” the user TheBatInTheBirdcage wrote on the Pokémon Go subreddit with a photo of the blue floating cubes.

While there haven’t been any deaths or crimes related to Pokémon Go in the Big Apple, many residents credited the game, which was created by Niantic and the Pokémon Company, with making them more social and helping them explore the city.

“Never in the 20 years I’ve lived in NYC have I had a conversation with a stranger on the train. Pokemon Go is powerful,” @SkywardWing tweeted.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Once again a concept that has been festering for many years since the successes of La Mosca in the streets of Europe where Nokia clutching cops and robbers chased each other gaining power ups and dropping GPS bombs. I met the guys from La Mosca in Amsterdam in 2007 and seriously considering taking up a franchise for New Zealand and Australia. Part of the concept of The Chase was to get people to explore cities and provide entertainment for locals and for tourists. http://www.eurisy.org/good-practice-la-mosca-come-out-and-play-outdoor-games-using-satellite-navigation_115

One of the concepts of La Mosca is to help cities come alive and encourage certain behaviors by gamifying them. This can apply to getting them to use public transport and local amenities, seeing locations they hadn't been to before, visiting cultural and heritage locations and generally helping urban communities thrive.

Most players of Pokemon will never even have heard of the NYC Pac-Man games played over 10 years ago http://nyti.ms/29C3jsc. This actually had similar outcomes in some cases where people freaked out when they thought they were being chased by games players.

There are risks and its good that they are coming out early. The concept of gangs using lures to bait players to go to a certain location is very real and I feel that news media and Nintendo themselves should consider warning players about personal safety as this new craze goes wild.

Another obvious risk is people playing while they are driving and the obvious distraction his causes. I would.  love to see the terms and conditions and the splash screen with an agreement by the user that they will not play the game whilst in a motor vehicle.

Because the game uses Points of Interest from Google, Nintendo have no control over where the key locations are, but they can help protect the players and have an ethical and moral obligation to do so.

This is not a situation you can regulate because now that we have a critical mass of smartphones, this will just be the first of many similar games. Opponents of people sitting in their rooms for hours playing video games should be happy that games like this encourage exercise and collaboration, but it needs to be tempered with safety warnings, or we will see everything from cars driving into pedestrians who don't see them coming to people walking into obstacles and falling off steps and injuring themselves.

Having said that, we have now entered a new era in mobile phone use with GPS which will spawn new industries, especially power packs for batteries that will go flat in a hurry.

This is a great opportunity for government, public transport and destinations to experiment for free. Want people to catch your buses and trains? Put lures on them. Want them to visit the museum or an ice cream parlor, you now have a great mechanism to do this. Create you own games and create loyalty to your brands.

Of course this is also a great opportunity for partnerships between transport and sporting franchises, between shopping malls and movie companies. I've got $10 that says within a year there will be a new Pokemon movie and every theater that plays it will be a Pokemon Super Gym.

Who would have thought this would happen? Hundreds of people I know did, we were just too early in our thinking.

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Trapped teen uses phone GPS to escape would-be rapist

Trapped teen uses phone GPS to escape would-be rapist | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A teen on vacation was able to lock herself in the bathroom and call police for help after a man tried to rape her. The only problem: she didn't know where she was.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Kudos to the Police for working out how to find the location of this woman who found herself in a dangerous position and were able to talk her through how to identify her location, so that they could find and locate her.

On TV shows they make it look so easy, a quick triangulation of a phone and hey presto, they bad guys are on level 5 of Acme Corporation Building. Unfortunately it doesn't work like that, at least not easily and in a situation like this time is of the essence.

Credit to the woman herself too, who had the presence of mind to go to a safe room, call them and to follow technical instructions. If you have location services activated on your smartphone there are lots of ways that you can identify your location, but you need to know how to use them before you find yourself in trouble. 

There are lots of free apps available and I recommend everyone use one. A great one in New Zealand is the AA Roadservice App available for Apple and Android devices. It lets you contact them if you have an accident or a breakdown and one of the key things it does is locate you using the GPS on your phone and automatically shares that with their call centre. This means they can get to you in a hurry.

Here's a link to a search that will find you some of the hundreds of apps http://bit.ly/29FiCCd. Another option is just to look on your app store on your phone.

The simplest option is use the camera on your mobile (and make sure location services are turned on). Your location is stored within the image and the image itself might help with evidence as well. Make sure you know how to take photos in a hurry. Most phones these days will let you take photos without having to enter your password or log onto your phone. You can then send the photo to someone who can help you.

Whether your car breaks down on a country road or you wander off the track on a bush walk and injure yourself. A simple preparation of knowing how to use this technology is a great investment of a few minutes of your time. It could save your life.
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'Pokemon Go' Servers Still Down; Gamers Experiencing Log-In Issues, GPS Location Errors, Authentication Problems And A Ton Of Other Bugs

'Pokemon Go' Servers Still Down; Gamers Experiencing Log-In Issues, GPS Location Errors, Authentication Problems And A Ton Of Other Bugs | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Nintendo's 'Pokemon Go' is a big disappointment to fans. Unfortunately, the Pokemon game the world was waiting for is not the game Nintendo released.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Some might see this as a fail, I see this as evidence that there is overwhelming interest in location based games. Since Ingress and localised games there just hasn't been anything mobile GPS based for gamers to play.

I took a walk today with my 7 year old granddaughter and we quickly made it to level 4 despite having to wait for the server a few times and having to reload a few times when the app froze.

As we drove home, I saw lots of teenagers along the beaches of Auckland pointing their phones, laughing and getting some exercise and I'm assuming that they were playing the new location based game,

According to my phone I exceeded my minimum exercise level of 6,000 steps and had some quality time doing it. This is going to go ballistic IMHO because it is really simple. There's every likelihood that it will gross more money than the movie.

As to the servers, I would personally just have started with New Zealand and Australia, ironed out a few bugs ad added servers as they got ironed out. We are mass early adopters and a great place to start out. As to the "big disappointment", if the nay-sayers saw the smiling faces I saw out and about today, they'd be out buying stock instead of being critical. All new systems have teething problems.

This is no fail, it is the start of an epic success, it will be bigger than Farmville and healthy to boot:)
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Netherlands rolls out world-first nationwide Internet of Things network

Netherlands rolls out world-first nationwide Internet of Things network | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
South Korea recently claimed it was rolling out the world's first nationwide IoT network, but the Netherlands has beaten it to the punch.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
If you want to innovate and support new technology to encourage people to use smart devices, give them a network and let them play.

Now the Netherlands has a huge sandpit with 1.5 million devices already registered to start using it. This does introduce lots of risk, but also lots of benefits.

Baggage handling is an  example of one of the user groups. How does that resonate with you? Do you know any frequent flyers who haven't at least once, either had to hunt down their luggage or found it has arrived, but at a different destination.

This network will drive significant innovation for everything from home security through to vehicular traffic management on the complex Dutch transport network which not only has a huge land component, but also a well used canal and river transport infrastructure.

Lots of countries talk about supporting the IoT and other innovative, disruptive technologies, but allowing them to be integrated is a significant step and I can only congratulate The Netherlands for making it happen.

Through this infrastructure I can envisage phenomenal improvements in integration of disparate technologies and advances we wouldn't have expected where unrelated technologies can come together to deliver experiences we haven't even thought of.

Netherlands clearly wants to return to the heady days when the Evoluon in Eindhoven rivaled any part of the world for innovation; Where as a little kid I used a videophone, long before mobile phones existed.

Other countries should watch this space closely. I believe there is a new renaissance on the way, enriching the lives of consumers in so many ways. When you look for trends to be set in the near future, make sure you are looking in the right direction. That's assuming you're going to wait and watch them do it rather than join the evolution.
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Drones are so done: U.S. military looking at self-driving tanks?

Drones are so done: U.S. military looking at self-driving tanks? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Autonomous vehicles have already shown their worth in consumer and enterprise markets, and the military might be the next sector to see its worth.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Car-2-X, V2V, Volvo to Volvo....I hope they get some standards sorted soon. It seems a lot of manufacturers are following the same process as the IoT market. I don't want an automated house where I have to have a different app to control the lighting from the heating, from the  security system and I may even have to determine the brand and model of phone to control them. What happens when they become obsolete lie the VW Golf that had a socket for an iPhone 4!

Of course in the military world they do have to make the systems as secure as possible in order to ensure that military vehicles aren't able to be turned on themselves and that missions can be changed or aborted based on circumstance.

I would like to think that with the expense of technologies from developers such as  TARDEC and DARPA that terrorist organizations couldn't afford them.  This technology in the theater could potentially save large numbers of lives, oxymoronic as that may seem.
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Can Facebook recommend friends just on you phone's GPS?

Can Facebook recommend friends just on you phone's GPS? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Reports have emerged that the Californian social media giant is using people's phone data (pictured) to suggest new friends which have no other connection to them.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Pick your friends and be savvy about the technology you are using.

It's interesting to see this type of story in an age where we have all sorts of privacy laws about who you can approach with direct marketing; and being clear on what their information will or won't be used for. Yet social media giants seem to be able to act with impunity where people agree to the small print which is so long that they typically don't read it.

Many of us agree that we are happy to sacrifice a degree of privacy for convenience. I want the DIY to know that I am a prospect for their weed-eater stock problem, because I bought a lawn mower from them. I'm happy to give them permission to make me an offer because I am within a couple of miles of the store.

I am not so happy about a social media giant suggesting that I might want to meet a stranger, who knows someone I know based on that fact and our proximity to each other in location.

At the #NZSOMO conference last week, a common thread was that although many delegates and presenters use Facebook to market services and information, most of limit the number of 'friends' we personally have on the application and mostly use it for friends and family, not for business networking or communicating with strangers.

Recommending friends is fine. Once we got over scarcity marketing (remember when you had to ask a friend to give you access to a Google account?) recommending people you might know based on mutual friends and family is cool. I'm not so sure recommending people based on more tenuous links combined with location is.

Its one thing if I check in, say at a concert, to be told which of my friends are also there; it's something totally different to tell me that I might want to make friends with a total stranger because we both like music and share an acquaintance and are at the same event, especially if I haven't checked in or made any attempt to let Facebook know I am there.

What do you think? Is it cool or intrusive or perhaps even dangerous?


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Cash-Strapped Towns Are Un-Paving Roads They Can’t Afford to Fix

Cash-Strapped Towns Are Un-Paving Roads They Can’t Afford to Fix | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Rural areas all over the country are embracing this kind of strategic retreat.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I had a discussion with some colleagues the other day about how traffic congestion wasn't a problem when we had plenty of unoccupied land in Auckland. Now we no longer have that luxury and we are looking at informing our customers of when and where the best times or modes of travel are.

We also noted that there are places in the world, like the USA, where there is still a huge amount of land that is basically unused. On my road trips around the USA, it is clear that freeways bypass towns and they get smaller and frequently go broke because the traffic stops coming through. Think Route 66, you could do the whole trip and hardly drive through or see a single town. Driving from New Orleans to Memphis it was sometimes hard to even work out where small towns were that we could stop at. One sign which we though would be a country town or off-freeway shopping centre that sounded interesting when we needed some food and a rest stop ended up leading straight to the Tennessee State Penitentiary, but that's another story.

It is interesting though that on one side of the world we are trying to educate customers to change their working habits, commute times and to use public transport and on another they are ripping up roads. Of course the cities still have the same problems ours do here and generations of habit take time to break.

It would be great if we could get young people (not retirees) to go back to the country and reinvigorate some of the smaller towns. With good telecommunications you can communicate with the world and a lot of people don't need to work from an office. This is starting to happen a little bit in Auckland, but city dwellers tend to start by going to smaller cities which get bigger and more expensive, leading to the same fate. Younger people might suffer from agoraphobia if they go to the really small towns and in fact a lot of the urban growth comes from youth who can't wait to leave them.

Perhaps these small cash strapped  towns need to develop hubs and encourage smart people to move there, earn good money and pay the rates that help councils maintain their roads and services and end up with a wonderful lifestyle.

Chattanooga was  a good example of a place I visited where the Chamber of Commerce set up innovation hubs and attracted good keen minds to their town. They are now suffering a shortage of workers. For example there are 721 current vacancies under the heading of Business Development. I don't think they will be un-paving any roads soon.
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Nintendo admits it's not making much money off 'Pokémon Go', loses $6.7 billion in market value

Nintendo admits it's not making much money off 'Pokémon Go', loses $6.7 billion in market value | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Nintendo, Niantic, it's all the same, right? Err...no, it's not.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So did they expect everyone to buy coins or other merchandise straight away? So here's the question. Are the investors fickle and wanted instant mass purchases inside the app in the first week and if that's not the case they think its a fail?

Here's another question, If Zynga can make loads of money selling merch on a game like Farmville, why wouldn't Nintendo be able to do the same?

What's the biggest difference between Farmville, Candy Crush and hundreds of other games that make pretty big money? They actively engage people's 'friends'. This is something that Nintendo hinted was coming. IMHO it needs to come very quickly. Let people know where their friends are, let them share Pokemon or resources, let them create Gym hangouts, come up with special deals (paid) where if you get say 5 of your friends to buy at the same time and you get extra points or special merch (not a discount) or a unique Pokemon.

So far Nintendo appear to have got the launch right and perhaps they are struggling with the mix of maturing the product in existing countries vs launching in others.

Probably the hardest thing in Japan is flexibility and the ability to pivot. I remember making a rush trip to Hamura in Japan, home of Casio's R&D to get them to strengthen a product on the basis of customer perception, due to sabotage by a disgruntled employee of a company. There was nothing wrong with the product, but there was now a perception that there was and they needed to be seen to do something.

Their initial response to me was "find better customers". I pointed out that this was a niche product and could be a hero product if I successfully got the sale of a few thousand of these products, which wholesaled for around $2,500 each.

Long story short, they agreed, we got the sale and they sold hundreds of thousands more units as a consequence of the endorsement of my world respected customer.

I hope that Nintendo's people are more commercial and  agile. Why? Because the success or failure of Pokemon Go will influence the opportunity for the Augmented Reality industry to take off on schedule as per Gartner's Hype Cycle and I have so many ideas (which I've had for a long time BTW) that have been waiting for AR to become mass market to the point that people don't know what AR is, they just do cool stuff on their smartphone.

If you know anyone in Nintendo, tell them to respond to shareholders by adding features to the game that will entice people to spend money in it.
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GPS, Mobile Technology to help Rabies control in Odisha capital, 100 Children die per day!

GPS, Mobile Technology to help Rabies control in Odisha capital, 100 Children die per day! | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Report by Odisha Diary bureau, Bhubaneswar: If things are on right track, an innovative proposal given by Mission Rabies, the dog
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Did you know 100 children die every day from rabies? That blew me away.

What a great use of GPS, although it sounds like a gargantuan mission and very expensive. With a lot of these dogs being wild its obviously not something they can put on pet owners to take responsibility for.
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What the fatal Tesla Autopilot crash means for driverless cars

What the fatal Tesla Autopilot crash means for driverless cars | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Tesla Autopilot is beta software, but are drivers treating it as such?
Luigi Cappel's insight:
So what exactly does autopilot mean. I've been on the jump seat on the  flight deck of aircraft several times when they are on autopilot. The crew keep an eye out and are ready to act, but they also might be having a coffee, a meal or turning around for a chat. They can do so safely and it is normal practice. Some captains might tell you that it is a safer and more comfortable flight.

There is one significant difference and that is there are no other planes within a potentially dangerous distance and as soon as something does come into their airspace, or there are environmental changes, the pilot is alerted and takes back control. The biggest difference is that they have time to take back control of the aircraft.

Now come back to the Tesla and various types of driverless or autonomous cars that share the road with a ton of other vehicles 'manned by drivers of various degrees of skill. Remember the pilot has trained for years before he is allowed to fly a commercial airliner. The person in the car next to you might not even have a license!

Let's look a bit closer at those people and compare their behaviour to the rigor of a commercial pilot. Half of them wouldn't pass a road test, whereas a commercial pilot has to constantly re-qualify their ratings for each type of plane they command and that includes simulations of events that are tough and realistic enough to come out of a SIM , vomiting and emotionally shaken, so that they know how to deal with a situation if it really occurs.

One of the issues I have discussed in the past is visibility. In this story they talk about the color match between the truck trailer the Tesla hit and the car itself. It was difficult to distinguish.

In the street furntiure data capture exercise I was involved with, on bad weather days or under intense low ambient light that Auckland commuters face every sunny day, it is very difficult frequently to see much of anything including speed restriction and others signs. Then on bad weather days like twilight in the rain we have to deal with things like ghost markings, where old lane markings can be difficult to distinguish from the new markings. They can be meters apart.

How about other humans that want to interfere, like boy racers https://thefuturediaries.com/2013/04/19/boy-racers-make-sport-with-driverless-cars/. I drive a Corvette and frequently have young drivers wanting to bait me or show me how fast their Mazda Familia is. I choose to ignore them, but I have the ability to not only react to their frequently irrational behaviour, but also to their faces or gestures, something a LiDAR system can't do.

I heard a comment yesterday from someone quoting a driver who is big on Pokemon Go. He said "There was a Pokemon on the Auckland Harbour Bridge and I had to really slow down to get it." That in itself is scary as hell, especially with the high winds and harsh weather conditions we have had recently, but more importantly, how will a driverless car cope with other vehicles individually or in groups, like the story above. That sort of behavior "does not compute"

It is interesting to read in the linked story that Tesla's car is in fact a 'Level 2' and as such they expect the driver to keep his hands on the steering wheel and if they don't, an audible alarm will sound. In effect it is not yet a driverless car, it is a car that assists the driver.

This is interesting when I hear about the fact that a Tesla drove itself over the Harbour Bridge some months ago. Check out this link to the story from the NZ Herald http://bit.ly/29QpwC8. Apparently the driver had his arms folded. He therefore did not comply with Tesla's regulations unless that car was more sophisticated than the current models.

Now put yourself in the 'drivers seat' of this car, if you could afford one and imagine showing it off to your friends, which of course you would do if you had one. Would you be demonstrating your driverless car with your hands on the steering wheel?

Once again, don't get me wrong, I'm all for driverless vehicles when they are ready, safe and suitable for our road network and can operate safely next to all the people who run red lights, don't indicate last second lane changes on motorways, are distracted by playing Pokemon Go or sending messages on their phone. I love the idea of distributed ownership and other concepts that will come from this. I just wonder if we are being a little hoodwinked by manufacturers who are looking to generate huge profits from their designs now, not in 10 years time.

Remember the jokes of what if Microsoft designed a car? Here is one of Bill Gate's own stories http://bit.ly/29RJXh0. Well guess what? Brands like Google are now doing exactly that. Are you ready for this? Would you buy one today?
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An Animal Shelter Is Letting Pokémon Go Fanatics Volunteer To Walk Dogs

An Animal Shelter Is Letting Pokémon Go Fanatics Volunteer To Walk Dogs | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
You can walk around aimlessly with
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I recently posted about Pokemon being an opportunity to drive business to destinations like bars and attractions. http://sco.lt/5QPpzN

Here's a really cool twist. An animal shelter needs people to help exercise their dogs. So they have targeted Pokemon players as potential dog walkers. What great thinking! Now we have people turning up wanting to take the dogs out, the dogs get exercise and some human bonding and everyone wins. Who knows, some of them mike even give a homeless dog a home.

This isn't just a game unless you let it be. Besides using it as a game based pedometer as you walk to incubate eggs, what other good things could you do with it?
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Pokemon Go players go mad as rare Pokemon appears in park

Pokemon Go players go mad as rare Pokemon appears in park | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Bizarre footage shows hundreds of frenzied-looking people gathered at a park in downtown Washington in order to catch a rare Pokemon.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Of course they aren't telling the full story, there were Pokemon events organized all over the countries where it has been released. Large gatherings of people did not randomly appear in parks and other locations. Numbers of people in the thousands were predicted in some locations.

Nevertheless Niantic  is doing an a tremendous job in marketing this game and by combining supply and demand, location and gamification, they are creating an unprecedented interest and participation in mobile AR gaming.

This should be particularly pleasing to people who complain about people glued to their chairs messaging each other from across the room.

I would repeat my previous warnings about watching where you go. Given that cyber criminals or even terrorists could use Pokemon lures to get people to go go unsafe locations where they might want to prey on innocent players. This is particularly an issue now that there are a host of Google based web sites such as www.pokecrew.com that share the location of Pokemon on a map.

Gotta Catch'em All http://bit.ly/29MrFRd is an example of web pages I expect to see all over the world as Pokemon is slowly released using Apple marketing 101 around the world.

Bottom line, have fun, but use common sense and be a little wary of the locations you go to.
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How GIS and GPS is revolutionizing crime tracking and personal safety

How GIS and GPS is revolutionizing crime tracking and personal safety | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
With the memory of the Dallas and Orlando shootings still fresh in our minds, many of us have been asking what we can do to feel, and be, safer on the streets in our daily lives. Our fear is very real, but luckily, so are the opportunities to address and overcome it, with GIS and GPS systems
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was watching a story on CNN news last night about the shootings in the USA, such as Philando Castile and learned that there is an organization in Baton Rouge called Stop The Killing Inc that listens to Police scanners and goes to potential crime scenes.

They were the ones who filmed the killing of Alton Sterling, although they said that they thought it was going to be an assault rather than the disaster it turned into.

When I first visited New York back around 1990 I was given a map by the hotel concierge. He shaded parts of Manhattan and said, "don't go to any of these places after dark". I had plans of visiting the Cotton Club and other famous music venues, but was told that no cabs would be prepared to pick me up in the middle of the night.

When I traveled through Mississippi a few years ago there were places I avoided because of high crash rates and I was still getting used to driving on the wrong side of the road again; and Murphy's :aw dictating that every time we arrived in a city it was rush hour, i.e. the busiest time of day.

Tools like RedZone will not only make it easier to avoid dangerous locations, but also to report incidents. I installed it myself and obviously it hasn't made it's way to New Zealand yet. It also runs very slowly on my iPad 2, so I might have to wait a while before I can use it, or perhaps when the Android version comes out and I can use it on my more modern Samsung Galaxy 6. Have you used it?
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Transmission and GPS issues plague Haas’ race - FormulaSpy

Transmission and GPS issues plague Haas’ race - FormulaSpy | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
British Grand Prix - The Haas F1 team suffered from transmission and power outage issues in a race that has been labelled as their 'toughest day'.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
What do you think? Are we going too far away from real sport? Remember back in the day when drivers used to walk the track, looking for potholes, greasy surfaces or other obstacles?

Now they have a bad day when the GPS fails and they can't locate the exact position of the driver.

It seems like on one side of the scale we deride people for using substances to improve their performance and on the other side of the scale we are becoming so dependent on non car technology to help drivers win races.

I see us going into multiple streams in future. Back to purist sport for some, where the best person wins on one side and on the other side, the Enhanced Human World Champs are gettng closer and closer https://thefuturediaries.com/2012/10/30/enhanced-human-world-champs/ i
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Where you can and can't drink tap water in Europe

Where you can and can't drink tap water in Europe | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A new infographic has revealed the different destinations where tap water is safe to drink. While tap water is fine in the Czech Republic, you should buy bottled water in Slovakia.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a great example of a useful map. I'm heading off to Samoa for a holiday next month and one of the first things we thought about was water. The recommendations are to drink bottled water there. Just as well the raw fish tends to be served in coconut milk!

We frequently read advisories that say only drink bottled water. As the article says basically brushing your teeth, eating lettuce that has been washed in water (believe it or not I've had a stomach infection from lettuce and I've had Bali Belly, they are not the greatest ways to enjoy a holiday.

The thing I like about maps is that they are much more friendly than reading through a list. A lot of people who visit Europe for business or pleasure will find themselves on both sides of this map.

What information would be useful to you on a map?
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Siemens gets creative with new startup unit

Siemens gets creative with new startup unit | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
German conglomerate Siemens announced a new standalone startup unit dedicated to foster disruptive ideas and accelerate new technologies.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is really cool, I love the idea of block chain energy trading. I find it so frustrating that power companies have the ability to inhibit people from investing in solar power where they will only pay a pittance for excess power or feed-in tariffs.

It would be awesome if there was a way that we could use disruption to force the industry to make it attractive for communities to share electricity. It makes huge sense for the country because it reduces the investment need for tax funded electricity generation and of course solar power is clean.

It could also create a financial mechanism for people to collaborate on charging electric vehicles. Imagine if I was to do deals with my neighbors at home or work, using excess solar energy in an equitable trading scheme to charge electric vehicles with energy that otherwise might be wasted.

It seems to me that this would increase resilience on the grid and save taxpayers money. The only losers would be the greedy power companies. I can just hear them bleating about how unfair it is if a disruptive business model takes revenue from them.

Think of other industries currently complaining about disruptive models that they could have owned themselves if they took a slight,y longer term view on profit. 
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Garmin DriveSmart GPS ups the ante or do they?

Garmin DriveSmart GPS ups the ante or do they? | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Pricey device is capable of turning a no-frills econobox into a highway queen
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Are they doing enough? My 3 year old TomTom is sitting in the boot of my second car. I typically use mobile apps like Google Drive and HERE (both of which include  real time traffic and HERE includes speed zones). I suspect that Google is ahead when it comes to Points of Interest POI) because they also include phone numbers, a street view image of the destination and will even tell you if they should still be open when you get there.

Helping me place calls, send and receive text messages are not things I like to do when driving and my Samsung Galaxy S6 is really smart. I have a Navdy on order which is a Heads Up Display and  allows hand gesture control of your phone. Unfortunately at the time I ordered the Navdy I thought I'd never own a car with a HUD, but now I do. I will probably only use the gesture technology for fun, when stationary.

So the Garmin now tells you to turn left at McDonalds (great if McDonalds is still there and hasn't closed or moved to a new site). This is something they and Navman (both owned by the same parent company) said they would do a few years ago, so it's good to read that it has arrived.

Alerts about sharp corners  are good, but most places I go have street signs that are adequate and you shouldn't be going so fast you can't see them in time. The Interface to Foursquare is a good idea. Foursquare saved me from getting lost in Nowhereville Louisiana when my TomTom couldn't find a popular alligator farm for me and the roads were getting narrower and the farms farther apart.

So the only thing left for me is that the Garmin will have a bigger battery than my phone and the navigation wouldn't mean that I have a very low phone battery when I arrive at my destination.

I wonder if PND brands have left their run too late and are about to become another victim of technology disruption. As to in-car navigation, I still like good systems with real time traffic and regular updates. My $6,000 Siemens VDO System was great when it was new, but they stopped producing maps 4 years ago and while I'm hoping it will add $100 of value to my car when I sell it, I haven't actually used it since the map updates stopped other than an occasional check to see if it still works.
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Tesla driver killed in autopilot crash said the technology was 'great'

Tesla driver killed in autopilot crash said the technology was 'great' | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Tesla driver killed in a crash while in autopilot model happened to be a proponent of autonomous driving.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is a sad but timely reminder that we not there yet and that we should not overestimate the capability of today's technology.

Not that long ago I was told a Tesla drove itself over the Auckland Harbour Bridge. The interesting thing is that as the narrative on the video attached to this story illustrates, Tesla's autopilot is just that, its not an autonomous vehicle, although it is a stepping stone in that direction. It expects the driver to be in a position to take over when needed.

In this case the car computer didn't recognise the danger and therefore didn't take action of any kind including alerting the driver, let alone put on the brakes and a Tesla fan sadly passed away in the aftermath.

I have written many blogs on driverless cars http://bit.ly/298C5Mg and this illustrates one of the concerns I have in New Zealand particularly with ambient light.

Classic point in case in this accident where it appears that neither the driver, nor the Tesla's cameras, 'saw' the truck and trailer turning in front of it.

Auckland commuters experience long periods of sun-strike because the sun stays low on the horizon, particularly for East and Westbound commuters. Given that your eyes are very close to your brain, an alert driver's synapses don't have send a signal far to alert the driver there is danger ahead and initiate action.

Try an experiment (as a passenger) and point your phone's camera lens into the sun at that angle and see what the car computer is trying to deal with. Don't do it for too long or you will damage the camera, it doesn't like looking straight into the sun any more than you do. There has been quite a lot of research in roadside data collection that has been hampered by light conditions including reading safety and speed signs.

Whilst this is a tragic accident of the sort that frequently happens to good drivers who may be momentarily distracted, it's an ever greater risk in this sort of vehicle under the ambient light conditions we face.

I don't think we are quite as close as we think to safely being driven around in a car without a steering wheel and I also fear that early adopters may underestimate their limitations.
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Mesa company uses GPS to bust workers stealing thousands of dollars worth of insulation

A Mesa company used GPS to bust two workers stealing thousands of dollars in insulating from them.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I love these stories. #Catchingcrooks with GPS is so easy, low cost (relatively speaking) and massively reduces the costs of investigation whilst increasing convictions. What have you got that you could protect?
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