Local Government Structure and Processes
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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
Regina Chu's insight:

Comparison of countries allows students to see different perspectives and lifestyles of children and families all around the world. 

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, April 25, 2014 2:20 AM

An interactive website comparing countries using a range of different factors.

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Resource 5: Parliament Education Office Multimedia Videos

Resource 5: Parliament Education Office Multimedia Videos | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
Get a 'snapshot' on important elements of Parliament, find out how Parliament works, or learn how to teach a role-play in the classroom.
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“Three Levels of Government” video delineates 3 levels of law making to serve Australia. Federal/ National parliamentary government makes laws for the whole country, and covers issues like immigration, marriage, communications, taxation, defence and foreign affairs. State government meet in the capital city of each state and make their own laws enforced in respective state or territory, relating to areas not covered in the Australian Constitution – such as schools, hospitals, roads, railways, electricity, water, mining and agriculture. Local government is made up of over 560 councils across Australia, and are responsible for issues such as local roads, parks, rubbish collection, libraries, street signs and pet control.

 

After watching the video, students will be divided into these three areas of law making and role play their specific duties to the people of Australia. There is also a fact sheet (http://www.peo.gov.au/learning/fact-sheets/three-levels-of-law-making.html) available for teachers to help consolidate student understanding and learning in the classroom. In this role play task, students are facilitated to “describe how decisions are made in government and the roles and responsibilities of those involved” (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37) as well as “explain the processes involved in civic action within the community” (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37). It is crucial to note that the “emotional atmosphere of a classroom matters and is essential to learning (Goleman, 2013). Students are empowered with their inner focus of cognitive control as they participate in an “authentic, or real-world, nature of the task” (The Creative Educator, 2013, p. 20) as students work in a relevant and interesting way” (The Creative Educator, 2013, p. 20). Through requiring students to solve a real world problem, an authentic task creates a bridge between the content learned in the classroom and why this knowledge is applicable and important to the world outside of it (The Creative Educator, 2013). Furthermore, working in teams on complex problems requires skills and expertise, helping students identify their own strengths and weaknesses and driving them to achieve their team goals (The Creative Educator, 2013).

 

References

-       Goleman, D. (2013). Daniel Goleman: Three Kinds Of Focus. Accessed 9th April, 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWuvkF5jNmo&list=SP10g2YT_ln2gmPbtzIWIPXKsNR2_-BrWn&index=2

-       NSW Board of Studies. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S

-       The Creative Educator. (2013). Writing a Great Authentic Task: A guide to incorporating collaboration, real-world problems, community connections and self-directed learning. 

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Travel the World from Your Classroom: Free iPad Apps for Virtual Field Trips

Travel the World from Your Classroom: Free iPad Apps for Virtual Field Trips | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
Not every school has the resources necessary to take their students on an airplane . . . or spaceship. The iPad can bring the world to your students' fingertips in ways never before possible. Many na
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Teaching | Parliamentary Education Office

Teaching | Parliamentary Education Office | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
The teaching section of the website contains lesson plans to help you teach students about federal Parliament. These include: Role-play Lesson Plans, Parliamentary Lesson Plans and Mini Role-play Lesson Plans.
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Resource 1: Using Kidsview

Resource 1: Using Kidsview | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
Kidsview is a collection of animations and interactives which make learning about parliament fun and accessible.
Regina Chu's insight:

This digital resource is an interactive website which comprises of a few games and animations, enabling students to learn about different aspects of the Australian government. This resource provides a platform for students in stage 2 to utilise many skills as they "investigate rights, responsibilities and decision-making processes in the school and community and demonstrate how participation can contribute to the quality of their school and community life" (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37).

 

This is a particularly enriching resource as students use ICT to increase their motivation to learn (Passey et al., 2004 in Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011). These simple activities have individual hyperlinks which direct students to their individual choice, most of which correlate with the syllabus. For example, there is an activity called “Make a Difference: Be an active citizen and make a change in your community” which encourages students to not only “get informed” through reading books on the subject, interviewing an expert, tuning into news and current issues, research on the creek and investigate. Furthermore, the character tries to “get active” through realistic and positive ways such as starting a lobby group, raising awareness at community meetings, writing a letter to the local newspaper and raising money or organising events. In turn students learn to “make a difference” as is their right and responsibility as a member of their local and national community. We follow the protagonist’s journey throughout different situations and he has “turned a problem into a solution! Now I know I can use my voice to participate in making decisions that affect the places where we live.”

 

After completing a number of their chosen activities and games, students are to choose their own issue and proposed action to try and fix this. This addresses how students can achieve indicators such as:

-       Contribute to decision making processes

-       Contribute to the quality of their community life

 

Throughout the use of this resource, teachers must ensure that they “implement teaching strategies for using ICT to expand curriculum learning opportunities for students” (NSW Institute of Teachers, 2012, page 11) and establish appropriate placement of restrictions, i.e. students are responsible enough to know not to access unsuitable sites or games. It is crucial that students understand they’re learning is self-directed and that it is a big responsibility (The Creative Educator, 2013).

 

References:

-       Gilbert, R. and Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

-       NSW Board of Studies. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S

-       NSW Institute of Teachers. (2012). National Professional Standards for Teachers. South Sydney, Australia: NSW Institute of Teachers.

-       The Creative Educator. (2013). Writing a Great Authentic Task: A guide to incorporating collaboration, real-world problems, community connections and self-directed learning. 

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Teaching activities | Global Education

Teaching activities | Global Education | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
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A list of potential activities which are relevant specifically to Stage 2 (Years 3 - 4) provided by Global Education and linked to "Investigates rights, responsibilities and decision-making processes in the school and community and demonstrates how participation can contribute to the quality of their school and community life" (SSS2.8, NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37). 

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Resource 4: Indigenous Literacy Foundation

The Indigenous Literacy Foundation (ILF) raises awareness and funds for children in remote Indigenous communities across Australia.

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This YouTube clip, created by the Indigenous Literacy Foundation, raises awareness and funds for children in remote Indigenous communities across Australia. The Foundation believes that bridging the gap of literacy opens doors for children, and will provide opportunities for employment, better health and wellbeing in the future.

 

In addition to having students watch this clip, they will access the Indigenous Literacy Foundation home page (http://www.indigenousliteracyfoundation.org.au/) continuing to explore the significance of this Indigenous organisation and their contribution to community life (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37). Students also investigate the current community issue of the gap between academic achievements of non-Indigenous and Indigenous students in Australian schools. This organisation provides an Aboriginal pperspective that “recognises and values Aboriginal culture and identity” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003, p. 10). Students and teachers learn to empathise which is an inner focus of being able to understand other people’s perspectives (Goleman, 2013) and in turn take action and actively participate in the community.

 

Over the past four years they have delivered more than 100,000 new books to over 230 communities nationally. The Indigenous Literacy Foundation also runs an early literacy project, Book Buzz, which delivers quality board books into the hands of babies, toddlers and mums in four remote communities; Manyallaluk in NT, Yakanarra and Warburton in WA and Wilcannia/Menindee in NW NSW. In Warburton, they have translated these books into the first language, with remarkable results. The Foundation also publishes and funds specific community literacy projects, some of these include publishing in language. In 2013 they published community books for Thursday Island, Cherbourg in QLD, and Warburton and Yakanarra in WA. 

 

References:

-       Goleman, D. (2013). Daniel Goleman: Three Kinds Of Focus. Accessed 9th April, 2014 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWuvkF5jNmo&list=SP10g2YT_ln2gmPbtzIWIPXKsNR2_-BrWn&index=2

-       NSW Board of Studies. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S

-       NSW Department of Education. (2003). The Aboriginal Education K- 12 Resource Guide.

-       The Creative Educator. (2013). Writing a Great Authentic Task: A guide to incorporating collaboration, real-world problems, community connections and self-directed learning. 

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Resource 3: Australian Red Cross

Resource 3: Australian Red Cross | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
Australian Red Cross is there for people in need, no matter who you are, no matter where you live.
Regina Chu's insight:

The Australian Red Cross home page allows students to “identify the contributions made by some community organisations, and groups to the quality of community life” (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37). It adds an inner, deeper, three dimensional global perspective to their learning as they gain meaning and understanding from an “authentic task” – which “requires students to demonstrate proficiency by applying existing knowledge to solve a real world problem” (The Creative Educator, 2013, p. 20). Students may also describe how rights might conflict (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 37).

 

The Australian Red Cross emphasises “the power of humanity, providing relief in times of crisis, care when it’s needed most and commitment when others turn away” (Australian Red Cross, 2014). Their key principles humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity and universality – all contribute to a student’s sense of self and how they can take part, actively and positively, in their local community, and perhaps in the near future, the global community. This resource can be used as the focal point of a lesson. Students sit down in small groups, discussing the roles, rights and responsibilities of individuals in the community, and how different charities and non-government organisations help achieve these basic rights for people all around the world, thus bettering their quality of life and their future. In doing so, students develop empathetic and understanding values and attitudes of the world around them. “The development of values and attitudes underpins learning and teaching in Human Society and Its Environment. Values and attitudes related to social justice, intercultural understanding, ecological sustainability, democratic processes, beliefs and moral codes and lifelong learning are incorporated” (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 5).

 

In addition, Red Cross also focuses on aiding Indigenous Australian communities. The Red Cross aims to “support families and communities as they dtetermine and lead their own solutions to achieve positive change. This means we ar guided by, and answerable to, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and organizations we work with” (The Australian Red Cross, 2014).

 

Other potential links as an extension include:

AusAid - http://aid.dfat.gov.au/Pages/home.aspx

UNICEF - http://www.unicef.org.au/?gclid=CJ_-ytafmpgCFRwpawodQ0eY3A

United Nations - http://www.un.org/en/

Country Woman’s Association –http://www.cwaa.org.au/

 

References:

-       Australian Red Cross. (2014). Australian Red Cross: 100 Years of Helping People. Accessed 9th April 2014 http://www.redcross.org.au

-       NSW Board of Studies. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S

-       The Creative Educator. (2013). Writing a Great Authentic Task: A guide to incorporating collaboration, real-world problems, community connections and self-directed learning. 

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Resource 2: MY Neighbourhood

Resource 2: MY Neighbourhood | Local Government Structure and Processes | Scoop.it
Regina Chu's insight:

This online link is another resource which is another “unprecedented opportunity for engaging students in learning in new ways, enabling teachers to do things that are not otherwise possible and leading to better teaching” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 181). This activity promotes intrinsic motivation within the classroom environment which “remains an important construct” as it reflects the “natural human propensity to learn and assimilate” (Deci & Ryan, 2000, p. 54).

 

Students can navigate through 5 different roles which they can immerse themselves. The observer allows students to record a journey through their neighbourhood. The looker and listener explore different sights and sounds of the neighbourhood. The decision maker contemplates the issues regarding development in the neighbourhood. The explorer finds out what makes different neighbourhoods unique. The planner builds their own town. For example, one of the scenarios the decision maker faces is to choose the most appropriate site to build a library in the community. The site guides student’s higher order thinking through prompts such as: Who uses the library? What are important issues for users? Is it easily accessible? Discuss its proximity to other facilities, e.g. schools, parks, trasnportation and shops. In doing this, students not only “develop knowledge and understandings about social groups and economic, political and legal systems to understand roles, rights and responsibilities of participation within those social groups, systems and structures” (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 8) but also develop skills in acquiring information, using the inquiry process and participate through taking on an active, responsible and informed role as citizens in a rapidly changing and diverse global society (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p. 8). Working in collaborative, heterogeneous teams prepares students for modern citizenship and work, as most complex communal, social and workplace problems are solved by groups of individuals (The Creative Educator, 2013).

 

References:

-       Deci, E.L. & Ryan, R.M. (2000). Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivations: Classic Definitions and New Directions. New York, Contemporary Educational Psychology: Academic Press, 54 – 67.

-       Gilbert, R. and Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

-       NSW Board of Studies. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S

-       The Creative Educator. (2013). Writing a Great Authentic Task: A guide to incorporating collaboration, real-world problems, community connections and self-directed learning. 

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teaching inquiry learning

@alcp One more- whiteboard animation on Inquiry Learning (abt a program called HSIE, though concetps are more global) http://t.co/OzTV2SRGD9

Via Kate ferguson-patrick
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