Living
Follow
Find tag "living"
890 views | +0 today
Living
A Place to Discover and Grow !
Curated by Peter Dopson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Why We Go to the Met Every Sunday (and Have for 60 Years)

Why We Go to the Met Every Sunday (and Have for 60 Years) | Living | Scoop.it
Why We Go to the Met Every Sunday (and Have for 60 Years)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Science News
Scoop.it!

Dogs Understand Human Perspective, Study Suggests

Dogs Understand Human Perspective, Study Suggests | Living | Scoop.it

A recent study reveals that dogs are much likely to steal food in the dark when humans cannot notice them, indicating they understand a human's perspective.

 

The study, conducted by Dr. Juliane Kaminski of the University of Portsmouth's Department of Psychology, claims that when humans forbid the dog from eating the food, he is four times more likely to steal the food that he was forbidden to eat in the dark. This behavior in dogs reveals that they can change their actions based on what humans think and feel. They take into account what humans can see and what they cannot.

 

"That's incredible because it implies dogs understand the human can't see them, meaning they might understand the human perspective," Dr. Kaminski said in a press statement.

 

This study, funded by the Max Planck Society, is the first that describes how dogs distinguish between different levels of light when they are making strategies to steal food. According to Dr. Kaminski, humans attribute a few qualities and emotions to other living things. It is we who think that the dogs are clever or sensitive, not the dogs themselves.

 

A series of experiments were conducted in different light conditions. In each test, the humans forbade the dog from eating the food. On conducting these tests, she noticed that the dog ate more food in the dark and that too quickly, as compared to when the room was lit.

 

The study had 42 female and 42 male domestic dogs who were 1-year-old or more. She made sure she selected those dogs that were comfortable without their owner, even if it was a dark room. The report states that the tests were complex and involved many variables to rule out that dogs were basing their decisions on simple associative rules, for example, that dark means food. It is not known how well dogs can see in the dark, but the study shows that they can differentiate between light and dark.

 

The researcher concludes saying, "The results of these tests suggest that dogs are deciding it's safer to steal the food when the room is dark because they understand something of the human's perspective." Further studies have to be conducted in order to discover the mechanism that controls the dog's behavior. Previous studies have indicated that dogs consider human's eyes as an important signal in deciding how to behave. For those people who are attentive toward dogs, the animal responds more willingly.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Sakis Koukouvis
more...
Greg Wurn's comment, February 14, 2013 3:33 PM
I lived on a property with tall open forest all around for 20 years, my dogs used to regurlary chase after other animals that came near the camp, they would tear off into what appeared to me to be pitch dark, not once in 20 years did any of my dogs injure themselves on fallen branches etc, I suspect that they can see very well in the dark !
Vasileios Basios's comment, February 18, 2013 8:16 AM
... but not vice versa .. we can safely pressume ;-)
KathyTarochione's curator insight, March 4, 2013 4:35 PM

Charlie could have told you this.  He knows it's true.  Hey, just ask Charlie.

Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Can vegans stomach the unpalatable truth about quinoa?

Can vegans stomach the unpalatable truth about quinoa? | Living | Scoop.it
Joanna Blythman: Ethical consumers should be aware poor Bolivians can no longer afford their staple grain, due to western demand raising prices
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

How I Changed Careers When I Was Nearly 40 - Forbes

How I Changed Careers When I Was Nearly 40 - Forbes | Living | Scoop.it
As a single woman in her late 30's, things were good. I could have kept speeding up the corporate ladder, but I wanted to try something new.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Neuroscience offers a glimpse into the mind; and our future (Part 3 of 3)

Neuroscience offers a glimpse into the mind; and our future (Part 3 of 3) | Living | Scoop.it
Hassan Rasouli recently accomplished a remarkable feat: He lifted his thumb in a way that suggests he was making a thumbs-up gesture.

The feat was a remarkable one since doctors at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto had diagnosed him as being in a persistent vegetative state (PVS), a mysterious condition in which patients appear to be awake but show no clinical signs of conscious awareness.

The condition first came to prominence in 1998 when family members, and then courts and politicians, engaged in a protracted battle over the care of Floridian Terri Schiavo. The matter was finally settled in 2005 when Schiavo, who was in a persistent vegetative state, was removed from life support and died.

Doctors at Sunnybrook similarly wanted to transfer Rasouli to palliative care, but Rasouli's family refused. The doctors therefore sought a court order, and the Supreme Court of Canada heard arguments in the case on Monday.

The court's decision might not affect Rasouli since, given his ability to give a thumbs-up gesture, he is no longer considered to be in a persistent vegetative state (PVS). But the case could have a profound impact on the many other patients who have been diagnosed as being in a PVS, as it could answer pressing legal questions about when someone can be removed from life support, and who has the authority to order that such support be discontinued.

The Rasouli case also raises further troubling questions of fact: Was Rasouli's ability to give a thumbs-up gesture an indication that his condition had improved, or was he never in a persistent vegetative state? Was he, and other people similarly diagnosed, always consciously aware, but, thanks to being trapped in a paralyzed body, unable to express his thoughts?
Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cancer's Global Footprint

Cancer's Global Footprint | Living | Scoop.it
Cancer is often considered a disease of affluence, but about 70% of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.
Explore this interactive map to learn about some cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.

 

With this interactive map, users can explore cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.  How do these spatial distributions correlate with other developmental, consumption or economic patterns?  What surpises you about this data?   

 

Tags: medical, mapping, spatial.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:04 PM

The high rates of cancer in the United States and other wealthy countries was not surprising, the high rates of liver cancer in West Africa was. Similarly, the very high rates of liver and stomach cancer in China and Mongolia was shocking since the apparent cause is salty, pickled foods.

 

I imagine 30 years from now the rates of lung cancer will drop off a cliff for the United States, but I wonder if the same would be true for Poland which also has a very high rate of lung cancer.

Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Brain waves encode rules for behavior

Brain waves encode rules for behavior | Living | Scoop.it
One of the biggest puzzles in neuroscience is how our brains encode thoughts, such as perceptions and memories, at the cellular level.

Via Wildcat2030
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Hostess is going out of business, putting 18,500 out of work | News | Financial Post

Hostess is going out of business, putting 18,500 out of work | News | Financial Post | Living | Scoop.it
Hostess Brands, the bankrupt maker of Twinkies and Wonder Bread, said it had sought court permission to go out of business after failing to get wage and benefit cuts from thousands of its striking bakery workers...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Autism on the Rise and a Young Mother's Struggle - New America Media

Autism on the Rise and a Young Mother's Struggle - New America Media | Living | Scoop.it
New America Media is a nationwide association of over 3000 ethnic media organizations representing the development of a more inclusive journalism.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

Why We Keep Getting the Same Old Ideas

Why We Keep Getting the Same Old Ideas | Living | Scoop.it

"Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabridge Uinvervtisy, it deosnt mttaer in waht oredr the litteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a ttoal mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is besauae ocne we laren how to raed we bgien to aargnre the lteerts in our mnid to see waht we epxcet tp see. The huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. We do tihs ucnsolniuscoy. (....)


"When information enters the mind, it self-organizes into patterns and ruts much like the hot water on butter. New information automatically flows into the preformed grooves. After a while, the channels become so deep it takes only a bit of information to activate an entire channel. This is the pattern recognition and pattern completion process of the brain. Even if much of the information is out of the channel, the pattern will be activated. The mind automatically corrects and completes the information to select and activate a pattern.This is why you can read the jumbled letters above as words.

 

This is also why when we sit down and try to will new ideas or solutions; we tend to keep coming up with the same-old, same-old ideas. Information is flowing down the same ruts and grooves making the same-old connections producing the same old ideas over and over again. Even tiny bits of information are enough to activate the same patterns over and over again. (...)

 

How then can we change our thinking patterns? Think again about the dish of butter with all the preformed channels. Creativity occurs when we tilt the dish in a different direction and force the water (information) to create new channels and make new connections with other channels. These new connections give you different ways to focus your attention and different ways to interpret whatever you are focusing on. Nature gets variation with genetic mutations. Creative thinkers get variation by conceptually combining dissimilar subjects which changes our thinking patterns and provides us with a variety of alternatives and conjectures. (...)"


Via Amira, Samuel H. Kenyon, Wildcat2030
more...
dephunked's comment, September 26, 2012 9:47 AM
Wlidcat,

...I´ve thought about how creative thinkers have been discriminated throughout modern civilization...

...as novelty naturally falls outside the norm, and modern civilization has been inherently, systematically norm-biased, I have this feeling that non-successful creatives have been subjected to significant social and systematic discrimination...

...top down bureaucratic organization shaped the social norm to disclude creativity, novelty thinking, and social evolution, the majority of those innately prone to innovation could count on little help and reward from the norm-biased surroundings... their life was a life of struggle...

...It´s unnatural for a creative neurotype to conform to the norm, the evolutionary origin and purpose of creativity is cultural evolution. Creativity evolves the norm, it cannot fit into it, and within the creative thinkers, the creative drive is stronger then the drive to conform...

...during my brief medical practice amongst those at the bottom of civilization, the homeless, I saw so much misunderstood potential, so much creativity and ingenuity and empathy, and so little recognition from their "society". Systematically discouraged and misunderstood, forced into poverty and stigma-generated alienation...

...in every one of them, I saw myself...


These social patterns are typical for many shortcomings of top-down bureaucracy, but I have a feeling that creative thinkers in particular have suffered from the hegemonic-ish norm. I haven´t found much literature about it, and I believe it´s important for society to acknowledge this, just as important as the pride movement to end and avow the discrimination of homosexuality. Important at least, as a reminder of the darker angels of our past.

...what do you think?
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Midlife exercise 'protects heart'

Midlife exercise 'protects heart' | Living | Scoop.it
Ensuring you get enough exercise in midlife will help protect your heart, study findings suggest.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

How To Build Your Business In Hyper-Local Markets: Research, Relate, Reinvent - Forbes

How To Build Your Business In Hyper-Local Markets: Research, Relate, Reinvent - Forbes | Living | Scoop.it
Too many national brands use blanket communications to try to penetrate local markets. If you really want to make an impression in a hyper-local market, you're going to have to do better than that.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Not Your Average Saturday: The Inaugural Day of Service Is Your Chance For Greatness

Not Your Average Saturday: The Inaugural Day of Service Is Your Chance For Greatness | Living | Scoop.it
Not Your Average Saturday: The Inaugural Day of Service Is Your Chance For Greatness
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

In CA, Standardized Teacher Evaluations Trip Over Wealth Gap - New America Media

In CA, Standardized Teacher Evaluations Trip Over Wealth Gap - New America Media | Living | Scoop.it
New America Media is a nationwide association of over 3000 ethnic media organizations representing the development of a more inclusive journalism.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

The mushroom that gave Christmas its colours

The mushroom that gave Christmas its colours | Living | Scoop.it

In modern times, red and white have become universal symbols of Father Christmas and the festive season. There is even a widespread belief that an advertising campaign from a ubiquitous soft drinks company was the defining point where Christmas became red-and-white in the hearts and minds of millions around the world.

 

However, nature came up with the red-white combination a much longer time ago – and it may also have been the origin of tales of flying reindeer as Dr Andy Taylor, molecular fungal ecologist at the James Hutton Institute, explains.

 

“Mushrooms are fascinating things. They are not part of the animal, plant or bacterial kingdoms, but they have a kingdom of their own – the Fungi,” he said.

 

“Although it is usually only seen in woodlands until late November, the Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) a white-spotted, red-capped fungus, features prominently on Christmas and postcards, in fairy tales and even video games. It is commonly listed as poisonous due to its psychotropic properties and it has reportedly been used in shamanistic rituals in different parts of the world.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse

5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse | Living | Scoop.it
Our universe may be one of many, according to numerous physics theories.

Via Leopoldo Benacchio, Guillaume Decugis, olsen jay nelson, Wildcat2030
more...
Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, December 10, 2012 3:43 PM

A good high-level recap of all the different theories behind the multiple universes concept (yes there are also multiple theories of multiple universes: isn't that meta?).

Gestcash's curator insight, December 23, 2012 10:39 AM

The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up a "multiverse."

Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

An Unusual, Adventurous, Indiana Jones-Type Vacation Company - Forbes

An Unusual, Adventurous, Indiana Jones-Type Vacation Company - Forbes | Living | Scoop.it
(photos courtesy Epic Tomato) There are those among us for whom a quiet vacation sipping tropical drinks on a pearly beach beside a sapphire blue ocean holds no sway.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

11 Ways You're Sabotaging Your Future - Forbes

11 Ways You're Sabotaging Your Future - Forbes | Living | Scoop.it
We justify not saving for retirement in all kinds of ways. Here are the top retirement lies, why they aren't true, and how to beat them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Pakistani Assemblywoman: Girls’ Education Key to Ending Terrorism - New America Media

Pakistani Assemblywoman: Girls’ Education Key to Ending Terrorism - New America Media | Living | Scoop.it
New America Media is a nationwide association of over 3000 ethnic media organizations representing the development of a more inclusive journalism.
more...
Jacob Cooney's curator insight, May 7, 2014 11:11 PM

This article, like many others, including HTS, focuses on improving girls' education around the world (in Pakistan in this article).  This article also claims that this will decrease terrorism, which is a reason that I selected the article.

Robert Slone's curator insight, September 16, 2014 6:59 AM

 If you educate the women, they will in turn educate the children and everyone benefits.

Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Dear Lunch Ladies, Thank You. Sincerely, The Parents.

Dear Lunch Ladies, Thank You. Sincerely, The Parents. | Living | Scoop.it
This Food Revolution is about saving America's health by changing the way people eat. It's not just a TV show; it's a movement for you, your family and your community.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Peter Dopson from Susan Bainbridge - ePortfolio
Scoop.it!

Changing the Education System— It’s Complicate | Organizational Survival Playbook

Changing the Education System— It’s Complicate | Organizational Survival Playbook | Living | Scoop.it
--- it struck me (once again) that education systems are simply a reflection of business and societal norms.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

HOW TO CONQUER 3 OF YOUR MOST LIMITING CAREER FEARS

HOW TO CONQUER 3 OF YOUR MOST LIMITING CAREER FEARS | Living | Scoop.it
Whether you’re looking to start your own business, are a recent college grad looking to embark on a more traditional career path, or are un(der)-employed and looking for a fresh start, we all face the same obstacles.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Peter Dopson
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Why Don't Americans Recycle? - Environment - GOOD

Infographic: Why Don't Americans Recycle? - Environment - GOOD | Living | Scoop.it
Just half of Americans recycle daily, and 13 percent don't recycle at all.
more...
No comment yet.