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Do-It-Yourself Urban Design - The Ideas Arcade

Do-It-Yourself Urban Design - The Ideas Arcade | Livability | Scoop.it
What would you fix if you could in your neighbourhood? If it involves any kind of physical civic improvements – better signposting perhaps, or... (Bypassing city planning bureaucracy with DIY urban design (but is it just for hipsters?
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The Four Questions to Ask When Choosing a Best Place to Live - Livability.com Best Places Blog – Livability.com Blog

What do you really need to know to figure out where you should want to live? Turns out, you need only ask yourself (and the best places to live data) four questions if you're considering relocating.  This list is based on research partner from our academic partner, Kevin Stolarick at the Martin Prosperity Institute. Dr.…
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How to Make Your City a Best Place to Live - Livability.com Best Places Blog – Livability.com Blog

How to Make Your City a Best Place to Live - Livability.com Best Places Blog – Livability.com Blog | Livability | Scoop.it
Everybody knows that livability is in the eye of the beholder. What fits the bill for one might not fit the bill for everyone. Clouding the issue is the fact that, sadly, not everyone loves where they live. Maybe they’re like Cubs fans, so full of hope that they don’t just give up and move…
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The Effects of Disparities and Walkability on Health: A Closer Look ...

The Effects of Disparities and Walkability on Health: A Closer Look ... | Livability | Scoop.it
In the past decade, much research has been published about the affects of socioeconomic imbalances on health and wellness. In observance of National Heart Month, RTC is pleased to present this post by Dr.
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Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built

Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built | Livability | Scoop.it

The cities of the future will have waste-to-energy plants, not shopping malls or churches, at their center, according to urban designer Mitchell Joachim of Terreform ONE. At DLD Cities in London, he said "cities have centers that celebrate previous centuries -- in Europe, the cities celebrated spirituality, with cathedrals. After some time, the cathedrals became downtown cores- and celebrations of capitalism and commercialism". The cities of the future will celebrate "the belief of what keeps us alive" - or elements of the city that make our lives better.

 

Terreform ONE, a green design company in Brooklyn, explores biohacks for the ecological issues facing modern cities. For instance, the waste New York City produces every hour weighs as much as the Statue of Liberty - in the future that waste could be recompacted into building blocks, or recycled "bales". Looking beyond recycling, though, it would be even better to create a city which didn't produce waste in the first place. That means growing thousands of homes -- building a new suburb could involve twisting, pruning and manipulating large trees into the frames of buildings. "There would be no difference between the home and nature -- it would be something that would be a positive addition to the ecology," explained Joachim.

 

For more information on these innovative concepts, including biomimicry and new green technology proposals for future cities, stop by to read the complete article and visit referenced links on urban sustainability.


Via Lauren Moss, Rowan Edwards, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Urban Environment: 8 Qualities of Pedestrian and Transit-Oriented Design

The Urban Environment: 8 Qualities of Pedestrian and Transit-Oriented Design | Livability | Scoop.it

Since 2000, a number of tools for measuring the quality of the walking environment have emerged. These tools are now used by researchers, local governments, and community groups to measure physical features related to walkability, such as building setback, block length, and street and sidewalk width.


Yet individual physical features may not tell us much about the experience of walking down a particular street. Specifically, they may not capture people’s overall perceptions of the street environment, perceptions that may have complex or subtle relationships to physical features. The urban design literature points to numerous perceptual qualities that may affect the walking experience. Other fields also contribute, including architecture, landscape architecture, park planning, environmental psychology, and the growing visual preference and visual assessment literature.

 

Visit the link for more information and the complete article explaining the 8 urban design qualities that enable more effective urban design planning solutions for creating quality pedestrian environments...


Via Lauren Moss
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Anji Connell's curator insight, April 10, 2013 10:40 PM

Fascinating........"Imageability is related to “sense of place.” Gorden Cullen (1961, p. 152) elaborates on the concept of sense of place, asserting that a characteristic visual theme will contribute to a cohesive sense of place and will inspire people to enter and rest in the space. Jan Gehl (1987, p. 183) explains this phenomenon using the example of famous Italian city squares, where “life in the space, the climate, and the architectural quality support and complement each other to create an unforgettable total impression.” When all factors manage to work together to such pleasing ends, a feeling of physical and psychological well-being results: the feeling that a space is a thoroughly pleasant place in which to be."

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Four College Satellite Campuses Energize Their Downtowns | Livability

Four College Satellite Campuses Energize Their Downtowns | Livability | Livability | Scoop.it
Downtown satellite campuses help colleges and cities forge mutually beneficial relationships.
Natasha Lorens's insight:

Innovative colleges are making an impact on downtown areas.

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Best Places For Chocolate Lovers - MakeMyTrip Blog

Best Places For Chocolate Lovers - MakeMyTrip Blog | Livability | Scoop.it
Best Places for Chocolate Lovers. Get your chocolate fix at these awesome destinations around the world! (RT @makemytripcare: Have a sweet tooth? Check out the best places for #chocolate lovers in the world!
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Jeff Speck: America Has So Many Problems. Walkability Solves ...

In the ineffable way of all TED talkers, urban planner Jeff Speck, author of “The Walkable City,” has made a concise, urgent, and oddly charming argument for walkability. In just under 17 minutes, Speck has articulated the ...
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Six things to know about who's moving where - Livability.com Best Places Blog – Livability.com Blog

Mortgage giant Freddie Mac says the typical American will move about 12 times during their lifetime. Here’s what newly-released Census county-to-county migration data tells us about who is doing the moving, where they’re leaving and where they’re headed. 1) The suburbs aren’t quite dead yet. Yes, the downtowns of many of our largest cities are…
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Why Cycle Cities Are the Future

Why Cycle Cities Are the Future | Livability | Scoop.it

The 2010 launch of the “Boris Bike” – London’s cycle hire scheme, was the clearest indication to date that cycling was no longer just for a minority, but a healthy, efficient and sustainable mode of transport that city planners wanted in their armoury.


There are now more than 8,000 Boris Bikes and 550+ docking stations in Central London. And the trend’s not anomalous to London: Wikipedia reports that there are 535 cycle-share schemes in 49 countries, employing more than half a million bikes worldwide.

However, the real question is: will cycling actually change the city?


Via Lauren Moss
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Four Reasons Colleges Make Towns More Livable - Livability.com Best Places Blog – Livability.com Blog

Four Reasons Colleges Make Towns More Livable - Livability.com Best Places Blog – Livability.com Blog | Livability | Scoop.it

 

 

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