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Prithee, thou should read more Shakespeare to improve thine brain - msnNOW

Prithee, thou should read more Shakespeare to improve thine brain - msnNOW | Litteris | Scoop.it


Reading the old-school stuff caused a higher degree of electrical activity in the brain, particularly in areas associated with self-reflection, according to a recent study.


Via Suzanne Hamilton
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Litteris
New Languages and Readings in Digital Contexts. Novas Linguagens e Leituras em Contextos Digitais.
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Apple is Dominating The eBook Market on iOS

Apple is Dominating The eBook Market on iOS | Litteris | Scoop.it

Apple is currently dominating eBook sales on iOS and has now bundled their iBookstore on all devices that run iOS 8. The Capturino company has relegated Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Kobo to being ineffective players on the global stage, and its by design.


Via booqlab, Andoni Sagarna Izagirre, Carlos Pinheiro
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Video in Enhanced Ebooks: How? Why?

Video in Enhanced Ebooks: How? Why? | Litteris | Scoop.it
Enhanced ebooks have been a cause of much excitement over the past few years -- and with good reason. One of the things that an ebook can do that a paper-and-ink book can't is to add embedded video and sound....

Via Sara Rosett
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San Antonio International Airport Unveils Free eBook Terminal

San Antonio International Airport Unveils Free eBook Terminal | Litteris | Scoop.it
If you are passing through the San Antonio International Airport you can now borrow eBooks for free. Two Digital Library kiosks have been installed by

Via Sara Rosett
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Sara Rosett's curator insight, October 24, 9:46 PM

Need one of these at EWR! 

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6 técnicas para conseguir títulos 100% explosivos

6 técnicas para conseguir títulos 100% explosivos | Litteris | Scoop.it
¿Te gustaría crear el titular perfecto con el que atraer a los lectores que te interesa?

Via Angel Acción Lamas
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Writing in Deep POV

Writing in Deep POV | Litteris | Scoop.it
Deep POV brings your reader and your character closer together. Learn one surefire technique to go deep and bridge the gap.
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How To Exercise Your Creative Muscle - Fast Company

How To Exercise Your Creative Muscle - Fast Company | Litteris | Scoop.it
The key to coming up with big ideas at work might be to let your creative side play in the off hours.

Via Creativity For Life
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Frank Cottrell Boyce: excessive analysis of books puts kids off reading

Frank Cottrell Boyce: excessive analysis of books puts kids off reading | Litteris | Scoop.it
Writer to use David Fickling lecture to argue that some teaching methods promoting literacy are polluting the reading experience
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iBooks Author Gains New Import Options - TidBITS

iBooks Author Gains New Import Options - TidBITS | Litteris | Scoop.it
Joining the other updates pouring from Apple’s servers recently is one for iBooks Author 2.2, which brings some new templates, the capability to import from EPUBs, and a collection of other enhancements to the ebook authoring software.

Via Peter Pappas, Juergen Wagner
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Peter Pappas's curator insight, October 19, 1:48 PM

Best review to date of the iBA 2.2 update

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Com novos aplicativos, audiolivro tenta se reinventar no Brasil

Com novos aplicativos, audiolivro tenta se reinventar no Brasil | Litteris | Scoop.it
Formato busca segunda chance no mercado, após fracassadas tentativas com fitas cassetes e CDs
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From TV to Books: How Movies and TV Shows Bring in a New Reading Audience! | The Hub

From TV to Books: How Movies and TV Shows Bring in a New Reading Audience! | The Hub | Litteris | Scoop.it

Via BJ Neary
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BJ Neary's curator insight, October 16, 7:58 PM

If it will lead to reading, watch the movie:)

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Ghosts in the machine: how AI research is bringing game characters to life

Ghosts in the machine: how AI research is bringing game characters to life | Litteris | Scoop.it
In an era of crowd-sourced machine intelligence, games may be about to do what authors have been trying to do for centuries
The ambition to create real, believable characters has been a cornerstone of literature since the 19th century.

Via Monica S Mcfeeters
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Conheça as rotinas criativas dos grandes escritores

Conheça as rotinas criativas dos grandes escritores | Litteris | Scoop.it
Os hábitos diários de escritores e artistas famosos podem ser um indicativo de disciplinas criativas, ritmos de vida literária, procedimentos de trabalho artístico
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Niños, libros y animación a la lectura

Niños, libros y animación a la lectura | Litteris | Scoop.it

En el mundo educativo está todo el mundo "loco" por fomentar la lectura y animar a los niños a leer. Reflexiones sobre cómo animamos a los niños a leer.


Via Kepa Osoro Iturbe, jjpinel, Alfonso Noriega
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Ebooks & digital reading
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Do Readers Really Prefer Their Dusty Old Paperbacks To E-Books? The E-Book Industry By The Numbers [Infographic]

Do Readers Really Prefer Their Dusty Old Paperbacks To E-Books? The E-Book Industry By The Numbers [Infographic] | Litteris | Scoop.it

“ Today, 23 percent of all male adults and 33 percent of all female adults in the United States read e-books. In fact, the global e-book industry is worth a whopping $8.5 billion. This still pales in comparison to global print's $53.9 billion so it's little surprise readers still prefer holding those [...]”


Via Vincent Demuliere, Carlos Pinheiro
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Vincent Demuliere's curator insight, October 28, 6:07 AM
Intéressante infographie...
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The Hemingwrite is a distraction-free, 21st century typewriter

The Hemingwrite is a distraction-free, 21st century typewriter | Litteris | Scoop.it
Before computers became cheap and commonplace, offices around the world were filled with the sound of typewriters. But today the typewriter is all but dead, and for good reason. They were heavy, cumbersome [...]

Via Official AndreasCY
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Official AndreasCY's curator insight, October 25, 4:06 PM

Can't write for more than a minute without checking your email or hearing a Facebook alert? This is the tool for you.

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29 Moments Any Librarian Knows Too Well

29 Moments Any Librarian Knows Too Well | Litteris | Scoop.it
"I'm looking for this book, I forget the title, but there's a dog on the cover...?"

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6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better

6 Reasons Why Print Books Will Always Be Better | Litteris | Scoop.it
Surprise, surprise. Literary writers prefer print....

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Sue Ward
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 23, 1:23 PM

23 August 2014

 

One simple question. Would you consider using this article in class as an excellent example of "Informational Reading"?

 

I might, but not for the reasons you might expect.

 

__________

A PREFACE:  A clarification. It is not my intent to counter the pro-print and anti-E-book positions taken in this article. My intent is to call into question the tact taken by the article's writer (henceforth referencing the writer of the article in order to distinguish the article's author from the book authors referenced in the article).Had the author used the same tact, with the exception of presenting only evidence gleaned from pro-eBook writers, I would certainly have had as much to be concerned about  regarding its lack of balance.

__________

 

I might use this article as an exercise in determining when "informational reading represents an example of a writer being informed, misinformed, disinformed, or ill-informed.

 

My intent was to reference the writer of the article, however I suppose that it might also reference the authors who are the subject of the article as well.

 

My concerns...

 • The article's title is misleading. I had hoped that the writer might be writing an article representing a cross-section of authors who have preferences for reading traditional print or E-Books. 

 

__________

AN INTERESTING SIDEBAR: The previous comment refers to the title on the article as it was published on The Huffington Post (Click to the article above to see for yourself). When "scooped" for this blog, the title mysteriously changed to "6 Reasons why Print Books Will Always be Better." Having done my fair share of print production, I know that headlines are generally not the work of an article's author, but rather the product of the page layout person. The headline as published on The Huffington Post is misleading; the headline that appears at the top of this blog is at least more honest in that it does not hide the writer's bias.

__________

 

I've long had concerns about teachers who express to their students a preference (or skeptical opinion) of either format. Well intended as it may be, it is a personal opinion being passed off as an informed opinion. And, we live in a world where many, if not most, students from every ability level are still too often focused upon reflecting what they believe to be what the teacher wants them to believe, whether they do or not, is going to be on the test (or appreciated by the person who will eventually be handing out grades). Those who prefer "the other" media for their reading may well come to one of two conclusions; either perceiving themselves as in a minority of those "less respected" by the teacher or, in a class with a clueless teacher. This is disturbing in light of our goal of encouraging all students to value the wisdom articulated in great works of literature.

 

 • The writer then begins by clarifying the fact that the authors of whom she writes all share a particular grudge against Amazon, the major distributor of digital text. Their grudge, which may well be justified, is primarily based upon Amazon's policy of not making available books written by authors whose works are also sold by Amazon's primary competitor, Hachette. I suppose this is a reasonable concern since the  Amazon policy does punish the authors by reducing the distribution of their work. The authors become the rope being dragged through the mud in the tug-o-war between two corporations. So, unfair as it appears to be, the question is can authors be unbiased when asked about their preferences for reading media? I don't know. 

 

 • In spite of the headline's appearance of an implied promise to be fair and balanced, the writer clarifies in bold, but buried, text that her article will only represent authors who favor traditional print over digital media. 

 

Those authors articulate the traditional arguments in favor of traditional print, many of which are reasons that my own reading habits sometimes includes traditional print. I do love the ambiance that the wall of books in my den brings to the room. I do appreciate the feel of a book in my hands, the smell of an old book as I read an old classic. I like the "lendability" of printed books, (though I suppose that isn't a preference for many authors who would rather every reader by his or her own copy).

 

 • Another concern is that there is a common "jump to the conclusion" that authors have some special expertise on the subject. 

 

They may have some degree of expertise on quality of an author's writing. Though examples of famous author's distaste for other famous authors abound. (see: The 30 Harshest author on author insults in History: http://flavorwire.com/188138/the-30-harshest-author-on-author-insults-in-history)

 

It's pretty clear to anyone who happens to prefer E-Book reading that some of these authors are in fact ill -informed or inadequately experienced about reading E-Books. 

 

For example, like Lev Grossman, I too want to leave my kids a roomful of books, but reducing the act of reading E-books to "a chunk of plastic that they (the kids) have to guess the password to" would not pass muster in my class for representing an argument objectively. 

And, I don't even get the intent of his quoting Maurice Sendak's suggestion that there is a parallel between reading books and sex having only one kind PERIOD. Absurd. One of the most exciting trends in creating reading materials is the exploration being done by authors of many new concepts in packaging books.

 

Emma Straub, begins with her confession that she's never read an e-book. Well, I'd rather hear the opinions of authors who have invested time in learning a bit about the subject they have taken a very strong opinion about. I do agree with her that I don't find reading on my phone to be a preferable mode of reading. But, to suggest that reading on a phone is a counter argument of much value, in spite of the distinct differences between reading e-books on a phone and reading e-books on other devices. 

 

Anthony Doerr. If you feel that way, fine. Sometimes I have similar, but less intense preferences. However, having also spent a lot of time on my iPad I've come to understand that e-book modes of letting me know where I am in the book are pretty easy to get used to and have some distinct advantages. I would not have an opposing view if he'd indicated that he has issues with the difficulty of referencing pagination since unlike print books, pagination varies in e-books dependent upon font size options they have which brings both the consistent pagination problems but also the benefit of being able to adjust visual comfort. And, if his reference to making "scribbles of my passage" refers to the delightful activity of highlighting text and creating marginalia, Well, e-books beat the pants off of printed books, ah, IN MY OPINION.

 

And, his concern about the irritation he feels when getting "alerts blooming across the page announcing that it's your turn in Words With Friends," as clever as it seems at first indicates that he must not have phones that ring or an awareness of the preferences for controlling alerts  on digital devices. 

 

I must say that I was much less concerned about the comments of the last three authors included in this article.

Sue Monk Kidd presents her pro-print opinions without having to counterbalance them with questionably ill-informed opinions about e-book reading.

 

Elizabeth McCracken also restricts her comments to very specific reasons why she prefers print over e-Books in that dropping a paper book while reading in the bathtub is much less of a problem than dropping one's iPad while bathing. And, coffee spills and small children? Yes, these are arguments that with the exception of simply being careful, are understandable concerns.

 

Karen Russell prefers print over e-Books but makes the most sensible statement when she recognizes that "But writing an e-book has been an exciting experiment; it's the way so many people read now. [Print versus e-books] is sort of a funny rivalry."


The problem she mentions about feeling like a dinosaur for her preference is intriguing. I would hope that one's reading preferences would NOT make one feel like an outcast. Though, those of us with some concern about sustainability issues relating to the consumption of paper might feel a bit more concerned about the matter. 

 

But, with that exception, what is the advantage in a classroom of a teacher expressing his or her preference as though students with the "other preference" are outcasts and in an indefensible position?

 

Reading preferences are not like elections where one side wins if it can demonstrate a majority approval. The real "winners" are those who prefer reading regardless of preference for means of access.

 

 Our personal preferences in reading format are personal.

 

On the other hand, our professional preferences in reading format ought to be in promoting whatever means of accessing the great stories that each of our students find most engaging. This might simply be a recognition that individualizing our lesson design should consider THEIR reading access preferences not ours.

 

And, by the way, check out the graphic used to illustrate the article. A chalk board????? 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, September 9, 4:22 PM

Interesting points by Google-lit-trips.

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6 Tips to Choosing the Right Point of View |

Nancy Kress the WD fiction columnist describes first-person, third-person and distant third-person pointof view (POV) and explains how to choose the best one for your short story.
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10 Reasons Why Students Aren't Using eTextbooks

10 Reasons Why Students Aren't Using eTextbooks | Litteris | Scoop.it

Here are several reasons why students aren't yet warming up to the idea of e-textbooks today.


Via Nik Peachey, Randy Nichols
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Audrey's curator insight, October 18, 7:49 AM

It is  much easier to access paper material or material that you can create yourself without the complications of machine equipment, which can be inaccessible. 

 

An important part of learning and using your brain is the ability to be flexible. It will take time to make e text books flexible enough for young people to use them creatively.

Curated by Audrey for http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk

 

Edgar Mata's curator insight, October 18, 3:29 PM

¿Por qué lo estudiantes no utilizan libros de texto electrónicos?

Randy Nichols's curator insight, October 23, 5:08 PM

Ah.

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'Escribe o muere', una app para escritores indecisos

'Escribe o muere', una app para escritores indecisos | Litteris | Scoop.it
A muchos nos gusta escribir. O, mejor dicho, nos gusta soñar que escribimos. Somos geniales montando escenas, creando personajes increíbles,...

Via Sonia C. Alonso
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How to Publish Your Book to the iBooks Store. | ipadders.eu

How to Publish Your Book to the iBooks Store. | ipadders.eu | Litteris | Scoop.it
This summer I published five of my iBook textbooks to the iBook Store. Since then I have gotten some questions on how to do this after your iBook is finished.

Via Peter Pappas
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10 Reasons Nonreaders Don't Read — And How to Change Their Minds | Scholastic.com

10 Reasons Nonreaders Don't Read — And How to Change Their Minds | Scholastic.com | Litteris | Scoop.it
Children are not born with a natural aversion to reading. Learn how to help reluctant readers begin to love books.

Via Evdokia Roka
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Top book-recommendation platforms: what are your favourites?

Top book-recommendation platforms: what are your favourites? | Litteris | Scoop.it

We round up the best places for reading recommendations on the web. But do you use them? Which ones do you prefer and why? Or do you resort to more traditional methods to find your next read?


Via Sara Rosett
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Sara Rosett's curator insight, October 16, 9:13 PM
Book discovery sites
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The future of the book

The future of the book | Litteris | Scoop.it
The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.

Via David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 16, 10:59 PM

Thanks to Dr. Richard Lynch.

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En pantalla y en papel

En pantalla y en papel | Litteris | Scoop.it
Es la maldición que se hace realidad con la aparición de toda nueva tecnología: expertos, aficionados y personas que no tienen nada que ver con ella predicen la desaparición de la generación anterior.

Via Ramon Aragon
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