Local politicians
9 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

Singapore needs alternative voices and public political engagement

At the forum organised by the NUS Political Science Alumni, two issues dominated the discussions - the need for alternative voices in Parliament and a percei...
Mika's insight:

The workers party's chairman Sylvia Lim comments on the need of a diversity of opinion in the parliament. I agree of that point because our parliament is dominated by PAP. Just like how we learn in SOC211 that diversity is important in an organization because you have more ideas and better problem solving skills. Therefore when the parliament open up to include other members, I think that is when trouble came because it shows that the opposition parties are not ready to be part of the parliament. On the issue of political engagement, I believe social media has solved that issue because many are increasingly getting involved in politics because their political leaders are on Facebook or Twitter and they can check their activities and get updated as to what is their government doing. This video gives us insight as what other opposition party thinks we need to do to improve and I think it is a rare opportunity because usually we see it during elections period and it turns into a debate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

PM hints of coalition politics The Independent Singapore News

PM hints of coalition politics The Independent Singapore News | Local politicians | Scoop.it
It was a very direct question loaded with possibilities, something no Singapore journalist would ask of his/her PM. With the results of the 2011 election as a backdrop, Financial Times journalist Gideon Rachman asked: So can ...
Mika's insight:

This article gives a fresh insight about the PAP after the past election. In the last 2011 election, we have seen how PAP popularity was generally declining. It was therefore interesting to know that PAP has planned a route for themselves and actually think that it is possible that PAP might not be the domineering party in Singapore in the future. For many it is unthinkable that the PAP will be voted out and after 2011 elections, we began to think in a new light that there is actually a chance that the opposition party may win in the upcoming and future elections. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mika from SING A POor REmi jingle
Scoop.it!

A (dangerously) confused PAP Government

A (dangerously) confused PAP Government | Local politicians | Scoop.it

The People’s Action Party (PAP) Government’s recent proclamations about online anonymity are further signs of how confused, misguided and ill-informed our leaders have become.

Its latest moves to rein in online criticisms are not only irrational but also hypocritical, resulting in the creation and enforcement of laws which are arbitrary, politically motivated and just plain idiotic.

In the earlier days of the Internet, and specifically the (socio-political) blogosphere, the Government’s stance was always a dismissive one. The voices and views online are just insignificant noise, they would say. The Government’s favourite tool to use against this “online mob” was the mainstream media. And so, most of the time, we had articles – on quite regular intervals – being churned out by the hound dogs of the Government mouthpieces. Bloggers, in particular, were the favourite punching bags.

...the Government started off, post-GE 2011, with attempts to engage its critics and online commentators. There were behind-the-scenes sessions over tea and dinner. The PM even opened the Istana and invited online personalities to visit. Bloggers’ views were sought by Government agencies, researchers and even its mainstream newspaper mouthpieces.

There were few among the blogging community, however, who felt the Government was genuine in its so-called engagement attempts.

By 2012, however, the PAP Government had all but given up and threw in the towel.

The Prime Minister, for example, issued a letter of demand to blogger Alex Au on the 4th day of the new year this year. It was the precursor to further legal threats or actions against several websites and individuals throughout the year, with the latest attempt to haul Mr Au to the courts for contempt of court charges by the Attorney General in November.

The most significant manoeuvre, of course, was the introduction of new Internet regulations by the Media Development Authority (MDA) in June.


Via Jin Go
Mika's insight:

This is an insightful article on the privacy issue in Singapore and how it changed due to past elections. Previously we know that Singapore government tries to restrict any personal comments that strewn over the Internet. However as era changes, the government realize that they do not have that power. It is however notable that they changed that to a positive force whereby the PAP used online platforms to increase citizen's awareness of the PAP. After that, in June 2013 when the MDA re-introduce new regulations about websites users, it became clear to many bloggers and youths that the government is indeed still trying to control the opinions of people. This was a rather controversial case as many bloggers were angry and expressed their opinion on their blogs. Many followers would then adopt the same thinking as their opinion leader. This happened in 2013 after the elections therefore it can be a factor when citizens consider who to vote for in the upcoming elections.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mika from SING A POor REmi jingle
Scoop.it!

Singapore riot ignites burning class issues

Singapore riot ignites burning class issues | Local politicians | Scoop.it
Experts say problems around foreign labour need to be addressed after Sunday's riot by Indian and Bangladeshi workers.


Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, in a Facebook post, called the riot a "very grave incident … Whatever events may have sparked the rioting, there is no excuse for such violent, destructive, and criminal behaviour. We will spare no effort to identify the culprits and deal with them with the full force of the law".

Following the fatal accident, Singapore police have said the victim, identified as construction worker Sakthivel Kumaravelu., was drunk and creating a nuisance when he attempted to board the bus that eventually ran him down.

This coming Sunday there will be a complete ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol in the Race Course Road area, the focal point for Sunday afternoon gatherings of manual laborers.

As Sunday’s fatal accident culminated in the Little India riot, Singapore’s ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) had just wrapped up its weekend congress during which party members underscored the city state as a place where people from diverse racial and religious backgrounds can "live harmoniously together, embrace one another as fellow citizens and work together for a better Singapore".

Wrote one commentator on Reach, a government website that hosts public comment, about Sunday’s riot: "Quite shocking. It must also be really embarrassing for the PAP to have it happen at the very same time as the PAP convention last night. Can the PAP now still say that Singapore will be a place of harmony and security even as foreign workers are being let into Singapore by the thousands?"


Via Jin Go
Mika's insight:

The Little Indian Riot case should not be neglected when it comes to Singapore politicians. This case will definitely be brought up in future elections as the PAP White Paper states their stand on increasing the amount of foreign workers in our country and news has reported that in the riot, there was not a single Singaporean involve. Citizens will blame the government for the riot, for not handling foreign worker issues well enough as quoted from the article "Can the PAP now still say that Singapore will be a place of harmony and security even as foreign workers are being let into Singapore by the thousands?" I think it is a really good question for us to ponder about. After the riot, there were news reports in other countries saying that racial harmony is proved impossible by Singapore. Therefore the government needs to handle the case well as many Singaporeans are not fond of the influx of foreign workers and they might eventually switch their votes against the PAP.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

THE POLITICS OF WINNING PINK VOTES IN SINGAPORE | All ...

THE POLITICS OF WINNING PINK VOTES IN SINGAPORE | All ... | Local politicians | Scoop.it
Amidst the public uproar and spectacle, there was a deafening silence from Singapore's political parties. Apart from the PAP's usual stance that has been trumpeted all over the mainstream media, the positions from other ...
Mika's insight:

This is a great article because it talks about an event which not only happened recently but also links it to our politics. The analysis on the different political parties in Singapore and their views on LGBT was an eye-opening one. The least popular political party which is the Reform Party (RP) is actually working towards the repeal of Section 377A, it reflects that the party is more liberal and the LGBT community will have more propensity to vote for the RP in the upcoming elections. Next, the second most popular opposition party, the workers' party (WP) remain neutral which I think is a wise move as they would not offend the pro-LGBT or anti-LGBT supporters. Lastly our domineering party the PAP would definitely be against the LGBT society because they remain as conservatives. From this, it actually reflects what kind of people/voters will be attracted to the party. PAP will definitely be for the conservatives like the older generations, RP maybe more for the younger citizens who are more liberal and WP may be those we are in the middle and neither support PAP nor RP. This raises questions as to the future elections because it has been reported that there was an increase in the amount of participants in the Pink Dot Movement and this shows that Singaporeans are getting more liberal and could be more liberal in making choices towards political groups too. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

Politics of the pioneer generation package The Independent ...

Politics of the pioneer generation package The Independent ... | Local politicians | Scoop.it
.Here she talks about what it means for people like her, the politics behind it and how it fits in with the government's world view of welfarism. First, what do ... In Singapore the term welfare has negative connotations.
Mika's insight:

What causes Singapore citizen especially the older generation to vote for the "right" politician depends on how much the government takes care of their welfare. This is a comment by the interviewee who was waiting for the parliament to release information about Medisave. This should come to no surprise as for older generations, Medisave and Medishield is important to them as hospital chargers are expensive and takes a toll on them. It is important to note that the interviewee state that the government has been slow in responding to the ageing population but after the last election, the PAP promised to provide a solution in return for the citizen's vote. Therefore this article doesn't seem pro-PAP nor pro-opposition party but rather sitting on the fence and if PAP does not fulfill their promises on better welfare for the ageing population, PAP most likely will not stand a chance to win in the future elections as trusts has been broken. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

Good policies hampered by bad politics - Straits Times

Good policies hampered by bad politics - Straits Times | Local politicians | Scoop.it
Straits Times Good policies hampered by bad politics Straits Times “While all politicians play a role in building a political culture through political engagement, the government is the dominant player of politics in Singapore, and plays a...
Mika's insight:

News and video footage of the heated debate between PM Lee and Opposition party leader Mr Low went viral on social media platforms. I remember viewing an array of remarks with distinct pro-PAP and pro-WP people. I believe the bad politics can be seen with the increasing cost of living in Singapore which is causing many to be displeased. I think that there is no one best policy that fits all and it is indeed hard to please the public on the whole. The Straits Times mention about how the government thinks that people are not trusting their policies while the public say they actually do not trust politics more. That was an interesting stand point as what will PAP do in the upcoming elections to gain more trusts from the people? There would be many promises made by the government but whether the public accepts it will be another issue.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mika from SING A POor REmi jingle
Scoop.it!

Life in the world's most expensive city

Life in the world's most expensive city | Local politicians | Scoop.it

SINGAPOREANS will likely huddle around their TV sets in June to watch World Cup soccer – but only if they pay, once again, a fee higher than anyone else on earth.

Over lunch yesterday, my young son, who earns a normal graduate wage, confessed to me that he had not been to Orchard Road for a long time.

This tourist shopping zone is one of the world’s most expensive shopping belts.

Among the contributing factors of Singapore’s dubious promotion are cars (world’s most expensive), property (fifth highest) and military spending (highest on per capita basis).

Transport costs are almost three times higher than in New York, said the report.

In addition, Singaporean political leaders remain by far the highest paid in the world despite a pay cut two years ago.

Even an environment minister here is paid more than the US President, said an opposition supporter.

“For the ruling party, the rising cost of living is fast becoming the number one grouse,” said a People’s Action Party grassroots official.

The most pressure has fallen on the shoulders of Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam to stop the rout.

In his first comment on the EIU rankings to Parliament, he dismissed the findings as reflective of costs for expatriates and not locals.

While the minister may be right in being specific, it has become harder to separate the two since the population in today’s global Singapore is 40% foreigners.


Via Jin Go
Mika's insight:

It definitely came as a shock when the newspaper reported that Singapore has overtaken Japan to be one of the most expensive country to live. Being one of the most expensive country may be seen as a downside for the PAP because the PAP are one of the top earners despite their pay cut in 2011. Our high cost of living may decrease foreign investments and even PAP own grassroots leader said that this report makes it difficult to fight during the next election because the citizens will complain about the living costs and how their pay remains stagnant but everything else such as transportation, food etc are increasingly on the rise. It would be interesting to know how the PAP will respond to such comments during the next election. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mika from SING A POor REmi jingle
Scoop.it!

Concentration of wealth & power makes our country sick

Concentration of wealth & power makes our country sick | Local politicians | Scoop.it

“Hyper-inequality is not an inevitable outcome. It is a result of political capture that creates wealth for the rich and marginalises others. The rules are rigged through financial deregulation, tax evasion, unregulated monopolies …”.

In 70 years of fighting poverty and injustice, Coates says Oxfam has witnessed first-hand how the wealthiest individuals and groups capture political power at the expense of the rest of society.

The lowest tax rates, the best health and education, and the opportunity to influence are being given not just to the rich but also to their children.

It is not difficult for readers to recognise these very same happenings in Singapore. The people in government, through decades of unfettered power, have increased their personal wealth tremendously. The Singapore politicians are the highest paid in the world. If it wasn’t for the 2011 GE which tarnished the ruling party’s results somewhat, they would not even think of lowering their humongous salaries through a review committee which was setup immediately after 2011 GE to quell public anger. Even so, their salaries still remain the highest in the world.

Their powers and privileges are shared only within a very small circle of close allies and followers. It has been disclosed in the media [Link] that the ruling party’s Central Executive Committee (CEC), the highest ruling committee in the party, is controlled by more than 1000 cadres. They are the stalwarts with the right to vote-in the party’s top leadership and the register of cadres remains confidential. Imagine, the fate of whole Singapore is in the hands of these more than 1000 people.

The cadre system has always been veiled in secrecy. In her 1971 political science thesis, Singapore’s People’s Action Party: Its History, Organisation and Leadership (Oxford University Press), Ms Pang Cheng Lian describes the CEC voting as a “closed system”, in which “the cardinals appoint the pope and the pope appoints the cardinals”.

The powers-to-be have built around themselves a thick, high and impenetrable wall of elitism of the highest order thus allowing the gulf between the haves and have-nots to grow even wider.


Via Jin Go
Mika's insight:

We learn that Singapore governments are one of the highest paid people when you compare to other countries. I think this point is note-worthy as the article has mentioned that since this news has been noted by the public, the PAP reduced their salary during the 2011 election however their salaries are still one of the highest. Although I believe that the government do deserve such pay because of what they do for the country but many others especially younger generations feel very unfair. I have heard many comments saying that unemployment is prevalent and the government is doing nothing but earning more money. Wealth is a sensitive issue and the government has been trying to do its best to give money back to the society, people may not be willing to vote for them again. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

PAP's good old politics The Independent Singapore News

PAP's good old politics The Independent Singapore News | Local politicians | Scoop.it
The People's Action Party has made its best moves so far to recover lost ground with older voters. The measures have come almost thick and fast. This Sunday (Feb 9), Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong will host a dinner for ...
Mika's insight:

I think this is a very smart move on the Prime Minister's part as he clearly understands that most of his voters belongs to the older generation therefore he chose to focus on them and give them benefits to make them as loyal voters. However I feel that this move needs to have precaution as it could anger the other population. This is because the Prime Minister is trying to focus efforts on increasing employment for the older generation but what about the other generations? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mika
Scoop.it!

[omy.sg] Hougang By-Election: People's Action Party - Desmond Choo's speech

omy.sg: Hougang By-Election LIVE coverage PAPs' Desmond Choo, confirmed as one of the two candidates contesting in the Hougang By-Elections, gives his one mi...
Mika's insight:

This video was from the last elections and I think it is a worthy case to watch. This is because PAP eventually lost for the Hougang district and it was a shock to many Singaporeans (mainly because most Singaporeans are pro-PAP). Although the video is short, we can see the people's reaction. This is very important because from people's reaction we can tell how they might react in the next upcoming election. It is surprising that there is a equal amount of pro-PAP and pro workers' party supporters. This shows that Singaporeans are getting more liberal in their voting and no longer just vote the popular choice but actually gave thought to the opposition's speech. 

more...
No comment yet.