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Litteris
New Languages and Readings in Digital Contexts. Novas Linguagens e Leituras em Contextos Digitais.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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From manuscripts to big data

From manuscripts to big data | Litteris | Scoop.it
The global popularity of the Internet and the ready access to information via web searches has led people to expect access to almost any kind of cultural material via a web browser. As  Burnable bo...
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Storytelling: Turning Data Into Effective Stories

Storytelling: Turning Data Into Effective Stories | Litteris | Scoop.it
For years nonprofits have used storytelling as a way to share the impact of their work with donors and the community.  Typically these stories illustrate a specific case of how individuals and comm...

Via Hans Heesterbeek
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Hans Heesterbeek's curator insight, September 2, 2013 5:24 AM

Nice graph, good explaination 

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Orgulho e preconceito: os 200 anos de um livro arrebatador

Orgulho e preconceito: os 200 anos de um livro arrebatador | Litteris | Scoop.it
Era a mais bela capa para o Sul21. Na época, o lay-out de nossa página tinha uma foto grande e a capa do jornal ficara assim por alguns minutos: Só que, justo naquele domingo, houve a tragédia na b...
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Killing the Top Ten Sacred Cows of Publishing | Myth #2: Writing Fast is Bad

Killing the Top Ten Sacred Cows of Publishing | Myth #2: Writing Fast is Bad | Litteris | Scoop.it

Or said in myth fashion: WRITING SLOW EQUALS WRITING WELL.

 

Or the flip side: WRITING FAST EQUALS WRITING POORLY.

 

This comes out of everyone’s mouth at one point or another in a form of apology for our work. “Oh, I just cranked that off.”

 

Or the flip side… “This is some of my best work. I’ve been writing it for over a year.”

 

Now this silly idea that the writing process has anything at all to do with quality of the work has been around in publishing for just over 100 years now, pushed mostly by the literature side and the college professors.

 

It has no basis in any real fact when it comes to writers. None. If you don’t believe me, start researching how fast some of the classics of literature were written.

 

But don’t ask major professional writers out in public. Remember we know this myth and lie about how really hard we do work. (Yup, that’s right, someone who makes stuff up for a living will lie to you. Go figure.) So you have to get a long-term professional writer in a private setting. Then maybe with a few drinks under his belt the pro will tell you the truth about any project.

 

In my Writing in Public posts this year, I am doing my best to knock some of this myth down and just show what a normal day in a life can produce, even with me doing a bunch of other things at the same time.

 

My position:

NO WRITER IS THE SAME. NO PROJECT IS THE SAME.

And put simply:

 

THE QUALITY OF THE FINAL PRODUCT HAS NO RELATIONSHIP TO THE SPEED, METHOD, OR FEELING OF THE WRITER WHILE WRITING.


Via Nathalie Hamidi
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‘Deixo-me apaixonar pelos personagens’, conta Mia Couto

‘Deixo-me apaixonar pelos personagens’, conta Mia Couto | Litteris | Scoop.it
Autor moçambicano é entrevistado, a pedido do GLOBO, por seis autores lusófonos
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Visual storytelling through animated gifs and Vine - @martin_kelley

Visual storytelling through animated gifs and Vine - @martin_kelley | Litteris | Scoop.it
NPR’s Planet Money recently ran an arti­cle on glass recy­cling, How A Used Bot­tle Becomes A New Bot­tle, In 6 Gifs. The Gif part is what intrigued me.
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Grandes Livros

Grandes Livros | Litteris | Scoop.it
Grandes Livros é uma série de documentários, com episódios de aprox. 50 minutos, que pretende contribuir com a promoção da leitura das grandes obras da liter...
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Orgulho e Preconceito (Jane Austen)

Orgulho e Preconceito é um romance da escritora britânica Jane Austen. Publicado pela primeira vez em 1813. A história mostra a maneira com que a personagem ...
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13 Clichés You Shouldn't Be Caught Dead Using

13 Clichés You Shouldn't Be Caught Dead Using | Litteris | Scoop.it
Clichés are the worst. Aside from being indicative of lazy speaking and lazy writing, they are rarely used correctly, and even when they are, they rarely make sense.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 27, 2013 3:15 PM

I've always had mixed feelings about this particularly common "English Teachery" advise. Not because I don't agree that metaphor can become cliché, but because for many students, metaphor at the clichè level is one of the earliest expressions of "intrinsic appreciation" of metaphor and descriptive writing. 

 

But rather than phrase the advise in a way that sounds more like, "What you did is bad writing" I would prefer to recognize the use of clichès as more of an admirable beginning of a transition from merely a literal expression towards a more image driven "show don't tell" expression.

 

No. They're not good metaphors because they are clichès. But, they may be indicators of a growing awareness of the power of imagery in writing. 

 

I think it gets down to how we communicate to students. If their first impression of 'how" we respond to the use of clichès is, "My teacher didn't like it when I tried to use metaphors" then we may be perceived as having been disappointed. And, students may jump to the discouraging conclusion, false as it may be, that if they can't come of with a metaphor that has never been used before, they will be criticized for using previously used metaphors.

 

Yet, if we can manage to remember that the use of metaphor, whether clichè or not, may actually be a relatively "fresh concept" for many students and then craft our response to recognize the use of metaphor as a good thing. And, perhaps, leaving the discussion about the downside of using metaphors that are used too frequently for a secondary opportunity to write even better metaphors, Kids who might have been discouraged by our hauling out the over-used "Clichès are bad" rubber stamp we might intrigue students and encourage them to continue to evolve their appreciation for figurative language.

 

But OK. I'll confess. this article isn't really about using clichès so much as it is about what makes the worst of them so bad. Those on the list are bad not only because they're overused, but also because they are for the most part outdated. They lack the real power of metaphor because they no longer bring to mind a mental image that makes any sense any more (if they ever did).

 

I would agree that we ought to avoid clichès that have lost the power to create an image we can relate to. I would agree that other clichès may still work, but really aren't all that interesting. I might point out to students that these sorts of clichès bare a striking similarity to bygone slang their parents may still use. And, I might even attempt to exemplify the "better metaphors" as being sort of like hearing a great joke for the first time compared to having someone run up to them and telling a joke he or she thinks is hilarious, yet having already heard the joke "a million times before" it just isn't all that interesting anymore.

 

So my last thought...

 

What do you think of the use of "shouldn't get caught dead using" being used in the headline for this article?

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

 

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10 Brainy Tips for Hooking Your Reader

Brain science explains why readers keep reading.

Via IBooks Author
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IBooks Author's curator insight, August 27, 2013 4:08 PM

Wired for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence

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Morte e Vida Severina em Desenho Animado

Direção Afonso Serpa Produção Executiva Mario Lellis Roger Burdino Maurício Fonteles Direção de Produção Alexandre Fischgold Roteiro Afonso Serpa Assistente ...
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Viver de literatura

Premiado autor de “Eles eram muitos cavalos” vê uma escrita mais profissional e viável, apesar das mazelas da educação e do “amadorismo editorial”
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E-Books Could Be The Future Of Social Media

E-Books Could Be The Future Of Social Media | Litteris | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Dorothea Martin's curator insight, September 3, 2013 3:10 AM

Readmill, the social reading experience and book marketing on a whole new level:

“We thought that there was a huge potential in taking what Goodreads had done on social on the web for books, but doing that for a mobile integrated reading experience,” says Berggren. “So instead of having to read your book and then think, ‘Okay, now I have to go to Goodreads, find it there, add it to my profile, and write my review,’ we just wanted to let you share and review from inside of the book.”

“Authors and publishers get access to a dashboard where they can see the engagement matrix of a specific book and see how many people that start reading the book actually finish it, how long it takes, if they recommended it to friends, and how much they shared throughout that experience,” explains Berggren.

According to Berggren, modern publishers miss a lot of marketing opportunities for their authors because they don’t know where or when to target their marketing efforts. "

 

Carol Koechlin's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:37 AM

Books of all kinds are often best when shared and enriched by discussions with others. Social media will make that experience available to everyone. There is great potential here for improved literacy on a global scale.

gillkelley's curator insight, September 4, 2013 6:43 AM

An interesting perspective on the future of social media marketing.

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Ebooks Breathe New Life Into Novellas

Ebooks Breathe New Life Into Novellas | Litteris | Scoop.it
Many of the most loved, famous and influential books in modern history have been novellas. Are ebooks and Kindle Singles prompting a revival of mid-length fiction?
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Michael Lewis on Writing, Money, and the Necessary Self-Delusion of Creativity

Michael Lewis on Writing, Money, and the Necessary Self-Delusion of Creativity | Litteris | Scoop.it
"When you’re trying to create a career as a writer, a little delusional thinking goes a long way."

The question of why writers write ho

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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What Factors Keep Kids From Being Avid Readers? « Evanced

"Why is it that reading engagement drops off so significantly by the time students enter high school?"


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Joan Vinall-Cox
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:40 AM

We've all heard it...

 

"I hate reading."

 

"I'm no good at math!"

 

I've even heard an English teacher "consoling" a student by saying, "That's okay. I never liked math either."

 

Arghh!

 

I was intrigued by two aspects of this article. The first being the emphasis on the self-fulling prophesy aspect of the students themselves who gradually see failure to succeed as reason to quit trying. Why? because failure is embarrassing.

 

As the author puts it...

 

_______________

 

"To put it simply,over time kids get used to failure and stop trying. Reading proves too difficult to endure the embarrassment of failure and not enough fun to make it worth the effort."

_______________

 

There are certainly other aspects of the story worth serious consideration. How is it that failure has become embarrassing? 

 

In many children's minds, failure = "I'm stupid."

 

And anyone who has taught in grades where this downward momentum becomes apparent, has also seen the withdrawal from friendships with those who appear to be "smart" and the attraction to friends of what appear to be similarly fatalistic attitudes. 

 

As the author puts it...

 

_______________

 

"These beliefs are infectious."

_______________

 

Students in an attempt to escape the pain of embarrassment may well seek new social groups where failure is accepted; not because failure has an upside, but because a sort of callousness to the pain is better than the pain. And, then the "I don't care" factor can become the only perceived antidote. And, then in a sad irony, the new embarrassment among those friends who have found relief in not caring is to care. And then a whole new embarrassment arises from those who would mercilessly tease the kid who might see some reason to give trying another shot.

 

The second aspect of the article that I found fascinating is that all cited references are "old" in terms of research based upon "currency;" the most recent reference being 15 years old and the oldest being 19 years old.

 

I'm just wondering whether things have changed sufficiently that the points being made here are no longer as relevant as they once might have been. Or, whether things have not changed enough in spite of the attention being given to improving education over the last 15-20 years.

 

That's a tricky question certainly. It's more Yin & Yang than true or false. So, the questions are, "What classroom practices have proven to be effective in countering the downward trajectory in interest in reading among middle and high school students?" And, "What classroom practices, though perhaps well-intended, contribute to the decline?"

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

"Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name fore GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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'Social Fiction' Brings Characters to Life via Facebook and Twitter

'Social Fiction' Brings Characters to Life via Facebook and Twitter | Litteris | Scoop.it
A former Nickelodeon animator and a Facebook employee teamed up to create social fiction in Hawk Funn, a story told via Facebook, Twitter and the Internet.
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Cómo escribir un cuento: 10 Consejos de Julio Cortázar para escribir un cuento

Cómo escribir un cuento: 10 Consejos de Julio Cortázar para escribir un cuento | Litteris | Scoop.it

Via Silvan Pan Morel
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Teste: que livro você é? – Educar para Crescer

Teste: que livro você é? – Educar para Crescer | Litteris | Scoop.it
Teste para o leitor descobrir com que livro ele se parece.
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E-books 'much more accessible' for blind people | The Bookseller

E-books 'much more accessible' for blind people | The Bookseller | Litteris | Scoop.it
Book Publishing Industry News. Regular news updates from The Bookseller's news desk. The latest press reports about the publishing sector and updates from the City
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Captain Picard's Words of Wisdom

after demonizing Picard in my Tng Recuts I felt obligated to dedicate a video to the real Picard, who is the most moral and admirable character ever

Via Anita
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Anita's curator insight, August 27, 2013 4:04 PM

Wisdom from Star Trek.

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Attract More Readers By Writing Posts They Already Crave -

Attract More Readers By Writing Posts They Already Crave - | Litteris | Scoop.it

Via Beth Kanter
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Beth Kanter's curator insight, August 27, 2013 7:54 PM

Some terrific tips and techniques for coming up with ideas for your content strategy.  

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HD: Teaser de "Divergente [Legendado PT-BR]

http://divergentebrasil.com/primeiro-teaser-de-divergente-e-revelado-no-vma-2013/ Para ativar a legenda cliquem em "ATIVAR LEGENDAS" no "CC". @DivergenteBR ...
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