Litteris
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Litteris
Reading and Writing in Digital Contexts. Leitura e produção textual em contextos digitais
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Strategies to Help Students ‘Go Deep’ When Reading Digitally

Strategies to Help Students ‘Go Deep’ When Reading Digitally | Litteris | Scoop.it
Teachers are finding that when they explicitly teach deep reading strategies geared to digital media, students can access and comprehend complex texts.

Via Nik Peachey, Elizabeth E Charles
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 21, 2016 4:25 AM

Some interesting ideas and suggestions.

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Cómo leer más rápido entendiendo lo que lees

Cómo leer más rápido entendiendo lo que lees | Litteris | Scoop.it
El otoño es la época del regreso a la rutina, a las clases si todavía somos estudiantes, a leer ya no tanto por placer, sino por obligación.

Via Wilmer Ramírez
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Neil Gaiman on Why We Read and What Books Do for the Human Experience

Neil Gaiman on Why We Read and What Books Do for the Human Experience | Litteris | Scoop.it
"Truth is not in what happens but in what it tells us about who we are."

Via Bobby Dillard
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11 Exercises That'll Make Book Lovers Excited To Work Out

11 Exercises That'll Make Book Lovers Excited To Work Out | Litteris | Scoop.it

"Note: The following exercises were created for satirical purposes. But if you try these at home and get more fitness and reading in, email the authors so they can feel good about their lives."


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 29, 2016 6:46 PM
29 May 2016

Did you burn more calories than pages you read today?

brought to you by GLT Global ED dba Google Lit Trips an educational nonprofit
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Nuevas metáforas sobre la lectura - Clarín.com

Nuevas metáforas sobre la lectura - Clarín.com | Litteris | Scoop.it
Ensayo. Con asombrosa erudición, Alberto Manguel une anécdotas, reflexiones y ejemplos para delinear y analizar tres tipos posibles de lector.

Via Javier Antonio Bellina
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What do we see when we read (other than the words on the page)?

What do we see when we read (other than the words on the page)? | Litteris | Scoop.it

This is the question asked by Peter Mendelsund in a welcome and fascinating new book. Or more precisely, 'What do we picture in our minds?'

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13 Literary and Book Related Prints and Posters

13 Literary and Book Related Prints and Posters | Litteris | Scoop.it
Bookish, Literary, and Book Related Prints and Posters for decoration your house, office, library, and walls.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Alexandra Lopes
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 25, 2015 3:23 PM

25 January 2015

 

I enjoy discovering the sites that provide unique ways to promote a love of reading publicly, whether it is on the walls of a classroom, a library, a young person's bedroom, a family's home, in our wardrobe...anywhere we can proclaim a love of reading publicly.

 

There are many pro-reading posters in this collection however, I must admit that the one featured above spoke to me in ways that the others only did at lesser levels.

 

Unlike others that felt a bit too much like adults trying to tell kids what to think is cool, this one "tells a story" that reminds this viewer, at least, that THESE are the REAL REASONS why reading is a good thing.

 

It reminds us that reading is about being an enjoyable way to engage in the discovery of ideas worth thinking about; thinking about what it means to be a caring or uncaring person. Reading provides an enjoyable way of expanding our receptiveness to revisiting our current understandings of what it means to be a humane being. 

 

In some way, the poster captures for me the magic of the overlapping space in the Venn Diagram of Plot and Theme; that sweet spot where the focus on both is perfect for effective teaching of reading and literature. 

 

I've seen teachers who make faces that silently convey the same repulsion that people's faces make when they have smelled something terrible nearby, when they are actually unhappy with a student's excessive interest in books that appear to be heavy on plot but vapid in theme.

 

And, I've seen students who make the same faces when they feel that a teacher is way too focused on "ruining the story" with excessive analysis of structure and theme in books that have plots for which the student has not yet discovered any way to find any interest at all.

 

In the poster above, we see engaged readers. Period. We are not told by what means these particular readers became engaged readers. It may well be because they have been fortunate to have had parents, teachers, librarians, and/or friends who planted and cultivated the seeds of life-long reading spectacularly. But, the poster's first impression for me is its focus on the rewards of engaged reading.

 

We don't know if the comments were stimulated by an unexpected plot turn or by the contemplation of the motives behind that plot turn. What we do know is there are actively engaged minds in every one the the readers. And that's a good thing.

 

So... let me engage in a bit of excessive thematic and structural analysis.

_____

NOTE: Each poster is linked to a web site where the poster is for sale. I mention this not to encourage you to consider purchasing one of the posters, but rather to point out that you will there be able to see a larger version of the poster. In fact, when you get there, click again on the poster for an even larger view.

_____

 

RE: THE TEXT

"What!": I love the punctuation. A question mark might suggest confusion and a lack of understanding of what just happened while the exclamation mark suggests to me that the reader is fully aware of what just happened and is having both an emotional and intellectual moment of contemplative outrage at what just happened.

 

"Hmm...": Another punctuation observation. I love the ellipsis. "Hmmm" is often used to suggest something like, "Hmm, I just want you to know that I heard you, but do not wish to encourage you to think that I agree with you." Or, it is often used to suggest something like, "Hmm, I hadn't thought about it that way before. I'll have to give that some thought." It is the ellipsis that encourages me to wonder what that readers' take on the particular scene actually was. 

 

"Oh!": I've read so much about the exclamation point being considered by so many to be a crutch for weak writers. The advice against using the exclamation mark generally runs along the lines of suggesting that if a writer has to tell the reader to find the writing shocking then the writing itself is weak. There are occasions where I find this advise true and there are occasions when I find this advise well-intended, but over-reaching and stifling to learners. In this case, remembering that the engagement between individual readers and individual stories is very personal, some readers might be shocked by a particular passage while others might said, "Of course. Who didn't see that coming?" The exclamation point in this poster tells me that this is a reader in the midst of total personal immersion and that she has come across something startling TO HER. These are the moments in any story where we are emotionally and/or intellectually startled by the unexpected. And, the unexpected is frequently the point at which our contemplation of the underlying themes might be "peeking" out between the lines.

 

RE: THE IMAGERY...

Body Language: There may be a parent, teacher, librarian or friend nearby, but if so they have been cropped out of the poster. The focus is on the reader's engagement and we know these readers somehow managed to reach the age they have reached and have not, as too many of our students have, abandoned a personal interest in reading.

 

The reader in the upper left corner is reading in the "default preferred" mode. She is sitting up straight and appears to be engaged and "properly attentive." Fine. If that is a way to read and discover the wonders of reading for her. Great. And, by the way, it may be important to note that she may not be simply representing the "traditional" posture of expected reading body language. She also appears to be representing the faction of readers who are perfectly okay with reading on digital devices.

 

The reader in the upper right corner who may be sitting on the floor, or in a bed, or near a campfire, or....., is obviously engaged. I don't know what she is reading, or why she is reading, but I do know she's intensely engaged.The subtlety of her leaning forward and of her fingers to her lips are indications of a sincere engaged attentiveness. 

 

Several of the readers are in positions not universally recognized as being beneficial to attentive reading. Yet each seems to give "some" clear visual indications of being attentively engaged.

JUST SOME ELEMENTS THAT I FOUND WORTH CONTEMPLATING

The standing reader is reading a newspaper. Why is she standing? Maybe she's on the subway, waiting for a bus, or a table at a table with a line out the door. Who knows, but if so, she's choosing to use that time to read.  

 

The reader in the lower right corner is listening to her iPhone. I remember when the default expectation was to not be listening to music while I was reading. Though I always liked reading, I remember an entire collections of surreptitious (read serious guilt causing) ways I'd discovered to disguise the fact that I had music playing while I did my reading homework. 

 

It wasn't until I was in college that I discovered that I had been essentially using music as a sort of white noise, drowning out the conversations leaking into my reading space from other rooms, or the sounds of kids who were still outside playing loudly, or the burping refrigerator noises, and TV sounds distracting me while I tried to concentrate on doing my homework reading. I did come to understand that music without lyrics made for more effective white noise isolation than music with lyrics. By the way, did you notice that the girl with the earbuds happens to be reading sheet music? Now that just might be a deeper engagement in reading if you ask me.

 

BUT what about the reader who is smoking? I'm kind of hoping her "OH!" exclamation is indicating that she's reading an article about the the dangers of smoking that was somehow able to cut past her inherent resistance to being receptive to revisiting her primary focus upon a perception that smoking is a sign of being cool.

 

Who knows?

 

But one thing is for sure, the poster has done a great job of engaging my interest in keeping an open mind about effective reading and literary analysis education.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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50 most popular images about books, reading, and libraries

50 most popular images about books, reading, and libraries | Litteris | Scoop.it
A list of images about books, reading, and libraries, that were most frequently shared on Facebook, Pinterest, and other social media networks.

Via liblivadia, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Skimming and diving - the art of reading

Skimming and diving - the art of reading | Litteris | Scoop.it
 by JonathanCohen
Are we really forgetting the art of reading? We are if you follow the media discussion that has been going on for several years now.

Via Elke Höfler
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My secret to reading a lot of books

My secret to reading a lot of books | Litteris | Scoop.it

If your goal is to read a lot, there are a few obstacles to overcome: keeping track of the books you want to read; refining the list down to ones you’re going to read in the near feature; actually reading them; retaining the important parts.

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La importancia de la lectura en una sociedad Tecnologizada.

La importancia de la lectura en una sociedad Tecnologizada. | Litteris | Scoop.it
La importancia de la lectura en una sociedad Tecnologizada.

Via Alfonso Noriega
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¿Qué es primero, el libro o el lector? ¿Existe la predestinación literaria? | Pijamasurf

¿Qué es primero, el libro o el lector? ¿Existe la predestinación literaria? | Pijamasurf | Litteris | Scoop.it
¿Los lectores de determinados libros o autores existen incluso antes de encontrarse con estos? ¿Hay factores de personalidad, de comportamiento, de contexto social, que nos encaminan inevitablemente a ciertas lecturas?

Via Alfonso Noriega
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6 Great Web Tools for Teaching Reading

6 Great Web Tools for Teaching Reading | Litteris | Scoop.it
In response to a number of requests we received lately about websites for teaching reading, we went ahead and curated this list featurin

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Emily Leffler's curator insight, September 19, 2016 4:27 PM

There are so many resources in technology that can supplement student learning. In today's educational world there are revolutionizing the way that challenging students can learn. 

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How does what you read affect your writing?

If you spend hours skimming the web, poring over academic journals or losing yourself in a good book, your writing may show it.

Via Gene Bodzin, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Gene Bodzin's curator insight, August 2, 2016 2:00 PM
We've all heard that garbage in, garbage out. We should also think about the corollary: treasures in, treasures out. 
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The Internet Doesn’t Make You Dumb, but What You Choose to Read Might

The Internet Doesn’t Make You Dumb, but What You Choose to Read Might | Litteris | Scoop.it
Drugs aren’t the only thing that can addle our brains. New research confirms what your brain may feel following a long, uncontrolled binge through the depths of your social media feeds: The content we devour on the internet really can have a lasting effect on our cognitive abilities. At least, so says a new study published by the International Journal of Business Administration this May.

This is by no means a new hypothesis—New York Times best-selling author Nicholas Carr has argued that the world wide web can erode our intelligence many times, and many ways. But this study suggests it may not be the screen time that’s at fault for lessened abilities—it’s the low quality of most online content. The IJBA study suggests that people who read more low-quality content had lower sophistication, syntax, cadence, and rhythm in their own writing.

In order to conduct the study, researchers collected writing samples from 65 participants between the ages of 23 and 42. Those individuals then self-reported their reading habits as well as what they spent the most time consuming in terms of books, newspapers, and websites. The information was then run through an algorithm-based complexity measurement tool, which matched the quality of the written samples against samples from the sources that the participants said they frequently read. The data suggested a strong correlation between reading and writing skills—meaning, people who read more complex stories had more complex writing, and vice versa. Of course, this study is only suggesting a correlation between these two things—it’s not necessarily clear that one causes the other.

Via Wildcat2030
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Dell Technical Support Phone Number 1 (800) 204-4427's curator insight, June 3, 2016 6:42 AM
10 Steps To A Clean #Computer #Printer, We're here to help! Call 1-877-217-7933 TollFree Number, See More.. goo.gl/UV3Un1
Marisol Reyes's curator insight, June 4, 2016 7:22 AM

Hola

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¿Cuál es el país más lector del mundo?

¿Cuál es el país más lector del mundo? | Litteris | Scoop.it
En esta pequeña nación, como en ninguna otra del planeta, la vida cotidiana y la historia están impregnadas de las mieles literarias
Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro
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How the Internet changed the way we read

How the Internet changed the way we read | Litteris | Scoop.it
Welcome to the age of hyper-information.
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Robert Bolick's curator insight, January 10, 2016 6:53 PM

Having finished reading four books, binging on TV serials and movies and keeping up with email and other online over the holiday period 10 days, I know that the Internet has changed the way we read. But exactly how?  


Those four books were print. Another two on the go are digital. The movies were downloaded or streamed, and the TV serials were streamed.  I read and send almost no mail in print. Our filing cabinet at home is gone, reduced to three cardboard expandable files.


Jackson Bliss notes some of the types of additional reading that the Internet has brought us - including commentary like this. He questions whether there is much difference of quality between the Internet types and the traditional media types. But beyond the assertions, he doesn't probe closely or extensively the substantive nature of the changes (if there are any, which he calls into doubt). Worth a read though.

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10 Reasons Why People Who Read A Lot Are More Likely To Be Successful

10 Reasons Why People Who Read A Lot Are More Likely To Be Successful | Litteris | Scoop.it
Successful people read a lot, and they owe a lot of their success to the knowledge they've gained while reading.

Via Ms Webster
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Teaching Digital Students Non-Digital Things -

Teaching Digital Students Non-Digital Things - | Litteris | Scoop.it

by Terry Heick

 

"Like thinking, reading in the 21st century is different than in centuries past, endlessly linked in an increasingly visible web of physical and digital media forms. As symbols and their referents change, so do the cognitive processes and habits.

 

"So in this context of media abundance, what does the modern, 21st century “reader” look like? How can we appeal to their interests? Or, more precisely, what does it mean to “read” in 2015? What does a reader, today, look like?

 

"How can you teach digital students non-digital things?"


Via Jim Lerman
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Black Lives Matter: Building Empathy Through Reading (Part I) | The Hub

Black Lives Matter: Building Empathy Through Reading (Part I) | The Hub | Litteris | Scoop.it

Via BJ Neary
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BJ Neary's curator insight, January 19, 2015 8:03 PM

Such great titles, look for Part 2 soon!

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The Best Commercial For Literacy (And Scotch) Ever Made

The Best Commercial For Literacy (And Scotch) Ever Made | Litteris | Scoop.it
Reading is its own reward... but scotch is nice too.
Luciana Viter's insight:

A beautiful message about reading and about life itself...

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Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read

Your Brain on Books: 10 Things That Happen to Our Minds When We Read | Litteris | Scoop.it
Click above to view full image! Any book lover can tell you: diving into a great novel is an immersive experience that can make your brain come alive with imagery and emotions and even turn on your senses.

Via Anu Ojaranta, Karen Bonanno, Patricia LeClair, KB...Konnected, R.Conrath, Ed.D., Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, Dean J. Fusto, Tom Perran
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, October 13, 2013 5:24 AM

Your brain on books. We all know reading is good for you, here's yet more proof.

sarah's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:08 AM

intéressant

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:07 PM

Educators have long told us that reading expands our minds. Here are some of the specific ways in which they do so.

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How Does Writing Affect Your Brain? [infographic]

How Does Writing Affect Your Brain? [infographic] | Litteris | Scoop.it
According to today’s infographic, writing can serve as a calming, meditative tool. Stream of conscious writing exercises, in particular, have been identified as helpful stress coping methods. Keeping a journal, for example, or trying out free-writing exercises, can drastically reduce your levels of stress.

Via Dennis T OConnor, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Cathy Ternent Dyer's curator insight, August 7, 2013 10:22 PM

Great information! Thanks to Elvira for telling me about it. :)
I've always said that keeping a journal is cheap therapy! 

Ann Kenady's curator insight, February 5, 2014 11:24 PM

Massage your brain....

Chris Shern's curator insight, February 1, 2015 5:39 AM

The power of putting pen to paper helps to make sense of a world increasingly filled with noise.

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The One Best Storytelling Tip

The One Best Storytelling Tip | Litteris | Scoop.it

The very best tip I’ve ever seen for good storytelling I wholeheartedly believe to be true. If you want to be a good writer and storyteller …read. I saw that admonition again most recently in my fourth time through “On Writing” by Stephen King.


Via Gregg Morris, Hans Heesterbeek
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Judith van Praag's comment, February 8, 2013 1:16 PM
I can attest to that. Was an avid reader as a child, which came in handy keeping the bullies in elementary school at bay. I was the storyteller in the schoolyard, with the little jerks on the edge of the circle listening in on my tales.
Peter Fruhmann's curator insight, February 12, 2013 6:08 AM

Good article! Don't think too much of methods or rigid structures. Next to reading I would say: tell stories! Practice, practice, practice and you will find out what works and what not, which stories 'belong' to you and which not. Tell your children stores, try to make up stories for them by yourself (make them the hero in the stories). I can recommend that, they are a grateful (and critical!) audience if you want to learn to tell a compelling story...