Litteris
8.2K views | +2 today
Follow
Litteris
Reading and Writing in Digital Contexts. Leitura e produção textual em contextos digitais
Curated by Luciana Viter
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Stories - an experience for your audience -
Scoop.it!

The One Best Storytelling Tip

The One Best Storytelling Tip | Litteris | Scoop.it

The very best tip I’ve ever seen for good storytelling I wholeheartedly believe to be true. If you want to be a good writer and storyteller …read. I saw that admonition again most recently in my fourth time through “On Writing” by Stephen King.


Via Hans Heesterbeek
more...
Peter Fruhmann's curator insight, February 12, 2013 6:08 AM

Good article! Don't think too much of methods or rigid structures. Next to reading I would say: tell stories! Practice, practice, practice and you will find out what works and what not, which stories 'belong' to you and which not. Tell your children stores, try to make up stories for them by yourself (make them the hero in the stories). I can recommend that, they are a grateful (and critical!) audience if you want to learn to tell a compelling story...

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Learning skills and literacies
Scoop.it!

Is a second grade student’s silent reading comprehension affected by the use of electronic texts?

"The results of this study demonstrated no significant statistical difference between the comprehension of students using the iPad and those reading from a printed text. However, surveys and observations demonstrated an increase in engagement when using the electronic reader in the classroom."
Via Rosa Martins, Anu Ojaranta, Eeva Kurttila-Matero
more...
Eeva Kurttila-Matero's comment, November 26, 2012 1:49 AM
Thanks, Anu!
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

# the still point of the turning world (part 1)

# the still point of the turning world (part 1) | Litteris | Scoop.it
” Whenever the net absorbs a medium, it re-creates that medium in its own image. In not only dissolves the mediums physical form; it injects the mediums content with hyperlinks, breaks up the...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Hybrid Pedagogy Reading List
Scoop.it!

In a digital world, what is the right kind of reading?

In a digital world, what is the right kind of reading? | Litteris | Scoop.it
My students prefer to dip and sample, and I’m becoming okay with that...
Via Hybrid Pedagogy
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Data Security
Scoop.it!

The Masquerade Crew: The Real Reason Writers Need To Read

The Masquerade Crew: The Real Reason Writers Need To Read | Litteris | Scoop.it

There’s a specific skill you gain from reading widely — not just the stuff you like — that is an essential tool to becoming a better writer. 


Via Ed Stenson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

10 Infographics on Books and Reading | EcoSalon | Conscious Culture and Fashion

10 Infographics on Books and Reading | EcoSalon | Conscious Culture and Fashion | Litteris | Scoop.it
It is an incredible accomplishment of democracy that nearly everyone in the United States is literate and has access to free books. Take a look at these ten infographics and then jet to your local library.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Ideias
Scoop.it!

Donald Clark Plan B: Manuscripts and the collapse of learning

Donald Clark Plan B: Manuscripts and the collapse of learning | Litteris | Scoop.it

Via Maria Margarida Correia
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

What’s Wrong With Reading? - Anthony Turner

What’s Wrong With Reading? - Anthony Turner | Litteris | Scoop.it
Anthony is teased when his classmates catch him reading a book for fun, but he refuses to change his ways. In fact, he argues that his peers should read more, not less.

 

 

 

 

__________

Our colleagues doing good work in the field of basic literacy are making slow but steady progress. But, a much less attended to issue is that of students who can read but who don't read.

 

Learning the skills associated with decoding is certainly a first step. However, evidence is mounting that while literacy rates are climbing, literary reading rates are declining. 

 

This video and article address ONE of the critical elephants in the room. Are we adequately addressing the forces at play in obstructing interest in using those literacy skills.

 

The video shares one of those forces, peer pressure. The video even suggests that this peer pressure exists at a cultural level. That is dangerous territory. The kids in this video, in any case, are making heroic efforts at resisting such pressure.

 

But there is ANOTHER ELEPHANT in the room as well. One that our profession might have more influence over. 

 

In what ways are we making reading an attractive experience, particularly for our kids who have not yet found reading to be attractive?

 

Are our "required" reading lists representative of all our students' potential engagement points. Or, are they "one size fits all"? Or, "one size plus lip-service fits all"? 

 

The kids in the video recognize themselves in the books they are heroically defending and enjoying in spite of the peer pressure. They see not only themselves, but more about themselves, their history, and their culture than they had previously recognized as relevant and therefore interesting. 

 

The young man who "discovers" Langston Hughes built a bridge from his less expansive zone of proximal learning to a larger more inclusive zone of proximal learning because he saw and discovered a relevance to the world he knew. 

 

As a profession we may or may not have sufficient influence to address the peer pressure issue SUCCESSFULLY. It is a form of bullying which happens to be getting an increased recognition in today's educational conversations. And, those addressing the issue of bullying are taking on a mighty task.

 

But there are a few things we can do. We can build in opportunities for reluctant students to find more directly relevant titles to read. We need not necessarily replace the "more remotely relevant titles" but for many reluctant readers, the bridge to titles from the traditional literary canon may be a fairly long bridge to cross. When young readers' zones of proximal development are separated by centuries, extremely sophisticated AND outmoded sentence structures, distant and often outmoded vocabulary, and cultural distances there are significant challenges for which even greater heroic efforts on the part of the student may be required.

 

Yet, we all know that much of that canon is on the list because it represents works of great and universal relevance. We also know that any kid is capable of being "hooked" by engaging learning activities. And, that is a key to our opportunity we must design learning activities that ARE engaging.

 

Teaching great literature as though its primary value is passing a test, or getting into college or as though our primary purpose is to create the next generation of English majors may be an elephant in the faculty room that we might want to take a look at. 

 

I've been wondering about the hierarchy of importance and value of teaching literary reading. I might list them as follows:

 

MOST IMPORTANT: Basic Literacy. Without Basic Literacy literary reading can not be done and therefore can have "almost" no value. Exceptions might include audio alternatives. That is, pre-readers are read too and thus begin to appreciate good story telling as a means towards considering valuable life skills and universal themes.

 

I would suggest that this is essential for 100% of students world-wide.

 

NEXT MOST IMPORTANT: Developing a continuing engagement with literary reading. The engagement must as soon as possible be reader-centric rather than "teacher imposed." Though Imposed reading runs the risk of being disengaging if not done well, it also can lead to engagement that young readers might not have reached without the well-crafted learning activities of an excellent teacher (or parent or other engaged reader who has taken a caring interest in the young reader)

 

Though not an essential value for 100% of our students in the long run, it is extremely beneficial for 100% of them should they become ongoing engaged literary readers.

 

This is a conclusion I don't particularly like to concede, but one need simply look around and see that the values of literary reading can be found elsewhere. Learning the great QUESTIONS of living one's life successfully are available via most faith-based experiences, as well as via great non-literary writings found in psychology, philosophy, history and even business as well as other sources. And in non-writing based sources such as scout masters, Aunts, uncles, and others who take the time to be cherished advisors. Even film, though most film adaptations of great literature fall painfully short. While a portion of that pain is more acute for the English majors than for non English majors, they typically are not, with good reason, considered adequate alternatives to the written original. But, keep in mind, Shakespeare never wanted his plays read; he never even bothered to have them published. Yet we can assume that his audiences might well have been lead to contemplate the very same universal truths we hope today's readers might be lead to contemplate when reading Shakespeare. And, there are many films not based upon a literary piece, that are available only in a visual media, that reach the same universal themes as the best of written literature and often in quite engaging ways.

 

THE THIRD MOST IMPORTANT is perhaps the LEAST IMPORTANT and perhaps the bitterest pill to swallow: Scholarly Reading.  Let's face it. We're all scholars at heart. We wouldn't have earned the required degrees to teach without having been so. And, there's not one of us who hasn't or won't collect a long list of former students for whom we burst with pride upon discovering that we played some role in their choosing to major in English and perhaps even to choose the noblest profession of all as a result to some degree of our influence. But, let's face it scholarly reading is not going to be a part of most of our students' futures. And, overemphasizing the merits of scholarly reading may in fact be counter-productive when students are transitioning from non-readers to engaged readers. Excessive attention to academic minutae directed at reluctant readers and casual readers may be reasons for premature disengagement. 

 

It's a very delicate line between helping students tune in to the magic of a well-turned extended metaphor or helping them learn to catch elements of finely intertwined themes in order further their appreciation and engagement with literary reading and overloading them prematurely with excessive and often distracting attenion to all that "scholarly stuff" we were receptive to in graduate school primarily because we had already long committed ourselves to a life-long engagement with literary reading.

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
Kevin Alexander's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:45 PM

When I was younger I was often teased for reading by my friends as well. However, reading is the foundation for everything. 

Jefferson Hall IV's curator insight, September 10, 2015 11:07 PM

This article really resonates with me because it entails changing the stigma of young black kids dumbing themselves down. This piece aims to change the way kids react to other their peers reading books especially in the young black community. It seems reading automatically generalizing oneself into being a nerd has been a social precedent. After reading Anthony Turner’s words on the subject I began to find hope that this will change. Reading can be very beneficial to the young black community. This education found through reading can help get more black scholars to college and off the streets. I hope to see/hear about more children defying the social construct around them by picking up a book and reading them proudly.

Turner may not be a critically acclaimed writer or have won any awards for his work…yet. In my opinion, this article should still be ruled credible because he is there with his boots on the ground actually fighting the good fight. He has a firsthand perspective allowing him to report the truth he sees, thus making him credible.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from A Writer's Notebook
Scoop.it!

Great Writers: Inspirational literature from the University of Oxford

Great Writers: Inspirational literature from the University of Oxford | Litteris | Scoop.it

Great Writers Inspire; explore the material to find out why. This significant collection contains inspirational lectures, talks, ebooks, and contextual material freely available to the public and the education community worldwide. Some of these Open Educational Resources are collected together by theme and writers, and much more is available within the virtual shelves of the Library. Thousands of literature resources can be discovered for the benefit of teaching and learning everywhere. See how great writers can inspire you.


Via elearning hoje
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Era Digital - um olhar ciberantropológico
Scoop.it!

Palestra Dr. James Paul Gee

Palestrante James Paul Gee Imagens Kid´s Story by Shinichiro Watanabe The Second Renaissan by Mahiro Maeda Matriculated by Peter Chung Música In the flesh by…...
Via Adelina Silva
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Educación 2.0
Scoop.it!

Aplicación para desarrollar y mejorar la velocidad lectora

Aplicación para desarrollar y mejorar la velocidad lectora | Litteris | Scoop.it

Cualquier persona puede perfeccionar su capacidad lectora. Puede multiplicar por 2, 3 ó 4 su velocidad habitual sin menoscabo alguno de su capacidad de de comprensión y asimilación

Aunque muchos no lo creen, hay experimentos que demuestran que los lectores rápidos son los que mejor captan el sentido de lo leído, ya que puede hacerse con las relaciones internas del texto y con las particularidades de su estructura en un período de tiempo más breve. 

Esta aplicación va dirigida a la mejora de la velocidad lectora de personas de cualquier edad siempre que tenga una velocidad de lectura mínima de 80 palabras por minuto aproximadamente.


Via Raúl Luna
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Books On Books
Scoop.it!

elearn Magazine: Moving From Paper to E-Book Reading

elearn Magazine: Moving From Paper to E-Book Reading | Litteris | Scoop.it
When I was 10, back in the analog and paper book age, my Grandmother delighted me by giving me a copy of Lucy Maud Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables. I read it repeatedly and left tearstains on the s...
Via Robert Bolick
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Formar lectores en un mundo visual
Scoop.it!

¿Qué es primero, el libro o el lector? ¿Existe la predestinación literaria? | Pijamasurf

¿Qué es primero, el libro o el lector? ¿Existe la predestinación literaria? | Pijamasurf | Litteris | Scoop.it
¿Los lectores de determinados libros o autores existen incluso antes de encontrarse con estos? ¿Hay factores de personalidad, de comportamiento, de contexto social, que nos encaminan inevitablemente a ciertas lecturas?

Via Alfonso Noriega
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Read Quick Helps You Improve Your Reading Speed

Read Quick Helps You Improve Your Reading Speed | Litteris | Scoop.it
Want to improve your own reading speed, but still be able to understand everything? This app can help you out with that.

Via Jon Samuelson, John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century Literacy and Learning
Scoop.it!

Webinar: Writing and Writing Instruction to Improve Reading: What We Have Learned from Research

Webinar: Writing and Writing Instruction to Improve Reading: What We Have Learned from Research | Litteris | Scoop.it

Webinar: Writing and Writing Instruction to Improve Reading: What We Have Learned from Research Sponsored by Center on Instruction Published: 4/22/2011 11:06 AM The Center on Instruction hosted a webinar on April 21, 2011, featuring Dr. Steve Graham, co-author of "Writing to Read", a meta-analysis that examines the influence of writing on reading skills. He presented an overview of the findings and described implications for practice. He also provided specific examples of how writing facilitates reading and reading development. The archived WebEx file can be accessed here. The PowerPoint presentation used during the webinar and a synopsis of the report is available for download below, and the full report can be accessed here.

This webinar provides support in the alignment of instruction for schools that are implementing School Improvement Grants (SIG) and/or the College & Career Ready Standards (including Common Core State Standards).
Files available for this event: 156.95 KB PPT: Writing and Writing Instruction Improve Reading: What We Have Learned from Research 179.24 KB Synopsis of "Writing to Read: Evidence for How Writing Can Improve Reading"


Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Les Howard
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Comprensió escrita
Scoop.it!

Evaluación de La comprensión lectora

La evaluación de la comprensión lectora Dr. José A. Rivera Jiménez


Via Josep M. Domingo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Once Upon a Time
Scoop.it!

Brain Scans Predict Reading Ability - Patch.com

Brain Scans Predict Reading Ability - Patch.com | Litteris | Scoop.it

If a 7-year-old is breezing through the "Harry Potter" books, studies indicate that he or she will be a strong reader later in life.


Via Ms Webster
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

The Paradox of Book Reading and Why Culture Is a Matter of Orientation

The Paradox of Book Reading and Why Culture Is a Matter of Orientation | Litteris | Scoop.it


Robin Good: The excellent and insightful Maria Popova has really got me fascinated with this piece she wrote back in June of this year. Entitled "How To Talk About Books You Haven’t Read", this writing, inspired by a book by the same name, is good food for thought as it stretches ordinary assumptions about what culture and book readings is in the end all about.


As curation is an effort in meaning creation and discovery, exploring different ways to look at how we build our picture of reality and what role books play into this process is, from my personal viewpoint, a very valuable effort.


In the end, you may likely disagree with the overall logic but personally, I have found this mental stretching exercise quite valuable and I am thankful to both Maria and the author for making it possible for me to poke with it: "The paradox of reading is that the path toward ourselves passes through books, but that this must remain a passage..."


The challenging questions being posed is: "Must we read those from cover to cover in order to be complete, cultured individuals?" and some interesting answers come from the book author himself,  University of Paris literature professor Pierre Bayard, who offers "a compelling meditation on this taboo subject that makes a case for reading not as a categorical dichotomy but as a spectrum of engaging with literature in various ways, along different dimensions".


Prof Bayard writes: "As cultivated people know (and, to their misfortune, uncultivated people do not), culture is above all a matter of orientation. Being cultivated is a matter not of having read any book in particular, but of being able to find your bearings within books as a system, which requires you to know that they form a system and to be able to locate each element in relation to the others."


Maria Popova further synthesizes his thought by writing: "Literature becomes not a container of absolute knowledge but a compass for orienteering ourselves to and in the world and its different contexts, books become not isolated objects but a system of relational understanding...".


Insightful. Thoughful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/06/15/how-to-talk-about-books-you-havent-read/




Via Robin Good
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

So Many Books, So Little Time

So Many Books, So Little Time | Litteris | Scoop.it
“So many books, so little time,” is the common lament of book readers and compulsive book buyers like myself who snap up paperbacks like this discarded library copy for 50...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Pobre Gutenberg
Scoop.it!

Printed books or e-books? What is the future of reading?

Printed books or e-books? What is the future of reading? | Litteris | Scoop.it

"All points are good ones, but one walks away with the feeling that the some people think the issue is a dilemma that will only be resolved with the disappearance of print or with the relegation of e-book readers to the trashpile of faddish gadgets like the Walkman or the 8-Track Tape Player."


Via booqlab
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Futurity.org – MRI reveals brain’s response to reading

Futurity.org – MRI reveals brain’s response to reading | Litteris | Scoop.it
Research news from leading universities...

The researchers expected to see pleasure centers activating for the relaxed reading and hypothesized that close reading, as a form of heightened attention, would create more neural activity than pleasure reading.
If the ongoing analysis continues to support the initial theory, Phillips says, teaching close reading (i.e., attention to literary form) “could serve—quite literally—as a kind of cognitive training, teaching us to modulate our concentration and use new brain regions as we move flexibly between modes of focus.”
With the field of literary neuroscience in its infancy, Phillips says this project is helping to demonstrate the potential that neuroscientific tools have to “give us a bigger, richer picture of how our minds engage with art—or, in our case, of the complex experience we know as literary reading.”


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Reading Matters
Scoop.it!

Sue Atkins on Back to School Reading Habits

Sue Atkins on Back to School Reading Habits | Litteris | Scoop.it

establishing good reading habits at the start of the school year


Via Leanne Windsor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Educación y TIC
Scoop.it!

9 sugerencias para fomentar el hábito a la lectura de los más pequeños.-

9 sugerencias para fomentar el hábito a la lectura de los más pequeños.- | Litteris | Scoop.it
A muchos padres nos gustaría que nuestros hijos pasaran un rato leyendo en vez de estar todo el día enganchados a la tele o a los videojuegos y en este empeño hacemos que incluso se produzca el efecto contrario al deseado, que el niño aborrezca o le parezca aburrida la lectura. Y es que, obligar al niño a leer, hacerle preguntas después sobre lo que ha leído como si fueran deberes del colegio, no dejarle elegir sus lecturas o reñirle por estar viendo la tele en vez de leer un libro, pueden hacer que el niño asocie la lectura a otra tarea escolar o a algo aburrido. En este artículo vamos a ver algunas de las cosas que podemos hacer para fomentar el hábito a la lectura de nuestros hijos y para que la vean como una actividad entretenida y placentera.
Via Mauricio M. Escudero, Mariano Fernandez S.
more...
No comment yet.