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Wearable Computers the Size of Buttons to Monitor Health - IEEE Spectrum

Wearable Computers the Size of Buttons to Monitor Health - IEEE Spectrum | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

According to an article in October in InformationWeek, “ABI Research has projected that by 2016, wearable wireless medical device sales will reach more than 100 million devices annually. The market for wearable sports and fitness-related monitoring devices is projected to grow as well, reaching 80 million device sales by 2016.”


Via Farid Mheir
Luigi Cappel's insight:

As I've been saying................This is now the age of M2M and health is a major beneficiary of this.

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Farid Mheir's curator insight, January 22, 2013 9:50 AM

With advances in wearable devices and the ubiquity of smartphones, it is essential for businesses with workers in dangerous conditions (mining, construction, etc.) to equip their teams with such devices. This may help prevent injuries but also reduce insurance premiums.

Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon

Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
I've been reading a book called 'Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do' by Tom Vanderbilt, which resonates very well with me. Now I'm no petrol head, but I still like driving my car and it is still m...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It only takes a little pain to have people hop in their cars. A wet day, having to stand on a bus, or having to stand on the side of the road and watch the bus go by. Driving is part of our culture. We are how we move. Even in cities where driving is impractical, like Tokyo, I have friends who still own a car, almost a status symbol because of the costs of even parking your car. They go driving in the weekend and enjoy the countryside.

The most popular and profitable radio time, even today when so many people are connected to their smartphones for entertainment, is drive-time. Of course this is also when we get our critical traffic reports.

We don't even want to get out of our cars. An estimated 22% of ALL restaurant meals in America are ordered through the window of a car.

I really like the footer, that a pedestrian is someone who has just parked their car.

Just last night I was reading in the news that sales of new passenger cars in New Zealand have gone up in the first months of this year by 3.6% breaking a 26 year record. Sales of commercial vehicles for the first four months in this country are up 14% on the same period last year.

Still think more people are ditching their cars?

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Britain's silliest place names

Britain's silliest place names | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

From Bottom Burn to Netherthong, a new map highlights the silliest towns and
villages in Britain

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is something you just need to go and look at. There are 10 pages of maps with some of the silliest place names you have ever heard of and they are all real.

I used to think 'only in America, but when it comes to place names , I think perhaps Britain takes the cake. Imagine coming back from a road trip and when people ask where you have been you list places like Bottom Burn, East Breast, Dickland, Shyte Brook, Thonglands, Loose Bottom, Brown Willy, Great Snoring, Frolic and Cockplay, the only redeeming factor would be that you didn't have to say you live there.

It reminds me of the guy who owned the second hand shop in Eketahuna in New Zealand who had an outrigger sailboat air freighted from the Pacific Islands and when he inquired as to why it hadn't been delivered, he was told that it had been sent back to the Islands because no such place existed. I can attest to the fact that it exists. I used to work with a colleague who was born there and I met and had coffee with the guy who bought the outrigger.

It has recently become famous because they are closing the only pub in town, which doesn't leave much for anyone. On the other hand, for those who say that you can't buy a house in New Zealand any more. There are houses in Eketahuna for sale for as little as $45,000. I'm not sure what you would do for a job, you might need to work on a farm or commute to Levin, but a 3 bedroom house for under US$30,000 or 20,000 British pounds wouldn't be too bad to retire on a pension. Don't take my word for it, check it out here http://bit.ly/1Qlxfoy.

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Accident-free zone: The German town which scrapped all traffic lights and road signs

Accident-free zone: The German town which scrapped all traffic lights and road signs | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

A small town in Germany which scrapped all its traffic lights and road signs in a bid to cut down on crashes reported yesterday that the experiment is 'a total success'.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Could it work where you live? I'd have to say in my friendly suburb of Torbay it might (in winter anyway), any further out and I would hate to be the politician or engineer that suggested it.

People who have been driving for years still don't seem to know which hand is left and which is right. Red lights apparently mean go fast so that you can beat the bastards who think they can start driving when their lights turn green.

Lots of people wonder what the stick is on the steering wheel that they accidentally push as they turn a sharp corner, but cleverly in newer cars it bounces back again after the turn has been completed.It indicates something, but don't trust it because if you watch 20 cars go in the same direction through a roundabout, I guarantee you that there will be an equal number having the right indicator on as the left one; that is if they are driving with the right hand on the steering wheel. If they are on the phone, that's probably in their right hand and they won't have to accidentally tap the lever and confuse other drivers, because the hand is nowhere near he steering wheel. They might miss their turn and have to go all the way around the roundabout a second time, further confusing people though. I mean if I watched you go past every exit, I might just assume that you were getting off at the last one. You know the rule, never assume because it makes an ass out of u and me.

Merge like a zip at on-ramps explains why so many trousers and jeans have to go to the tailor to be fixed. It's a wonder there aren't more people going to Accident and Emergency through this simple act of closing the gap, thereby getting their privates caught in the zip. It does make entertaining viewing on webcams. You can add some music as they cause the concertina effect as 30 cars slow down during the merge and towies love it too, because some of them would probably go broke if it wasn't for the nose to tails that occur during this difficult manoevre of getting onto a motorway.

Following distance is something that greenies invented, the idea is that if you follow close enough to the car in front of you, you can clean your windscreen with their water.

I was really impressed with the speed zone of 30km per hour in this study, because when I was in Germany last year, the average driver drove at 30km over the speed limit everywhere. But at least they mostly did it in the fast lane.

In New Zealand we don't have a fast lane. Here we have our own sets of rules. Take the Harbour Bridge for example, people change lanes constantly in the 80km per hour zone so they can drive at 90, but then when they get to the motorway proper, they still sit in the fast lane at 90 forcing others who want to drive at the 100km per hour target to undertake them, stay alongside long enough to show the slower driver one or two of their fingers, perhaps a demonstration of intellectual prowess; (Today was brought to you buy the number two) and then zip in front of them and cut them off to teach them a lesson about driving etiquette and consideration for others.

 

 

 

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Tube strike: Walking map shows distance between stations ahead of planned 2016 walkout

Tube strike: Walking map shows distance between stations ahead of planned 2016 walkout | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Transport for London’s ‘walk the Tube’ map shows how long it would take to
walk between stations ahead of a planned February 2016 strike

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is a great way of providing something positive out of a difficult situation. Transport For London understands that with a large number of tourists or people who only know their way around London via the Tube, or don't know their way around at all. It's the scale that people don't understand.

I can relate to that when I decided it would be an easy walk on a stonking hot day from Battery Park to Strawberry Field in Central Park NYC via Chinatown. If it wasn't the middle of summer it wouldn't have been a big deal, but I had no idea at all of the scale. I was pretty hot and bothered by the time I finished my journey.

Anyway, if you are going to get caught out by the Tube strike, the map from Transport For London will give you a good idea of what is realistic. 10 out of 10 for a transport authority to try to take some of the pain out of the situation for their customers.

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The Clever Way Ford’s Self-Driving Cars Navigate in Snow

The Clever Way Ford’s Self-Driving Cars Navigate in Snow | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

There are a few tricky problems to solve before we can all let go of the wheel. One of those is how autonomous cars respond to bad weather.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

What does this mean? Is Ford going to send mapping cars around the world and create their own maps, or does it mean that ford will have driverless cars with LiDAR collecting data and sharing it with other cars through the cloud, or through V2V for local information? Will it be unique to the Ford brand? I.e. if you don't have a Ford, do you miss out?

How will they know what local speeds are, currently this is a big job in all countries because other than taking photos of speed signs, map companies need to subscribe to gazettes from each city, county, state and country;  because they change all the time.

I love the idea of a car that knows how to drive in winter because we not only have snow, but we also have black ice and besides the science that DOT's use to identify the likelihood of black ice and historic locations where it is known to occur, it is invisible.

Machine identifying, let alone reading speed signs is difficult any time and even more so in winter and ambient light makes this even more difficult in countries like New Zealand and places like Alaska.

If signs were designed to be machine readable, perhaps using technologies like beacons, Bluetooth or perhaps bar codes ( including being readable if the sign has a coating of ice over it) there might be a solution, but this would effectively mean replacing every sign in the world. That will happen in test cities, but beyond that you need a critical mass of vehicles that would use the technology in order to achieve a BCR or return on investment and that is a big ask.

Do you have a car navigation application? It doesn't matter whether it is portable, built into the car, or a Smartphone app. Does it tell you the speed zones for your region? Many don't. If it does, how often is it right?

I'm going to run a couple of polls and I'd love you to participate. You will find them at https://twitter.com/BluesBro/status/694943249354485760 and at https://twitter.com/BluesBro/status/694942706640916480. The first asks if you have car navigation with speed zones, how often is it accurate, the second asks if your car nav system actually have speed zones, or just provide you with driving directions and travel times.

Please join in for this straw poll.

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Google finally learns to talk like an Aussie

Google finally learns to talk like an Aussie | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Slang words like 'arvo', 'footy' and 'Maccas' have been added to the search engine and Google Maps vocabulary.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

How does Siri work for you? I've been trying all sorts of things on my iPhones lately and even putting on a fake American accent doesn't work as well as it used to. Multiple attempts to have it record memo's, generate reminders and schedule tasks or calendar events seem to mostly result in my mobile phoning people that I didn't have a desire to talk to. I wonder how many people, many of whom, I did not knowingly add into my contact lists have noticed missed calls from me, which I hung up on as soon as I realized my phone was calling them.

Maybe I need an Android or to start using a fake Aussie accent, or just rattle the dags in my phone to shake up the 'roos in the top paddock. Fair suck of the sav Google, I'd like to see you do that for the Kiwi language bro. I wonder which of the two countries have the most difficult place names to pronounce. Which pronunciation would you pick? Try this for size:

Whangarei is equally wongaray, fungaray, or for an American Wangarye. I wonder who those would call in my phone book.

I have noted that lately my Google Maps has also been questioning whether I want to go to certain places like my Radiation and Oncology clinic, because it is closed. You can say GIGO, but most destinations probably aren't aware that if they don't tell Google what their hours are, it could cost them business.

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Driving Is Losing Its Allure for More Americans

Driving Is Losing Its Allure for More Americans | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

America’s youth aren’t rushing out to get their drivers licenses as they once did, a trend that signals the auto industry’s new interest in car-sharing services and autonomous vehicles might be the right tack.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Perhaps what we are seeing here is a wildcard of services like Uber and Lyft which, combined with location based smartphone technologies are making it much more convenient for young people to get around, outside of their commute, than the cost of buying, servicing and paying taxes on a depreciating asset, i.e. a private car.

If that's the case, autonomous cars are going to be just as hard to sell as normal cars, unless those cars are also offered as part of a PAYD service. That is of course one of the business models for companies like Uber, even if it is counter to the culture they espouse.

A lot of young people I know are becoming regular Uber users. It matches the way they think, it's convenient, its fairly transparent and apparently just as safe as driving a taxi if the recent articles and stats about sexual abuse allegations against commercial taxi drivers are true, because it appears that services like Uber are adding a lot more opportunities to rate drivers, both manually as a customer and electronically with the introduction of apps that monitor driving behavior like harsh breaking, sudden acceleration and sudden cornering.

It is great to see the car industry looking for new ways to stay viable. I think there is a long way to go and a lot more new technology to be considered, especially for urban commuters. I do suggest that wild cards may have more impact than conventional linear thinking that hasn't changed much in the car industry over the last 100 years.

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Volvo promises ‘DEATHPROOF’ cars by 2020

Volvo promises ‘DEATHPROOF’ cars by 2020 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Swedish company, which has built its reputation on safety, says a world where nobody dies in car accidents is closer than most people think.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Volvo has always had a great reputation for safety and while they include some obvious preconditions, like they can't control stupidity of people on the road, like boy racers who deliberately try to confuse the car computers as seen in The Future Diaries at http://bit.ly/1PdHwXm,

I'm sure they can reduce crashes caused by drivers in their own cars.

Claiming they can build one of the safest cars on the market is fair.

Statistics show that fatigue and driver distraction are significant causes for car accidents. Safety systems that slow down cruise control when cars are approaching in the other direction; and vibration of the steering wheel when the car veers out of its lane could be useful, but could also cause accidents, for example where old lane markings have been replaced, but under certain conditions, such as wet roads, are still visible together with the new ones. 

-How about the driver who drove off the road onto railway tracks, because the GPS told him to? http://bit.ly/1OFryDZ What if there was no driver?

-The GPS tells a driver to do a U-Turn, so he did. http://bit.ly/1TgAHWO

-How about the driver who drove onto a pedestrian and cycle path. "The GPS made me do it." http://bit.ly/1RFJdyP

-Typing in the wrong address isn't the GPS' fault, but I doubt the new Volvo could have saved this woman. http://bit.ly/1nrIy83

-9 accidents allegedly caused by Google Maps http://bit.ly/1S1Nj51

-Sat Nav blunders cause 300,000 crashes in Britain http://bit.ly/1ZUKkiV

-A man in Alaska drove his car into the harbor because the nav told him to. http://bit.ly/1lFP2hL

-A guy in Oklahoma turned left off a bidge, following the GPS instructions and woke up in a woman's house roof, to an angry woman with a broom http://bit.ly/1KwLrJe

-They drove into the Susquehanna River because the GPS didn't know the road ended. http://bit.ly/1ng52rJ

I have more, but I think by now you have the picture. I hope the computers and data are smarter than some of the drivers. I heard a statistic they other day saying the most common cause of aircraft crashes is pilot error, I'm sure you can say the same about car accidents.

Some of the accidents above could have been avoided with proximity sensors, especially where there is an alert driver, but if the 'driver' in the Volvo is engrossed in the move which is designed to end exactly when she reaches her destination and the steering wheel starts vibrating while the movie climaxes, Volvo have made it pretty clear that they are not at fault if the real story ends in an unplanned way.

Do you have any stories on people who had a crash or unusual experience because of their GPS nav system?

 

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Why travel sickness could put the brakes on driverless cars

Why travel sickness could put the brakes on driverless cars | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Age-old problem of travel sickness threatens the hoped-for benefits of letting
a computer take the wheel in autonomous cars

Luigi Cappel's insight:

I didn't know I suffered kinetosis, at least I didn't know that's what it was called, nor did I consider this as a problem in a driverless car.

I liked the idea of being able to turn the front seats around to face the rear seat passengers, but I never considered the fact that I suffer from motion sickness if I'm not in a front seat or preferably the driver's seat.

Research from the university of Michigan predicts an increase of almost 28% of people traveling in driverless  cars suffering nausea,  dizziness and vomiting.

It might not be an issue on an interstate, but stop-starting in urban areas, or the long and winding roads in New Zealand could be a real problem. This could be compounded for those who were thinking that driverless cars mean they can have their cake and eat it too when it comes to drinking and driving. Ask a taxi driver about that demographic.

What is great is that discussions like this are happening before mass production starts so that manufacturers can start coming up with solutions before they drop their profits making a vomit comets.

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Proportional Map of the World's Largest Languages

Proportional Map of the World's Largest Languages | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

we had coWho here speaks Lahnda? Proportional Map of the World's Largest Languages https://t.co/w7Yl6PgW69 via @mental_floss

Luigi Cappel's insight:

I thought we had covered off this topic some time ago. I bogged about a Telegraph story at the end of December which provided an interactive map of the world where you can drill in and see how many languages are spoken in each country http://bit.ly/1U0VGer.

This however adds some color to the picture and blows away  misconceptions for many of us, particularly in the English speaking world. English is certainly up there with a good slice of the pie, but it's clear that the vast majority of the world doesn't speak it, certainly not as their first language.

Kind of interesting when you hear the GOP candidates talk about how the USA is the greatest, mot powerful, most influential country in the world, yet most people in the world wouldn't be able to understand the speeches if they heard them.

So despite this modern world where we have technologies, health, transport systems and much more in common, we are far from having a simple way of communicating globally without risking losing the intent in the conversation. I believe our Tower of Babel has a significant impact on tension and conflict in the world.

As an international business person in the past I have enjoyed significant success as a consequence of being at least to some degree multilingual, because studying many languages has also assisted me in understanding a little about their cultures.

Were there any surprises on this map for you? Have you even heard if every single one of these most popular languages? I haven't heard of Marathi, but then only 71 million people speak it in India:)

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Tesla Restricts Autopilot on Residential Streets

Tesla Restricts Autopilot on Residential Streets | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Tesla Motors Inc. implemented restrictions on where it will allow its vehicles to use autopilot after many owners took videos of themselves driving hands-free in dangerous situations.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is yet another very smart move on the part of Tesla, a company that keeps following up innovation after innovation. I love the way they send wireless software updates to their cars.

A few thoughts though. If autopilot only works if there is a center divider and won't operate on residential streets, I assume that doesn't include the 'summon' feature, otherwise you would never get to use it. I know a lot of people who would buy the car just for that feature. I had one of the first remote ignition starters in New Zealand and I loved using it when people leaned on the car at shopping malls or other places.

Not going more than 5 miles an hour over the speed limit is a great feature, but in this country I'm only aware of one navigation system in New Zealand, being TomTom that actually has national current speed zones (excluding road works) and many systems don't have them at all.

I'm not aware of any system in the world today that, even with good cameras, can recognise let alone read speed signs under all lighting conditions. In some countries like New Zealand and Alaska where the sun spends a lot of time very low on the horizon, even on good days, speed sign recognition is technologically challenging. If you get caught speeding, technology fail will not be a legal defense.

I was having a discussion in the office today about the fact that most of us have our car parked 95% of the time. This is where autonomous cars could come into their own. Drive to work, then let the car go home and pick up the kids and take them to school, then let other people use it for a fee 'Uber driverless car style' and then reverse the process to get everyone home and you have a car that pays for itself. That would  compensate for the higher cost of the additional technology required to build driverless cars.

Long term this means that we can actually start having designer cities with very few car parks. In the long term car parks will no longer be a profitable land investment.

Like many things I write about, driverless cars are nothing new. GM presented the concept at the 1939 World's Fair. Funny really when we talk about the rapid pace of change.

 

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The Best Map Ever Made of America’s Racial Segregation

The Best Map Ever Made of America’s Racial Segregation | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

If you follow the link at the bottom of the linked story, you can try the actual app and it's really interesting looking at places you know.

What's is most interesting is it really doesn't matter which town or city you go to, whether it's a road, a railway track or an industrial area, there seems to be pretty much a racial divide to most cities. There are some areas where there is a patchwork of color, pardon the pun, but they are certainly not the norm.

As I discussed in my eBook http://amzn.to/1jbAJB7 Buying a House Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services, people like to live in areas where people live that are 'like them'. That may relate to race, income, religious beliefs, type of work they do, it is all relevant, but going by this excellent app, race seems to be the number one card.

When you try the app, note you can turn on map labels and when you zoom in, it will take you right to street level. If you are looking at moving city or state, this might be one of many tools that might help you if you need to find accommodation in a hurry. Hopefully race itself won't be a significant factor in your decision, but this certainly demonstrates the value and power of maps.

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Volvo and Ericsson want to make life a stream in autonomous cars

Volvo and Ericsson want to make life a stream in autonomous cars | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Volvo's recently unveiled Concept 26 is its vision for the autonomous car of the future. Its "Relax Mode" would allow occupants to watch video content while the car takes care of driving.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

It's starting to feel a lot like a plane, but I'm starting to wonder, why would I own a car like this? I'd be more inclined to call an Uber if it had this functionality. It would probably be much cheaper than owning one.

If you enjoy driving, as I do, the last thing I want to do is sit in the driver's seat and watch a movie. I'd probably end up with motion sickness, but I'm sure, just like in the plane, there will be a barf bag under the steering wheel as well:)

Next thing we could have Virtual Reality on the windows, so instead of seeing your normal commute, you could be looking at someone else's in a different country, wouldn't that be fun? Share the view with your friends.

I like the safety features that Volvo and others are introducing, but not so sure about this as a reason to buy their car.

Last question, if something suddenly goes wrong and the 'driver' is engrossed in a movie and is not sufficiently alert to re-take control from the computer, whose responsibility is it?

Will it be legal for a driverless car to be empty? Can I send it back home when I get to work, so the kids can use it? Will children underage and without a license be allowed to travel in it?

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These maps show how far $50 of gas will get you

These maps show how far $50 of gas will get you | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

How to take a fabulous road trip for just $50.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is great for Americans, may you enjoy many miles of happy motoring, but for we Kiwi's the scale doesn't seem to work the same. With the price of oil coming down, Americans have gone from paying $3.50 a gallon in 1980 to less than $2 a gallon today. In New Zealand in 1981 we were paying $NZ2.70 a gallon.

So going by the same ration, we should be getting it really cheap! But no, we are now paying around $8.10 a gallon for 91 Octane.

Oil companies tell us that the price of a barrel of oil doesn't have much to do with the cost of petrol at the pump. However this Washington Post (reasonably reputable) article links the fact that oil prices are at their lowest ever is a key factor. That is true, because we pay in excess of $2.70 a gallon in petrol tax, about the same as Americans pay for their entire fuel delivered to the petrol tank of their cars. I wouldn't have thought the cost of moving oil, given it's refined locally would be much more than in the USA and I also wouldn't have thought the cost of running a gas station would be much different either.

So I wonder if someone could explain to me why, with the cost of oil being so low, in America they are paying about 40% less for their fuel per gallon than they paid in 1980 at the same time as we are paying around 300% more?

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The future of mobility: How transportation technology and social trends are creating a new business ecosystem

The future of mobility: How transportation technology and social trends are creating a new business ecosystem | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

How will advances in transportation technologies and shifts in social attitudes shape the future of mobility?

Luigi Cappel's insight:

As a futurist one of the hardest things to come to grips with, but the most important reality is that significant change takes time, a lot of time. In relation to previous eras, change happens very quickly, but it doesn't take place as quickly as we think and they are evolutionary rather than revolutionary.

If you think the fit-bit is a revolution that occurred overnight, think again. When did you first get a pedometer? I think I got my first one about 15 years ago, but it could be longer. Of course this is a simple and low cost technology. Driverless cars as a total shift has massive implications as this article points out, not only to the way we drive and the implications for what happens on the road, but also to whole industries dependent on car purchasing and ownership.

I agree that the shift to reduced car ownership is being accelerated in cities due to the emergence of wild card companies like Uber and Lyft. I also strongly agree that the shift will occur at varying rates in different countries around the world and between cities well provisioned with safe, comfortable and timely public transport, versus rural areas where motor vehicle ownership is essential.

The benefits of reduced numbers of vehicles on the road (at massive costs to the GDP of some economies) will be enormous, once they develop all the supporting systems, but that takes time.

In the meantime, vehicle production and sales have yet to peak and whilst they may be safer, that also gives many inexperienced drivers more false security and other than through campaigns on fatigue, distracted and drug and alcohol impaired driving, many are driving faster in more powerful cars, without the skills to control them.

Back to the article, I recommend it to you as a more balanced view of the changes to come.

If you don't want to read the article, here are the fundamental conclusions:

1: Industries will rise and fall. It's a great time to be thinking about new careers and investments in new segments and a great time to get out of some as well.

2: The potential benefits of disruptors are compelling. They are creating the tipping points.It usually takes disruption to manifest significant change.

3: The auto industry can lead the changes, but traditional businesses as I have frequently blogged, find it very difficult to change. It's significant that many of the changes today are not coming from Toyota, Ford or GM, but from Google, Tesla and OEMs. not to mention the Internet of Things and telecommunications.

4: The insiders and the disrupters need each other. Uber doesn't work without someone making cars, driven or autonomous. Transport networks and management need both in order to deal with urban growth.

5: Profound disruption will extend far past the automotive industry. It will pervade everything we do.

6. It will not happen as quickly as many think it will, but the benefits of the technological developments will impact on our lives soon.

 

 

 

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New map of Britain shows where all our favourite TV shows were filmed

New map of Britain shows where all our favourite TV shows were filmed | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

When Tim Ritz was asked by his wife, Kolleen, where Hastings, the setting for ITV's 1940s drama Foyle's War was, he drew a map on a post-it note.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Dear I admit that I haven't even heard of most of these shows, but if you're British you might enjoy this map.

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Could an average earner buy a home in your area? Interactive map shows

Could an average earner buy a home in your area? Interactive map shows | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Potential homebuyers looking to snap up a property solo while earning a median wage in are unlikely to be able to get onto the ladder, research from Savills shows.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is an excellent use of web map business intelligence and highlights a problem that many countries are facing,

We see the same problems in Auckland, New Zealand, although it is interesting to see that the median price in Auckland appears to be significantly higher than similar properties in Britain.

We have plenty of low cost properties in other parts of the country, however for many, the career opportunities don't line up. That means you might be able to own a home, but you might struggle to find the type of work you want to do.

In my opinion, as one who bought their first home in a rough neighborhood, because it was all we could afford. Sometimes you need to start somewhere and just get on the property bandwagon, but that wasn't the point of my blog today.

The point is that data needs to be available on a map/app that allows you to also turn on layers of information that show education options and deciles of schools, local crime statistics; industry or work opportunities as well as public transport or an efficient roading network..

If I am starting or have a family, I want to know that I can buy in an area where my family will be safe and not exposed to daily crime, the quality of education will give them a head start and they will be among students who want to learn, where there is work that suits my experience or aspirations and that its not gong to take me more than an hour to get there.

All of this is available in many countries on map applications, but why not have them all on the same map? Where do you start? How do you find them? What do you need to look for? I'm glad you asked those questions. An investment of only $5.99 today will get you an easy to read Kindle eBook with loads of information that could save you and your family a lot of money and heartache. It's not just for first home buyers either. You'll find the book here http://amzn.to/1Pl6P6o.

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Forget the engine - it's going online that's driving the car industry

Forget the engine - it's going online that's driving the car industry | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Making sure drivers are 'connected' in their cars is now the top priority for
world's top automotive executives

Luigi Cappel's insight:

I love reading stories about what executives want in their products and in this case what they feel is the most important feature that will help them maintain or grow market share and increase sales and profit. I wonder to what degree they are truly in touch with their customers and customer segments.

I've always felt that outside of hard-line dedicated fans of a particular brand or model of car, gadgets and aesthetics have always been key factors. Governments led by motoring associations help push safety features, which is just as well because individual people tend to buy based on emotional decisions, 'backed up' with facts, not because of ABS, crash ratings, number of air bags or even fuel economy.

Many people will buy their car based on comfort, the quality of the in-car entertainment system, cup holders, adjustment capability of the seats, the in-car computer (which has about the same intelligence as the workout machines in your gym, color, upholstery and their brand preference or that of their family.

Cool new features that will be popular with new drivers or those who are slightly challenged in driving skills will like leading edge features like reversing camera, self parking, and perhaps even navigation systems if maps are available for the life of the car (pretty unlikely), although most people today will get that satisfaction from their smartphone and in future probably from their watch.

If legislation does its job and all cars have to meet minimum safety standards, then for a lot of people it does come down to gadgets. It would be great to do a straw poll on what customers say they want in a car, with a view to which features would get them to buy a particular model. I do think connectivity and gadgets will be high up there, inversely proportional to the views of the lobby against distracted driving.

Would hybrid electric vehicles be up there? In principle yes, in practice, there remains fear about costs of replacement batteries, time to charge and the range of a car. Of course hybrid and electric cars are also still more expensive. Resale values are dubious and whilst I know a few people who say they will never go back to internal combustion engines, they are few and far between and several of them don't own TV's.It's not that long ago that many companies still swore by their MSDOS accounting systems.

Market Growth in foreign markets has dropped as a focus for manufacturers. I guess this means that manufacturers feel they can make enough profit in developed markets in most cases by adding services like Ford Sync. Ford seems to have figured out how to reduce costs even more by going to Blackberry for their platform, who are holding on to their existence by the skin of their teeth, could be purchased by Ford if they go belly up and would then be cheaper still.

I'm not going to go through all of the line items here. I would love your comments though. When you buy your next car, will it be based on how it is powered, how many gadgets it has, connectivity to the Internet of Things, because it can drive and park itself, price, performance or would you not buy a car at all and go for mobility as a service?

I'll make it simpler, what were the top 2 reasons you bought your last car?

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Mapped: The world's most corrupt countries

Mapped: The world's most corrupt countries | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

British officials seen as some of the most unbribeable in the world while Somalia
and North Korea rated as most corrupt

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This may not present a lot of surprises,  but you know I like a good map and this one lets you, pan, zoom and click on a country and see where it ranks on the corruption level.

I was delighted to see that my home country of New Zealand and the country of my birth The Netherlands, both being in the top 5 of least corrupt countries in the world.

What is really interesting is the way that countries cluster on this index . The biggest concern though is how many countries still rate very poorly. When we are hoping for levels of peace, equality, freedom from hunger and oppression, freedom for equal levels of education and opportunity, a united front against pollution, climate change, poverty, and generally an environment where peaceful law abiding citizens can make a good life for themselves, the map shows that we have a long way to go.

The cynic in me says that the Animal Farm will continue to prosper and that humanity represents a type of animal, not a philosophy. What do you think? Are all people essentially good? Are oppressive societies humane? 

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How self-driving cars will cut accidents 90 percent (Q&A) - CNET

How self-driving cars will cut accidents 90 percent (Q&A) - CNET | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

For Road Trip 2015, CNET talks with the University of Michigan's Peter Sweatman about the rapid merging of computers and cars, and the fake city in Ann Arbor where it's being put to the test.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is an excellent article and interview with Dr Peter Sweatman, who will coincidentally be speaking in New Zealand next month as a guest of ITS NZ. ITS stands for Intelligent Transportation Systems and ITS NZ is part of a global network of Government, Corporate and Technology companies with a variety of strong interests in motoring technology.

The interview is well balanced and its interesting to read that while most of us are still reading a lot about concepts, in Michigan they are already generations into testing including MCity, a fake downtown area that looks like a normal city, where they can test systems in cars, such as Vehicle to Vehicle V2V comms and Vehicle to Infrastructure V2I.

A lot of the investment and development is coming from Michigan DOT who are building smart corridors using dedicated short range communication DSRC (our industry has a love affair with acronyms) where vehicles communicate with each other and with the network. Vehicles know what the traffic signals are doing, they know the current speed limits, they can tell when the vehicle 3 cars in front of the big SUV (which is blocking your entire forward vision) is putting on the brakes.

You might think, because of media interest that their key focus appears to be autonomous or driverless cars, however as I've blogged before, lots of this technology is appearing in ordinary cars today. Cars are parking themselves, some brands like Volvo and BMW have technology that allows their own brands and key models to communicate with each other, thus things like adaptive cruise control gets smarter.

Some of the reasons these things are really important is because many of the systems we use are currently not intelligent at all. For example I set the cruise control in my car at around 100km per hour. Going up hills and on the flat the 4 liter car is very steady. Going downhill it's weight becomes obvious and on some of the hills on my commute I can easily be doing 106-108 and liable for a speeding fine. Of course the majority of 'navigation' systems today don't know what the normal or current speed zones are and aren't aware of maintenance programs with temporary speed limits or normal everyday safety speed recommendations that we see every day.

Given that today's technology is fallible, plus we don't have smart roads yet; and we have a very dated car stock, where it will be many years, at least a decade before there is any visible number of autonomous cars on the road, will we be safer? I'm looking forward to hearing Dr Sweatman talk and ask him about the tension between driven and driverless cars. To quote him from the attached article, " Humans cheat. They're pushing the envelope all the time, whether speeding or going through traffic signals. The machine does what it's programmed to do. It doesn't cheat."

When you go on your next road trip (In NZ we have several long weekends coming up) you will see a lot of cheating. People stuck behind congested traffic, illegally speed to make up the time they lost when they pass the accident that caused it. They overtake at illegal speeds on blind corners on the wrong side of the road. People die or are seriously injured as a consequence. Panel-beaters and car painters look forward to this time of year.

I agree with him, driverless cars, or cars hooked into ITS systems will be inherently safer. However, will they be able to protect us from drivers who are fatigued, have a lead foot, suffer road rage, are distracted, or under the influence of a substance that reduces their cognition and response times, or as I so often hear in the countryside "I know this dirt road like the back of my hand". 

Will the people who fall into the above categories want cars that stop them from reckless behaviors? I doubt it.

What do you think?

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Mapped: how buy-to-let will lose money in 91pc of regions by 2021

Mapped: how buy-to-let will lose money in 91pc of regions by 2021 | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Buy-to-let is under threat from rising mortgage rates, new regulation and
swingeing taxes. By region and city, this shows how quickly property
investments could turn sour

Luigi Cappel's insight:

So much of property investment is made by the heart and not the mind and that is one of the reasons I wrote the eBook about buying a house using location based services, apps and maps. http://amzn.to/1RATuMK

If you are buying an investment property in the UK, you will want to have a look at this article and map before you spend your money. You could find that unless you are in it for the very long haul and know you won't have any circumstances that might force you to sell, you could be on a hiding to nothing.

For the price of a bag of lemons, you could avoid a very sour face in the future.

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This Map Shows How Large Europe’s Refugee Crisis Really Is

This Map Shows How Large Europe’s Refugee Crisis Really Is | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Data visualization company Lucify used U.N. statistics to show the recent mass movement of people to the continent.
Luigi Cappel's insight:

I was looking for a map that illustrates what is happening in Europe in relation to the number of refugees moving into Europe. If you follow the link above you will find an interactive map that shows you a visualization of the hundreds of thousands of people heading into different parts of Europe. 

You can hover over a country and it will show you the paths that refugees are taking to get to that country.

The numbers are staggering and unprecedented in the modern era. These people have a singular focus to get to safety and find a peaceful place where they can start again.

Unfortunately the very nature of what they are doing means that the countries they are going to for asylum and a fresh start are changing irrevocably and just as many of the refugees feel entitled to a new life in the country of their choice, the countries aren't equipped to deal with the sheer volume of migrants.

This threatens to break up countries and the EU itself. It naturally lends itself to the uprising of nationalist fronts, fighting to hold onto the culture and lifestyle they are seeing disappear.

Many are likening this to the Middle Ages when countries were more like fiefdoms and the borders changed constantly, just as they did in the Middle East. The problem is that we no longer have a feudal lifestyle and the nature of a democracy means that it isn't possible for 'rulers' of countries to endow rights on some people and deny them to others. Elected leaders can be toppled with ease and already in some European countries prior to this crisis many leaders didn't last their elected terms.

The complexity of this situation is such that the economies of Europe, many of which are already fragile, cannot sustain hundreds of thousands of people who don't at this stage have a means to contribute to the economies of the countries they are choosing to live in. If those countries' economies fail and wealthy economies, also at risk, can't or won't bail them out, we face ethnic conflict and nationalism in a scale we have never experienced before.

This is no war between an oppressor or imperialist conqueror, it is human beings with little means to look after themselves and a sense of hope and entitlement on one side, versus people who see the country, the culture and lifestyle they feel entitled to, disappearing over a very short time, against their will.

With no solutions being developed to resolve this problem at the massive scale it is occurring,  some parts of Europe are looking very scary.

I wonder if the smart entrepreneurs of the world can find ways to quickly harness the skills, expertise and passions of the new migrants in such a way that they can contribute to their new countries before a violent backlash occurs.

At the moment it's just a tide of people who will flow, like water to a point where they have nowhere left to go and could be left to stagnate or fight for their survival. Given what they have already been through and the feeling that they have absolutely nothing left to lose, have no doubt that they will do what they have to in order to survive.

Given an opportunity, these people could add to the rich culture of countries which must inevitably evolve. Given no opportunity they will fight to survive while the Europeans will equally fight for their homelands.

New migrants thus threatened will be ripe picking for extremists groups because they will feel they have nothing to lose.

It seems ironic that while all this is taking place there are modern  cities like Ordos in China http://content.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1975397,00.html that can hold a million people and are pretty much empty.

Anyway, the point of this blog was to point you in the direction of the interactive map. Have a look here http://bit.ly/1Wkpho6

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6 Location-based Social Media Monitoring Tools : Social Media Examiner

6 Location-based Social Media Monitoring Tools : Social Media Examiner | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Do you want to reach local customers on social media? This article shares six location-based monitoring tools to use for local social media marketing.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

Obviously this is about getting people to go to the conference in San Diego and whilst I would love to, I couldn't justify the cost for my needs. This is a real shame because I would like to try more tools to see what information I can source around location beyond what I'm currently getting from HootSuite, but I don't want to have discussions with sales people when I'm not open to buy.

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Map points the way for the ultimate U.S. road trip

Map points the way for the ultimate U.S. road trip | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

13,699-mile journey stops at 50 landmarks — but you'll need some serious time off to complete it.

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This is very cool and I'm tempted to put it on my bucket list, but I would need a serious cash injection to be able to do it. My wife and I did about 3,500 miles 3 years ago in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Tennessee and the 3 weeks for that meant we missed a lot of places we had hoped to visit. I think 3 months is probably more like it.

I've had a bit of a look and there are a few places missing for me. Tucson and Phoenix for starters. I'd like more time in Nashville, which is missed out and we never made it to Kansas. All in all though this looks like an awesome trip.

I did really want to do Route 66 though.

Problem is my Lotto ticket didn't strike:(

I'll put it in my bucket list anyway. I've achieved a lot more of those things than I ever expected.

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Telemedicine, mobile health care apps like Pager bring medical care to you

Telemedicine, mobile health care apps like Pager bring medical care to you | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

When you're sick, getting out of bed for a doctor's visit can seem near impossible, but now there are apps for that

Luigi Cappel's insight:

This evolution is not going in exactly the way I expected, certainly not house calls, which in most cases that I have experienced remain very expensive, outside of routine home nursing care for people with chronic illnesses, as an alternative to prolonged stays in hospital which almost guarantees you'll end up with more than you started with. Of course I often jump to the end game and while that usually appears as I expected, the route it takes may be different.

A plethora of medical attachments to our smartphones already exist having the potential to help people with quite serious conditions lead near to normal lives.

I still don't see a strong link to location (excluding Pager's home visits) and that's where I see the greatest power as I have suggested in previous blogs. A diabetic forgets their insulin and needs help, runs a test, sends it to a server from their mobile, which identifies what the patient needs and dispatches it.

I travel a lot, often for day trips and always worry that I might get stuck a long way from home and have to stay one or two nights that I hadn't planned for. It has happened. Just the ability to prove who I am and be guided to the nearest pharmacy that is open, who have a script waiting for me, or puts them on a taxi or courier, maybe Uber and directs them to the current location of my mobile. That would be a smart business model to me and it seems no coincidence that one of the founders of Pager was also a founder of Uber.

With the aging of baby boomers, there is a potential explosion of opportunity for delivering medications, food and other essentials to people. For a business like Uber, this could be part of the normal business, like a courier, but more personal. I could imagine this delivery mechanism or person could be the same one carrying people. 

Taken another step, imagine vehicles like the Automobile Association's battery vans, that carry non narcotic (i.e not worth hijacking) products and can delivery single or small doses of medications to people in a large city. As long as your device knows who you are, such as with fingerprint or iris recognition, and it knows where you are, the potential is huge.

What do you think. Have you ever traveled away and then realized you have forgotten something you can't do without? 

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Mapped: buying is now cheaper than renting across Britain

Mapped: buying is now cheaper than renting across Britain | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it

Rising rents and rock-bottom mortgage rates mean even homeowners with huge
mortgages are better off than tenants

Luigi Cappel's insight:

But where to buy is still important and maps are pictures which explain a lot without having to read a huge amount of information. That is also the purpose of my book Buying a House - Using Real Estate Apps, Maps and Location Based Services, which you can find for a ridiculously cheap price at Amazon for your Kindle http://amzn.to/1jbAJB7

Whichever part of the world you are in, for little more than the price of a couple of cups of coffee, you could find the gem of information that helps you make that buying decision  that means the difference between a house and a home that you love to wake up in and live in.

Things like local crime, education, amenities, shops, health, traffic, the right street, demographics, are the people in the area like you?

If you are thinking of buying a house, or know anyone who is looking around, this could save you or them a lot of time and anguish.

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