Location Is Everywhere
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Location Is Everywhere
Location is Everywhere, How is it Changing our Lives? It affects everything in our daily lives. How do we manage it to live, work and play smarter?
Curated by Luigi Cappel
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Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon

Cars Are Not Driving Away Any Time Soon | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
I've been reading a book called 'Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do' by Tom Vanderbilt, which resonates very well with me. Now I'm no petrol head, but I still like driving my car and it is still m...
Luigi Cappel's insight:

It only takes a little pain to have people hop in their cars. A wet day, having to stand on a bus, or having to stand on the side of the road and watch the bus go by. Driving is part of our culture. We are how we move. Even in cities where driving is impractical, like Tokyo, I have friends who still own a car, almost a status symbol because of the costs of even parking your car. They go driving in the weekend and enjoy the countryside.

The most popular and profitable radio time, even today when so many people are connected to their smartphones for entertainment, is drive-time. Of course this is also when we get our critical traffic reports.

We don't even want to get out of our cars. An estimated 22% of ALL restaurant meals in America are ordered through the window of a car.

I really like the footer, that a pedestrian is someone who has just parked their car.

Just last night I was reading in the news that sales of new passenger cars in New Zealand have gone up in the first months of this year by 3.6% breaking a 26 year record. Sales of commercial vehicles for the first four months in this country are up 14% on the same period last year.

Still think more people are ditching their cars?

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Can Tesla’s Autopilot Be Trusted? Not Always

Can Tesla’s Autopilot Be Trusted? Not Always | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A reporter tests the company’s old self-driving software and its updated one, finding an exhilarating system that he still needed to override for self-preservation.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
A week or so ago I was driving on a motorway just after sunset and a good rain. I noticed cars in front of me driving, seemingly erratically until I caught up with their location and found that it was ghost lane markings that were confusing people. They; and I struggled to differentiate between the old and the new. Fortunately it wasn't very busy, but it could have been quite dangerous with multiple cars driving different lanes in the same place.

When road construction and maintenance companies do temporary or permanent realignments, they often pave over the top of the old surface and then paint the new lane markings on the top.

The problem is that under certain lighting conditions, mostly at night after a rain, the old markings show through and often very clearly. Given this article about how the Tesla in autopilot kept wanting to go to either the center-line or the outside of the lane, how would it handle these conditions. I suspect it wouldn't and like this story, the driver would have to be in full control of the car, rendering the driverless element redundant.

I was interested to read that the writer found peak traffic less stressful, but wasn't relaxed enough to take his hands off the wheel.

I think the key here is that a driverless car will work best on a road that is in mint condition, with clearly marked lanes and signage and no underlying legacy of previous maintenance.

I don't know that we have too many of those, it wasn't in the scope of the projects to build roads that computers could drive. 
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OnTheMove

OnTheMove | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
OnTheMove notifications inform you of significant delays to your travel on NZ’s state highways.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was looking at some of the Auckland motorway webcams just now http://bit.ly/2dsz6Qt and thinking how good it is that MOST people have their headlights on and some are keeping a safe following distance, which is cool.

I was also amazed at how many people are still on the road on such a terrible day. Obviously school holidays have started, but if you are heading to some of the places like Northland and the Coromandel ranges, you would know that weather like this causes floods, slips and trees that sometimes fall on the road.

Of course you also know that you can subscribe to free real time traffic information from the OnTheMove website https://onthemove.govt.nz/ which is now responsive, so you can use and set it up from your mobile device or register your trip before you go. 

Wouldn't you rather stop somewhere for a coffee and some food while the awesome contractors go out and face the conditions and make the road safe, rather than sitting in the middle of nowhere on a highway while your kids are getting impatient and grumpy? 

But of course given that you are a friend or follower of me, you already know all this right? But perhaps you might like to make sure your friends also know so you can all have a safe and enjoyable holiday:)
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Waze wants to eliminate 'tunnel blindness' on mobile maps - Business

Waze wants to eliminate 'tunnel blindness' on mobile maps - Business | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
By installing low-cost battery-powered beacons that will transmit to smartphones and tablets in tunnels, Waze plans to keep drivers connected in situations where GPS is lost.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Maybe I'm a grumpy old cynic but most of the services I use, know I'm in a tunnel and have software that includes the shape files or the dimensions of the tunnel, turn on night mode (making sure the GPS display is not overly bright in a dark environment) and calculates my speed and location in the tunnel based on algorithms using information such as the speed of my vehicle as I enter the tunnel. 

If other services can do that, why can't Waze and why should taxpayers pay for data that would only be available to Waze users, which is a very small percentage of all car navigation users? Wouldn't it be easier to put signage in the tunnel that 100% of customers can see, such as distance to the end of the tunnel.

They already have plenty of lights and warning systems in the event of an unplanned event such as a crash, breakdown or anything else that could interfere with your journey. 

Now for longer tunnels, if there was a system available that could repeat the GPS timing signal of sufficient satellites within a microsecond or so that all location based services could use, not just one brand, I would b a lot more interested.
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Pokemon GO ... away? Restaurants liable if distracted diners are hurt

Pokemon GO ... away? Restaurants liable if distracted diners are hurt | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
By Nicholas Resetar/ Attorney Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’re probably aware that the mobile-based augmented reality game, Pokemon GO, has taken the world by storm. This manifests itself daily in oblivious players with their heads glue
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I'm so glad I turned down opportunities to live and work in the USA. I don't like our system in New Zealand where it is very difficult to sue people for malpractice, especially where it has major consequences.

However, if someone walks into a restaurant, looking at their mobile, ignores safety cones and signs warning of wet floors (accidents happen, often caused by customers) irrespective of whether the restaurant or bar has set up a lure to encourage people to visit their premises (that's called marketing) and slips over because they are not looking where they are going, that is on the mobile phone user.

Health and safety is an important responsibility for all of us and especially for commercial destinations and workplaces, however it has to stop somewhere.

This opens up the scenarios we see from time to time of people who walk past a bus that has crashes, find an opportunity to climb on board and then join the law suit claiming to have been a passenger.

The only people that truly win in this environment are litigators. When businesses are negligent, they should be liable. When pedestrians choose to jaywalk, ignorant of their surroundings and the destination has fully met their obligations to make it difficult for people to accidentally enter a zone that has an element of risk, such as a wet floor, they have met their obligations.

There could be a case to be made that Health & Safety warnings and barriers might need to be bolstered a little, knowing customers are distracted and there is a responsibility on government to educate people to be more cautious when playing games or knowingly distracting themselves. The fact is we humans are not as good at multitasking as we think we are, but we make informed choices. If I make a bad choice, that's on me, not on a restaurant.
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1001 Startup Ideas - Ibeacons/ GPS for supermarkets

1001 Startup Ideas - Ibeacons/ GPS for supermarkets | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The startup idea is to create a mobile application which shall act as a GPS inside the supermarkets and hypermarkets.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Interesting concept. Have you asked retailers how they feel about this? My local supermarket app navigates me through the chicane in the shop to find just the products I want, it also allows me to order product online and have my groceries delivered.

The fact is that this is not how they make money. They make money by mixing it up, moving products and in some cases whole departments to different locations around the store so that as you are searching for the products you want, you are exposed to other products which you may buy.

They also have a complete science about product placement to sell companion products and to get you to buy higher profit margin by placing more profitable products on eye level shelves. Of course today most brands pay for shelf space, manage and merchandise their products themselves.

Grocers and smart hypermarket operators have it down to a fine science. They have staff who will guide you and assist you with information, but fundamentally they want you to spend more and discover new products and ideas you didn't know you wanted. They have invested billions in their technologies and I struggle to see them or even the product brands investing in making it easier for customers to get just want they want, ergo spending less.

Am I missing something?

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We Take a Ride in the Self-Driving Uber Now Roaming Pittsburgh

We Take a Ride in the Self-Driving Uber Now Roaming Pittsburgh | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Starting this morning, pre-selected Uber users in a 12-square-mile chunk of downtown Pittsburgh will have the option to ride in a self-driving car.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
"Uber won’t say when, exactly, it expects to remove the bags of meat from the driver’s seat." Now there's a line that caught me by surprise. 

What didn't was"
-Manufacturers are looking for places to test these new technologies. However there will always be a tension between innovation and regulation. 
-The driver took over on a number of occasions, such as when it wasn't slowing quick enough for a pedestrian who was crossing the road and to overtake a double parked truck, when the self driving car would have waited for the truck to move on, which could have caused some serious congestion if he had popped into a cafe for breakfast.
-They only test on extremely well mapped roads. This is very smart because it means that the knowledge based system can trust the route data and only needs to focus on what is not normal, like pedestrians, other traffic, weather and other obstacles. 

It's good to read that trials like this are taking a cautious approach. We need more quality testing and less over-inflated expectations from marketers spin. 

I do still think it's ironic that Uber is recruiting drivers, some of who will be leaving secure jobs, but fully intends in most cases to also make the drivers redundant.
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Eden Prairie father releases book on how to fight distracted driving epidemic

Eden Prairie father releases book on how to fight distracted driving epidemic | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. - As National Distracted Driving Awareness Month begins in April, a Twin Cities father released a book detailing his research on how to fix the epidemic.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I've just bought the book and no doubt it will be preaching to the converted but it would be great if there are some ideas in Vijay Dixit's book that can help reduce the risk of other people dying the same way. 

We all do it from time to time, even if it is just changing the station on the stereo or a song on Spotify or looking at your passenger during a conversation. It takes as the book say One Split Second, mostly of such an innocent minor thing, that frequently isn't even illegal, just bad luck.

A lot of people say there is no such thing as an accident, I think that is pushing the point a little far, but the key is that so many people die making the last phone call they will ever make, sending a text message and now, playing Pokemon. Spilling boiling hot coffee on your lap, is a classic. Even that means you were distracted or chose the wrong corner to do it on. The reaction to the intense heat is lizard brain, you can't just sit there and say "oops', your body will react and that could bee all it takes to not see a kid walk out from behind a school bus. 

I'm hoping the book has some answers to this growing epidemic.
Here are some simple statistics from the CDC that may surprise you;
- Every day in the US 8 people are killed in accidents that involve a distracted driver.
-Every day in the US 1,161 people are injured in accidents that involve a distracted driver.

You could ask if these are in fact accidents since things like texting, taking your eyes off the road and your hands off the wheel are choices we make. 

If you are a passenger in a driverless car and the driver suddenly swerves because the looked away to dial a number on the phone just as a car was a little too close to the center line in the opposite direction, do you let the driver know it made you feel uncomfortable?

I would love to see victims and people like Vijay talk to college kids. My father in law had a laryngectomy. He lost his voice box as a result of throat cancer from smoking. He told his story to hundreds of college children and let them look inside his stoma to see how he had to breathe and relearn how to talk. He got hundreds of cards and letters from children thanking him and saying they would never ever smoke. A lot of those were peers of my children and they were true to their word.

Perhaps more stories to those same age groups of kids who hardly have any driving experience, but can't miss a txt message or wait until they pull over might help. 

What do you do while you drive that you know you shouldn't but it's only going to take one split second?

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GPS III satellite delivery slips because of capacitor

Lockheed Martin has pushed back the delivery of the first GPS III satellite by four months after discovering that a subcontractor failed to conduct testing on a
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Given the SpaceX rocket explosion at the start of the month, this sounds like a smart decision. In my youth as a telecommunications engineer, I discovered what happens when you reverse the polarity of a capacitor. We made little rifles out of aluminium tube (not recommended) and fired thumbscrews at solid concrete walls leaving decent holes in them.

A small component that is in most electronic devices we use is potentially of high risk in a rocket with highly combustible chemicals on board. 
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SCIENCE: How Pokemon GO uses augmented reality to create immersive user experience

SCIENCE: How Pokemon GO uses augmented reality to create immersive user experience | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Pokemon GO is undoubtedly one the most popular games of the summer, generating more than $500 million in the 60 days since its launch on July 6. 
But what makes Pokemon GO, developed by Niantic, different from previous Pokemon games?
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Watch the video in this story and see a guy crash into a patrol car while playing Pokemon Go. IMHO it's dumb playing the game while you are driving, but then crashing into a patrol car is even dumber. Fortunately no one is hurt, but for those who think they can multi-task, playing interactive games and driving, the statistics are mounting up and sooner or later there will have to be creation of new offences, because accidents happen every day.

There are also growing concerns on the potential of this game to impact on business productivity and in some places like Cebu in the Philippines, Government is adding rules into their computing and phone policies saying that staff may no play the game during their work time.

Isn't it amazing how a simple little game can have such a profound impact on the health and safety of people in every country where it is available. Anyway watch the video, you don't get opportunities very often to see this side of it directly. 
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Oz Drift Confounds Autonomous Carsʼ GPS Dependency

Increased use of GPS navigation systems means ensuring "the digital-map information is in the right place on the Earth,” a Geoscience Australia spokesman says.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I've written before about when near enough is good enough and when it isn't. On a well marked freeway in good weather conditions, 1.5 yards might not be a big deal to a driverless car, but how about during a thunderstorm in Tasmania or heading up towards Bathurst during a winter storm?

It's not quite the same reason, but we have a similar problem in New Zealand based on the way we sit on the circumference of the planet, which is why we shifted systems from NZMG to NZTM to try to improve map data accuracy. 

The number of stories I have quoted where people blame the navigation system for poor decisions; see #TheGPSMadeMeDoIt is large. Take away the driver and the risk can be exponential, especially in areas where road marking is not great and there are lots of corners, not to mention road movement due to earthquakes and subsidence and systems using inaccurate or outdated map data.
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Teen off to Silicon Valley

Teen off to Silicon Valley | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Getting lost in a hospital aged 11 gave one Kiwi teen the inspiration to create an ingenious device.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Great initiative from young Kiwi Ben Bell. This brings me back to the days when I was trying to introduce solutions with Windows CE a few years ago. There were a few people working in the Ministry and Waitemata Heath that might be reading this who may remember my passion and presentations.

Indoor navigation in hospital is difficult in the public areas and even more in the bowels of hospitals, but we were way too early and if there is any advice I can give Ben is that it's a hard slog, but now we have so many technologies like low cost RFID, iBeacons and Smartphones for starters that it is a practical and there are easy low cost solutions to do what we couldn't back in the 90's. 

In addition to navigation, so many hospitals (especially in the USA are still running very old paper based filing systems. Outside of university hospitals many are way behind us in use of technology, so something that seems obvious here is probably not even being seriously considered in cities and towns where they are starting to think it might be good for council vehicles and public transport, especially school buses to be fitted with GPS. 

One of the ideas I had back in the day was around putting bar codes on customer record folders and bar codes on doorways such that you had to scan files and assign them to rooms as they go around the hospital. Today with cheap passive RFiD and beacons this could be automated at ridiculously low cost.

Do a bit of research about how much time is wasted in country hospitals around the USA where the patient arrives to see a specialist but no one knows where their patient file is. Then check out the latest stats for how many errors are still made in hospitals today. This story http://bit.ly/2cOe0wK is only 2 days old and suggests that medical errors may still represent a third of all deaths in hospitals today! If a solution saved one life per annum per hospital, what wold that be worth in ROI to the insurance companies?

Don't worry about what you want to be when you graduate. Chances are there isn't even a name yet for what your job title will be  in 10 years time, but in the meantime some demonstrable successes won't hurt your career potential. What I believe sets Kiwis apart is our ability to holistically view and see solutions where specialists vision is too narrowly focused. The challenge is not getting pounced on by people who see you as a money train but have no value to contribute. 

Fortunately today there are many successful Kiwis in Silicon Valley and other places who can help you; and plenty of people who can open doors and arrange meetings and pitch opportunities for you before you leave. 

You can't easily protect IP because not a lot of this is as new as it sounds. What isn't happening and that's where you need help, is getting startups into funding rounds and getting your first hospital system up and running and proving itself. 

Other recommendation is take advice from people who have already been successful. A lot of people such as business mentors who had advice for me basically said I was doing all the things they would recommend I should do, because that was as far as they had been taught. Of course if they had been truly successful they wouldn't have been working for councils helping startups. I'm not discounting their value for people setting up traditional businesses, but not so much for disrupting innovations.

The other challenge is being committed. If you want to make this first or any venture work, you have to be prepared to live, eat and sleep it for a while. You can rest later. If you're not ready for that, then think again or find some partners to help as many of the new rich-listers did,
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Introducing the world's first Pokemon Go insurance policy

Introducing the world's first Pokemon Go insurance policy | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Mexico's Seguro Go policy covers up to £800 in medical expenses, or £400 in funeral costs, should a Pokemon Go player suffer ‘personal injury, loss of limbs or death’ whilst playing.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is really interesting, especially comments from happy customers who feel safer now that they have Pokemon Go Insurance.

It doesn't say anything about whether you are covered if you break the law, such as jaywalking or driving. I won't feel happier having life cover if I got killed while playing Pokemon Go, but if I did get killed by someone who was playing I'd want some decent compensation, not a fraction of funeral costs. I guess they are cheaper in Mexico.

This reminds me of the insurance companies that said they would completely cover any liabilities or costs relating to crashes in driverless Volvo vehicles. I rushed off to my local Volvo dealer, but they didn't have any driverless cars available. 

So if you were in Mexico and you got mugged because you walked into a dark alley or dangerous part of town, not paying attention because you were playing Pokemon Go, I guess you would feel fine because you will have something to go towards your medical costs. Awesome:)
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DHS studying alternatives to GPS for vital sectors

DHS studying alternatives to GPS for vital sectors | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Department of Homeland Security​ is working with vital national industries to figure out what they could use as an alternative if the satellite-based GPS they rely on stopped working.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I must wonder if a lot of these stories are a consequence of the book Pinpoint by Greg Milner. I certainly didn't appreciate how many technologies are totally reliant on PNT, everything from the worlds stock exchanges to power plants and telecommunications systems not to mention the thousands of location based apps and services that are on our ubiquitous mobile devices today.

Complete value chains are reliant on knowing where products and components are in real time.

Of course there are other satellites going up and new technologies being built, but effectively the world needs to agree on one time, right down to the micro-second. Interesting what we take for granted.
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'You pay a health price for it': When fatigue can become fatal at work

'You pay a health price for it': When fatigue can become fatal at work | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Sleep deprivation and fatigue can have devastating consequences for workers in B.C.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Fatigue Science, what a great name for a company tackling a problem that may not be new, but one that is claiming a lot of victims.

The consequences may range from grumpiness, to reduced performance to fatalities. 

Examples in the article including a number of paramedics and ambulance personnel. Have you ever heard about medical staff doing doubly shifts because of short staffing levels. I happen to have close friends working in hospitals doing this and even insurance companies can tell you what the risk is, if you have surgery , based on how long theater staff have worked today and how the risk increases as the week progresses.. 

Followers of the Super Rugby will frequently hear stories about the performance of teams who have to travel from New Zealand to Argentina one week, then to South Africa the following week, then off to Australia and what an impact it has on their game. Away teams that build sleep regimes into their program are more likely to have a chance against a well rested home side.

Then there is driver fatigue, frequently added to with a couple of beers, lack of food, coffee or other things to keep them alert. 

How many of you reading have lost a friend or a colleague who took a drive that could have waited until the next morning, who have been seriously injured.

I have lost a few friends due to driver fatigue. I've had family members who fell asleep behind the wheel a close family friend who died because his driver fell asleep. I came close as a young adult, driving home after a long day's skiing, being the only sober driver under pressure to get people home in time. 

I had a guy crash into my front yard at 4AM one morning morning, his car jumped a 3 foot deep ditch, got halfway over my fence and ended up with a 4 foot high fence post impaled between the radiator and the engine in his car. He had been at a business dinner, had a few drinks (his breath reeked of alcohol, and had to be at work by 6. He was really lucky, he wasn't injured or killed, but he didn't get to work, his car was written off and I suspect that his job may have been on the line. He begged me not to tell police he had been drinking, but I had to think about my family and the next time he did it as this was not the first time for him.

What's interesting is when you start a conversation like this, everyone has a dozen stories like this.

I suffer from cancer fatigue, so I know what fatigue is and I know the risk, the big one being the consequences with how often these 'accidents injure or kill innocent parties. that's the thing that worries me most. 

Globally we seem to think "It won't happen to me". Next time you need to get from A to be in a hurry, make sure you have rested, plenty of caffeine (good for about half an hour) and preferably someone else who can take a turn behind the wheel. 

The World Health Organisation predicts that by 2020 one in three deaths will be from motor accidents. Wouldn't it be nice if one in 3 deaths was from old age?
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Corpn to monitor waste management in city with help of GPS technology - Times of India

Corpn to monitor waste management in city with help of GPS technology - Times of India | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Using global positioning system (GPS), the corporation commissioner and zonal sanitary officials can now track the trucks.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
This is similar to school-bus solutions now being used in the USA. The bus company, the school and the parents of the kids on the bus can all see where it and their children are, if its on time and have peace of mind that their kids are safe and on the way. Some systems even transmit video from the bus, which also reduces the risks of bullying.

Combining traveling salesman algorithms, demand and real time traffic, with real and historic performance data should please everyone, improving efficiency, reducing complaints and lowering operating costs. Sounds like a win/win for all concerned.

I guess the one thing that amuses me is that concepts like this continue to be 'discovered' but it really comes down to reducing pain, right? It sounds like it may be complaints that motivated the solution, but the benefits will reach a far wider community.
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Dutch sports authority may track hooligans by fingerprint, GPS

Dutch sports authority may track hooligans by fingerprint, GPS | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
When football fans get violent and charged with "hooliganism," they wind up getting prohibited from their team stadiums for a time to prevent more mayhem. Bu
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I was leaving an awesome canal-side restaurant in Holland last year when I heard screaming sirens followed by an entourage of 6 Police vehicles, 3 on each side of an ordinary looking bus. It was getting dark and I couldn't see inside.

I asked what was going on and my uncle explained that a local football side (Volendam, I think) had just been relegated from their division and the Police were there to get them to safety and protect them.......from their own fans!

Now I don't know any football hooligans but what I've seen on TV is a pack mentality and a lot of people who perhaps like their football, but they also enjoy fighting and expressing themselves in group violence. I've seen those documentaries where they plan their trip, locally or to another country and their prime purpose appears to be to chemically alter their brains and try to hurt people.

Now whilst I think this idea is a great show of initiative and I hate to be a Luddite, I can't imagine football hooligans agreeing to being fingerprinted and tracked with GPS.

I'd be looking for systems like video cameras with facial recognition (which according to TV programs is fast and ready to go even with large volumes of people) and serious punishment to those who ignore trespass orders. I have no doubt that if they tracked people's phones, the serious hooligans would use burner phones or leave their mobiles at home.

Absolutely this problem needs to be sorted by technology and there are lots of options. It's great to see some innovation being attempted. This is quite a unique problem, but the outcome could support the problem of tracking known terrorists and criminals. I expect this to be commonplace one day. Perhaps these security companies should be talking to Interpol or organisations like DARPA or MIT where a lot of these people recognition solutions have been developed.

I hear all the arguments about privacy and there are countries where freedom of speech might be a death sentence, in other countries where I trust the Government and Police and have nothing to hide, I'm prepared to sacrifice some privacy for the sake of safety. I would love to know it would be safe to go and watch  match of football, knowing that you are going to a safe public environment where you can enjoy an evening of family entertainment, such as that we enjoy in New Zealand.
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NuShield Anti-Glare Technology Helps Drivers Read Their GPS Display on the Road

NuShield Anti-Glare Technology Helps Drivers Read Their GPS Display on the Road | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
NEWTOWN, Pa., Sept. 19, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- NuShield Anti-Glare Technology Helps Drivers Read Their GPS Display on the Road.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
My first response to this was 'so what?' Then I got to the point where it solves my problem with polarized glasses.

I find it a lot less stressful wearing polarized sunglasses when I drive, especially in New Zealand where sun strike is an every day thing for most commuters because the sun's high-point or zenith is very low, it spends more time in that zone where in many cases it is shining directly in your face.

So when I look at my navigation screens, unless I have the angle just right (which means it is almost impossible for my passengers to see), my polarized glasses can barely see the navigation screen.

If they truly have this solved then I would also be targeting mobile phones,  because I have the same thing if I am outside with my smartphone. I frequently have to take my sunnies off to read messages on my phone and I buy a screen protector anyway. A film that does both is a potential big winner in my book.
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GPS getting truckers into trouble on narrow Vermont road

GPS getting truckers into trouble on narrow Vermont road | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
CAMBRIDGE, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Agency of Transportation wants global positioning service providers to help keep big rig operators from getting into trouble.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I see truck drivers doing crazy things, but constantly hear them say they are professionals and the best drives on the road. If you google #TheGPSMadeMeDoIt you will find loads of stories about crashes where people ignored signage on the side of the road and blindly followed the instructions on their navigation units.

I've been reading some bizarre stories on the book Pinpoint which is a fascinating book about the past and future of GPS. It includes a number of stories where people blindly followed the instructions of the nav, some of them lost their lives ending up in the middle of a desert or other remote locations, but the nav did nothing wrong, it followed the settings.

You probably weren't even aware of it, but your navigation system typically includes options like fastest route, no toll roads, you can even set it to ignore main roads, which one person told me was their preferred setting after a few beers at the pub on a Friday night.

There are a few navigation systems for trucks and some Fleet Management systems also have alarms to alert truck drivers if they go on roads that are not suitable for them. This story doesn't mention if the drivers were using GPS nav systems designed for trucks or cars.

What it does say is that these Vermont truck drivers must have ignored roadside signage that said the road wasn't suitable for trucks.

There are many issues these days, even about what constitutes a truck. There is a big difference between a small refrigerated food truck and a B-Train or HPMV, so it becomes really difficult to digitally record what roads meet the criteria of being safe for large vehicles. 

New technologies will help, but there is usually signage to tell people when a road is unsafe for particular types of vehicles. Frequently truck drivers ignore this data, especially if the alternative route is a long detour. We frequently see examples where truckies deliberately take marginal roads because they don't want to take a 2 1/2 hour detour and then have to be rescued because they get stuck and can't go forward or backwards. There was an example not long ago where 6 trucks ignored police instructions, saying they were locals and just going a short way up the road. The first one jackknifed and the others were stuck behind them. At least at that point, there wasn't room for any more to follow.

Here are a  simple rules.
1. Make sure the settings are for fastest route, main roads only, where possible.
2. Look out the window. If a sign says the road s not suitable for your type of vehicle, this often includes trucks, camper-vans and motor-homes; and towing vehicles, then don't risk it. It's better to arrive late, than not to arrive at all. 
3. If you drive a truck, get a truck navigation system or a Fleet Management system that has the very latest maps and warnings for the type of vehicle you are driving.
4. Look out of your window! if it looks like a lake, it probably is. 
5. Just because the truck in front of you is going up that long winding road, that has a sign warning against it because of slips, don't assume they know where they are going. If someone does something stupid, it doesn't mean you have to copy them.
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Google rolls out emergency service

Google has created and rolled out in two European countries the Emergency Location Service in Android, with other regions to follow.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
Funny, I've been suggesting that someone creates an emergency app like this for years. The New Zealand Automobile Association has done this in their breakdown service and accident app for a few years, because half the problem, especially in rural areas is customers can't describe their own location, for various reasons including being rural, dark, wet, remote or the consequences of their lucidity because of the situation.

Emergency services call center staff undergo significant geographic knowledge testing including the ability to try to tease out the location by asking people to describe landmarks and with health emergencies such as heart attacks or people going into a diabetic coma, 'Ambulance Time' dictates that the risk of people dying increases exponentially the longer it takes to get the ambulance to them.

The location of car crashes, slips, floods and other road events are a similar situation and can increase the time to clear an event when people aren't sure where the event is, for example on a long highway with no locally distinguishable landmarks. In many cases it is wrong. For example often people who report an event in Waze are already a couple of miles past the scene of the event. 

Most places these days are within range of cell towers and assisted GPS is generally powerful to get within the distance of half a football field, which is good enough in most emergency situations.

Photos remain an untapped resource. When I post photos on one of my favorite photography sites like 500PX, it automatically pulls the location metadata from the photo with remarkable accuracy even if it is somewhere like a nature trail. I am really slack when it comes to photography journaling, but if I use my Smartphone camera instead of my ageing SLR, all the information is there. 

These technologies will save lives, reduce the severity of injuries and consequential costs. The only thing that I would prefer to see is that 911, eCall, 111 calls etc are managed by national service providers who can combine local knowledge with their own business intelligence and ensure there aren't extra delays as a consequence of multiple handling.

For example a breakdown service such as the NZAA knows a lot about their members, What cars they drive, contact details and more. The app allows them to share information such as whether they might need a spare battery, petrol,, whether an air bag has been deployed and soon as these apps connect to the ODB2 ports in the car, most of this information can be shared directly from the car. 

This technology with preset access to databases for already known information is becoming more and more important as we seem to have more and more people in call centers and businesses where the national language, such as English is not the native language of the person taking the call. 

I frequently have to spell out my name to people, even my local pharmacy the other day. I started with my name, then got asked my name 3 more times, then had to go into phonetic spelling; you know Charlie Alpha Papa Papa Echo Lima and they even struggled with that. 

I'd rather have a system that has my permission because I made the call, knows who I am, any health conditions or allergies, next of kin contact details etc. Without any form of communication besides tapping an icon on the phone. Now appropriate services can be dispatched almost immediately. 

I'll finish with a link to the Daily Mail article http://dailym.ai/2d9iGML which says that if 90% of 999 calls were answered within the government specified minimum  time, in the UK, 3,000 less people would die each year from heart attacks. So what if the operators had all the data within seconds of the button be pressed and didn't need to challenge people who are barely lucid for generic details?
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Private eye sued for placing GPS device on woman’s car

Private eye sued for placing GPS device on woman’s car | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A Cobb judge is expected to rule soon on a lawsuit challenging the legality of clandestinely placing a GPS tracking device on another person’s vehicle.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
The bottom line is that privacy is a thing of the past and tracking people is so easy, especially because of the mobile phones with assisted GPS and the applications we run.

Having said that, this does not diminish our rights to privacy. If Police have to get a warrant or a court order to track someone or property, why is it acceptable for a private eye or anyone else to do it? 

Laws relating to GPS, mobile apps and tracking people need to be updated urgently all over the world because these technologies are not bounded by geography or countries. 
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GPS application Waze leads two female soldiers into Palestinian village

GPS application Waze leads two female soldiers into Palestinian village | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
ynet News: Ynetnews brings top breaking news from Israel, the Middle East, the War on Terrorism through the Israeli Palestinian Conflict to business & culture.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
There is a subtle irony here in that Waze was developed in Israel. It's also interesting that IDF soldiers are forbidden from relying solely on Waze, especially on the West Bank.

The question has to be asked as to why they weren't given access to more accurately technology if they were on official business and given the amazing capabilities of Israeli defense and other ICT developers who are reputed to be among the best solution developers in the world; and the safety risks of getting it wrong that there aren't more robust and current GPS navigation solutions available in Israel.

The rest of the story sounds like a chapter our of a movie. A Palestinian police officer gives them directions to get back to friendly ground. There is a lot of confusion and apparently multiple versions to this story. The key things are don't blindly trust your navigation system. A system has to be fit for purpose. They got away with a burnt out car and some minor injuries. It could have been a lot worse.

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Tesla's update to its self-driving software, Autopilot, puts more radar in the driver's seat.

Tesla's update to its self-driving software, Autopilot, puts more radar in the driver's seat. | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Version 8.0 of "Autopilot" juices up the electric car's radar to avoid crashes.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
When I was reading the book PinPoint: How GPS is changing Technology, Culture and our Minds by Greg Milner, I was thinking about what enhancements might have continued with radar if we hadn't developed an effective GPS technology for guidance of aircraft and their weapons systems. Radar had a lot of untapped potential that didn't need to get developed, although it has been used in a number of mapping cars combined with ultrasonic and other measurement tools.

It is great to read that Tesla is taking advantage of radar and that this technology could have avoided the fatal crash in May in Florida where the car cameras couldn't see the white truck and trailer while looking into the sun. This is a daily problem in New Zealand because the sun sits so low on the horizon such that sun-strike for drivers is near blinding and usually occurs during the busy morning and evening commuter peaks. 

The concept of sharing the radar information between all cars which updates the geospatial database, based on multiple drivers reaction or lack thereof to identified objects is great, although I'm assuming this is a cloud based database and there are still plenty of locations where mobile coverage is patchy or unavailable, so this would require more in-car data storage in order to access the millions of geospatial data points.

I was concerned that the extra load on the computers in order to do all this extra processing of the information that comes from 10 radar pings per second and matching that against the geospatial database and driver reaction database, which must be some sort of ever changing ratio of the number of times drivers braked (or didn't) at locations where nearby objects were sensed. I suspect that owners may be up for an-budgeted computer storage and or processor  upgrade in order to take advantage of the new functionality.

It's also great to see Tesla enforcing the rules that a hand or hands must be on the steering wheel. Records show that many drivers, probably showing off (a gross and uninformed exaggeration my daughter would say) drive for extended periods of time with their hands off the wheel. 

From now on, take your hands off the wheel more than 3 times in an hour and the car will pull over and you will have to reengage the auto steering system. 

I get why they have to do that, but I have to ask, why would you spend a lot more money on an autonomous car if it won't work when your hands are not on the steering wheel? I think I'll wait until the autonomous car actually can drive itself. I like the idea of the car I can send home for free parking, pick up the kids from school), do other things when I don't need it. 
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Review: Pinpoint, Greg Milner

Review: Pinpoint, Greg Milner | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
How GPS is changing our world.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
One of the more fascinating insights in this story to me is that the military didn't really want GPS. It was the potential promise of placing 5 bombs in the same hole that really allowed them to keep the project going. 

With Desert Storm and similar conflicts accuracy starting becoming really important. I have no doubt that one way or another we would have ended up in the same situation but it may have developed differently and taken a lot longer.

Many of our initiatives came out of the US military or DARPA and have very little to do with the reasons they were developed. If someone had mentioned the concept of GPS games like Pokemon to Frank McClure at Johns Hopkins APL, he might have agreed with the military in future years and shut the project down!

Ultimately we can probably thanks President Hubert Humphrey for allowing Transit satellites to be available for civilian use. Obviously there is a lot more to this story and I agree with reviewer David Herkt that this is an excellent read and far from the dry technical book it could have been. Milner's research, knowledge and writing skills turn this into a story that I would watch if it used the characterization and information to turn it into a movie.
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Pentagon Prepares Smart Bombs For Day Without GPS

Pentagon Prepares Smart Bombs For Day Without GPS | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
A curious device designed to guide U.S. air-to-ground munitions when satellite navigation aides are being disrupted will soon enter flight testing on the Boeing GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
It's a little bit funny (pardon the pun) but the US military originally didn't even want GPS, but just as well for the world that a few hardy geeks pushed on because I'm not sure I'd want to live in a world any more where GPS didn't exist. I use it dozens of times a day for everything from news to weather to navigation, to logging where I take photos, seeing where my friends and family are and so much more.

A lot of manufacturers are developing GPS jammers and a prime reason for this is national defense. With countries testing long range nuclear missiles that it seems we are unable to stop, the very least we need to be able to do is either redirect them 'safely' away from occupied areas, i.e. anywhere where there are people, or making it impossible for them to be targeted. Ideally we'd be able to send them directly back to where they were dispatched from, but that's unlikely. We should also have the ability to disable any such capability if it was used in anger, even if GPS is unavailable.

There have been many stories saying that without GPS, commerce, travel and life as we know it will grind to halt. I can't see the first mate on a container ship going back to the old sextant. Commercial aircraft will be grounded, navigation systems and so many other applications will simply stop working, so whole cities and countries could just fail to function effectively.

Obviously the other issue is that any force that can't continue to guide their defense systems would be in serious trouble, which is of course why countries want to be able to disable GPS one way or another. One day GPS will be outdated, especially in dense urban areas, but off course in a war setting, mobile telecommunications networks will also be targets and they are the current main means of assisted GPS.

There are other options, but of course when services like Google 'sniffed and stored' details of all our WiFi networks, we said cease and desist for privacy reasons. 

There will be new technologies developed, first for our defense and second a whole lot of new technologies will result from this research as it always does. 
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Pokemon Go: US city contemplates complete ban on AR-based game

Pokemon Go: US city contemplates complete ban on AR-based game | Location Is Everywhere | Scoop.it
Officials of Des Moines in the U.S. petition Niantic over accidents and overcrowding of gamers at vital Pokestops.
Luigi Cappel's insight:
I totally get the concerns of city officials in Des Moines. However they might as well ban mobile phones because this is just one of a flood of games being developed right now for everyone from Disney to 20th Century Fox to education, tourism and much more.

The problem is a global one and whilst there may be undesirables in certain areas, I've seen a lot of those crowds in my city and most of them are geeks who are now out getting exercise instead of blobbing in front of a computer at home. You can off course ask Niantic to block certain zones if it is within the ordinances or statutes of the city to do so and Niantic will probably approve that.

The other solution which I think is really important is to increase the penalties for certain types of distracted driving, because that's where a lot of the danger is. Make it really painful for people who are prosecuted, especially if hey cause damage or injuries.

This is a global problem which needs sorting urgently. Niantic are more than following protocols and ethics. Just like Waze and car navigation solutions the first screen asks people to confirm they are not driving. Th question will come back repeatedly. 

There are many ways to change people's behavior. One is punitive, another is positive reinforcement and there are many ways of doing it. For example my father in law had a laryngectomy and as president of the Lost Chord Club he visited countless schools letting children peer into his throat to see where his voice box used to be. Hundreds of kids committed to never smoking.

How about having both people who are convicted and remorseful of causing accidents while distracted tell their stories at schools, or people who have been seriously injured by distracted drivers tell their stories. You could well change people's attitudes. 

When Pokemon Go started, it was just like the first train in the USA. The wise city people said "You will never get it started". When they saw it moving, they shook their heads and said "You will never stop therm". They were right. How's your fast horse?
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